Crucial inspections coverage

“Whether you’re thinking of buying or selling, a home transaction can be an extremely stressful process,” said Jackie Chetcuti, head of Home Protection Solutions at FCT. “Buyers often fear that they may have to incur significant expenses soon after acquiring a home, and sellers may be hesitant to get an inspection at the risk of significant repair costs prior to listing their property.

“These products seek to reduce this anxiety by assessing over 400 features around the house through an

independent home inspection, and provide warranty coverage on a property’s larger, stress-inducing blind spots that are often expensive to fix.”

FCT is offering one product for buyers and another for sellers that offer comprehensive third-party home inspections with warranties that are transferable, and that cover up to $20,000.

Home purchases are usually characterized as the most expensive purchases of people’s lives, and with good reason. However, that could become compounded by something a home inspector might miss.

 

“When you go in as a buyer, you get a home inspector, but there’s not such a paradigm shift with a product like that because people are doing home inspections on the buy side,” said Chetcuti. “You get a full home inspection with over 400 points of data on the home, and that comes with a 21-month warranty.”

Real estate sales representatives, in particular, can save themselves headaches will unhappy clients by informing them about their different options, particularly if they’re millennials, she added.

“For a real estate agent, it’s important that people let their clients know that this is an option available in the market. It also provides more transparency around what people are buying,” said Chetcuti. “There’s a demand for information with millennials. A lot of the time, for a realtor with millennial clients, they’ll show up already knowing more about the house before you even take them through it. It puts the information out there before someone gets attached to a home and then finds something out about it.”

Source: Canadian Real Estate Wealth – by Neil Sharma 04 Jul 2018

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Smart strategies for single women trying to buy a home

Shop during the right seasons, when prices traditionally are more negotiable and inventory is better.

The real estate website Estately recently conducted a study showing how the continued gender wage gap in America affects home affordability and ownership for women.

To answer this question Estately used 2016 U.S. Census data to compare men’s and women’s median salaries in the 50 most populated U.S. cities.

Based on those salaries (and assuming a monthly mortgage payment of 28% of the gross monthly income) the site used a mortgage calculator to determine the maximum home price each salary could afford.

Armed with all of this information and after a review of the homes currently for sale in major cities across the country, Estately identified what percentage of homes men versus women could afford by city.

The results in some urban centers were bleak. Seattle for instance, has the biggest wage-based housing gap. Men can afford nearly 150% more homes than women. Colorado Springs, Miami, San Diego and San Jose also topped the list with significant gaps. For instance, in Colorado Springs men can afford 122.5% more homes than women, while further down the list in San Diego, the difference is still a significant 68.5%.

With these results in mind, we asked real estate and personal finance experts to share their top tips for single women seeking to purchase a home.

Don’t let the down payment scare you away

Coming up with the funds to make a down payment on a home can often seem impossible, particularly when so many Americans have sizable student loan bills and more.

Andrina Valdes, division president at Cornerstone Home Lending, urges buyers not to let this part of the process discourage them.

“Over and over again, potential home buyers report saving for the down payment as the biggest hurdle to homeownership. When you’re relying on one income to save up for it, the problem can seem insurmountable,” says Valdes.

Read: As house prices rise, this is how much more you need to save for a down payment

The good news is there are all kinds of down payment assistance programs that can help individuals get into a home for less money down.

The Federal Housing Administration loan is popular among first-time and single-income home buyers thanks to its 3.5% down payment requirement. There are also programs offered by the Department of Veterans Affairs and USDA loans that may require no down payment at all, says Valdes.

Line up a guarantor or co-purchaser

The reality is that many single income households, whether they’re run by men or women, need assistance buying a home in today’s market.

Experienced agent Julie Gans of Triplemint suggests lining up a qualified guarantor, co-purchaser or someone who might be able to gift money for your home purchase.

“These three options help buyers with lower income, lack of reserve funds or the total overall funds to purchase properties,” said Gans. “Finding the right [property] that will allow these options are important and help women and single income families be successful in their purchases.”

Consider a fixer upper

A growing trend among home buyers with limited means has been buying older properties and rehabbing them, says Ralph DiBugnara, president of Home Qualified.

“There are a few mortgage products in the market right now that make that easier,” said DiBugnara. “Fannie Mae has a loan called Home Style and FHA has what’s called a 203k loan. They both allow you to not only finance the purchase price but also construction costs in the loan to help your home look new. This is one way women can buy less inexpensive homes and make them new, also giving them a much higher valued property at completion.”

Look at homes well below your means

Real-estate analyst Julie Gurner, of FitSmallBusiness.com, says it’s critical that single income households buy properties that are well below the amount they’ve been preapproved for.

“You see that gorgeous home at the top of your range? Pass on it, and you’ll be glad you did,” said Gurner. “Single women and single income families have to be especially mindful to buy a home below their means…It gives them an additional expense cushion every month. Things come up. Doctor visits, your car breaks down, or your furnace breaking can be a big financial hit if you don’t have the ability to absorb it. On months where nothing goes wrong, you have the ability to save.”

As a single income earner, it’s important to protect yourself financially and be able to provide the necessities that make life stable. Having a home below your means can give you both and a great place to live.

House hunt during the right season

When it comes to finding an affordable home, time of year can make a big difference.

That means shopping during the right seasons, when prices traditionally are more negotiable and inventory is better, says Valdes.

Also read: How to get certified as a woman-owned business

Recent data from Trulia shows that there’s a 7% spike in starter home inventory during the fall, making it an ideal time to find a good deal. On the flip side, starter home inventory drops by more than 20% during the summer, making the warmer months a less appealing market.

Minimize credit card debt

As you embark upon your housing search, it’s critical that you reduce existing debt. This helps on a variety of levels.

You might like: One big reason it’s so hard for first-time buyers to find the right starter home

For instance, not only does it make you a better mortgage applicant, it will also help once you’re in your new home dealing with a whole host of new expenses.

Gans, of Triplemint, suggests tackling credit card debt in particular.

“Pay off all credit cards prior to purchase to lower your income to debt ratio,” advises Gans. “This reduces your liability and makes you look more appealing to a seller.”

Source:  Credit.com –  MIA TAYLOR

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What is a second mortgage? 5 tips you need to know

In certain circumstances, you may even have to think about getting a second mortgage. This is a mortgage typically taken out by homeowners who need cash for emergency repairs, working capital for business or investments, renovations, funding education, paying for a wedding, or even to consolidate other debts and lines of credit.

Let’s take a closer look at exactly what is a second mortgage, and what it means to you.

An overview of second mortgages

A second mortgage can mean two things: a mortgage you take out on a second home, some refer to literally as a second mortgage, and a mortgage which sits on top of a primary mortgage. The latter is the most accurate use of the term second mortgage, and is what we will be discussing today.

In this sense, a second mortgage is not a mortgage you get on a new home — it’s actually a secondary mortgage that you can take out on your existing property.

Second mortgages extract equity from a home, which allows homeowners to access capital when they need it. The basic form of second mortgage comes in the form of an lump sum loan.

With a standard equity loan, you can borrow up to 85 percent of the value of your home in major cities in B.C., Alberta, and Ontario. For most other cities in Canada, the maximum is typically 80 percent.

Over time, you will pay off the entirety of the loan and the interest, much like you would with a car loan. Regardless of the loan option you pursue, you should make sure you understand all the intricacies of second mortgages before getting started.

How a second mortgage works

What is a second mortgage and how does it work? As we mentioned above, a second mortgage is a secondary loan you can take out on top of your current home mortgage. They are typically held by a different mortgage lender than the one who lent you your primary mortgage. Getting a second mortgage enables you to access equity from your home without making any changes to your primary mortgage.

The distinction between primary and secondary mortgages is an important factor to keep in mind. Rather than simply increasing the principal of your initial mortgage loan, second mortgages have their own terms, rates and rules, which means you pay it off independently of your primary mortgage. When you get a second mortgage, you will continue to pay your primary mortgage, along with additional mortgage payments for your new loan.

Before you can apply for a second mortgage, you will need to find out how much equity you have in your home, your home’s value, and your credit score. All of these details will affect your ability to secure a second mortgage, and they also influence second mortgage rates and terms.

Next, you will need to shop around for the best rates from various banks and lenders. As always, it’s best to partner with a knowledgeable mortgage professional who tailor a loan product to your specific needs.

TALK WITH AN EXPERT 866-243-2207

After choosing a lender, you will fill out an application for a second mortgage. If you are approved, you can review the terms of your loan before signing an agreement.

In many ways, applying for a second mortgage is similar to applying for a primary mortgage. A major difference, however, is that second mortgage rates are typically higher than those associated with primary mortgages. This is because lenders that offer second mortgages typically have to assume more risk of delinquent payments or loan defaults.

The higher interest rate is also a result of the primary loan taking precedence over the secondary one. For example, should there be a forfeiture, the secondary lender will only get money after the primary one is paid in full. This makes secondary lending riskier.

Second mortgages can range greatly, but a borrower with good equity and credit history could get a 6.99% or 7.99% rate. While this may seem high, it’s low compared to most unsecured credit lines and credit cards

Below you will find some tips when it comes to second mortgages:

Tip #1 – Second mortgages are commonly used for…

Individuals and families may face a variety of circumstances that might lead them to consider a second mortgage loan. Generally, those who apply for a second mortgage do so out of necessity because they need capital quickly. In the interest of freeing up financial resources from home equity, they will assume the higher rates that come along with a second mortgage.

The following are some of the most common reasons people apply for second mortgages in Canada:

  • Working Capital: Getting access to your home equity is a primary funding method for those looking for working capital. This can include opening a new business or funding a current one, investing in businesses, retirement, or real estate, and any other forms of investing that requires a lump sum of capital.
  • Debt consolidation: If you have several loans and lines of credit from various lenders, banks or agencies, the payments, loan terms and interest rates may overwhelm you. When you have to concern yourself with numerous loans, you may be more likely to miss payments or pay excessive amounts of interest. A second mortgage loan allows you to pay off debts and consolidate loansinto one manageable mortgage agreement.
  • Renovations and repairs: It is common for home appliances and roofs to fail unexpectedly and necessitate emergency repairs. This kind of work on your home can be costly, and you might not have much time to save money for the repair. In other situations, you may simply want to make an improvement to the appearance or function of your home. Whatever the reasons, a second mortgage could allow you to finance these improvements.
  • Avoiding high penalties: Finally, a common use for a second mortgage is people who may have a first mortgage with a low rate locked in, and their penalty is high to break in order to access funds. It is far cheaper to get a 1-2 year second mortgage than pay a high breakage fee. This can provide access to funds for debt relief or investment capital. When the first mortgage matures, the two loans can then be blended into one.

Tip #2 – Helps those with bad credit

One of the top benefits of second mortgages is that it is possible to get one even if your credit history is mediocre or poor.

If you have paid off a significant amount of your primary mortgage loan, you have a record of making consistent and on-time payments and you have a lot of equity in your home, a lender may overlook your credit score (within reason) and approve you for a second mortgage.

Because a lender evaluates your suitability for a loan based on your equity and track record with your primary mortgage, you may even have an easier time getting a second mortgage than you would a standard loan—assuming you have been making your payments on time and you have plenty of equity.

Second mortgages are also a great way to clean up bad debt, such as high interest consumer debt, debt that is in collections, or even tax arrears.

Tip #3 – Private lenders are often more flexible

All federally regulated banks must operate within certain laws and guidelines. These rules reduce risk for the lender, but they often cause them to overlook reliable borrowers simply due to minor disqualifications.

Because every person is different, it’s important to ensure that your case is examined individually so that you have the best chance of getting the loan you need at a fair rate. To accomplish this, your best course of action can be to work with a private lender.

A private lender is a business—rather than a traditional bank or financial institution—who agrees to finance your loan. In the past, private lending was equated with individuals loaning out money at high interest rates. Although some still do this, private lenders include professional organizations, like CMI, who can offer a variety of loan products at competitive rates.

Tip #4 – Common costs associated

As with any loan, you may be subject to additional fees, including closing, legal, and appraisal fees.

When it’s all said and done, you may be on the hook for several thousands of dollars worth of fees, so make sure you know what to expect from your lender before you sign anything. This is why it’s important to work with an experienced broker who can guide you in the right direction.

TALK WITH AN EXPERT 866-243-2207

Tip #5 – Know how to find a second mortgage (talk to a professional)

Financial choices are not always totally clear, and it’s important that you examine all the options available to you to determine which decision is best for you and your family.

As a general rule, you should not make a big decision about your finances if you feel pressured or rushed. That said, you are considering a second mortgage because you are in a tough financial spot, and likely need some quick cash. This why it’s so important your partner with a knowledgeable and reputable broker to help guide you through the process in a timely manner.

Considering that there are so many different factors at play when it comes to second mortgages, you also shouldn’t attempt this process on your own. Look for guidance from a mortgage professional who you trust and who is looking out for your best interests.

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Late payments set to rise on Canadians’ $599-billion of credit card, non-mortgage debt, Equifax predicts

‘We will start to see delinquency rates inching up a little bit, and debt probably slowing down,’ as Bank of Canada starts raising interest rates, credit agency says

Canadian delinquency rates, which have been declining since the last recession, will probably reverse and begin to climb by the end of 2018 as the central bank presses ahead with interest rate increases, according to the country’s largest credit reporting firm.

Regina Malina, senior director of analytics at Equifax Canada, predicts late payments on the country’s $599 billion (US$455 billion) of credit card, auto and other non-mortgage consumer debt will begin to move “modestly higher” by the end of this year.

“Our prediction is that we will start to see delinquency rates inching up a little bit, and debt probably slowing down,” Malina said last week in an interview.

The delinquency rate — which measures the number of payments on non-mortgage debt that were more than 90 days past due — was 1.08 per cent in the first quarter, up slightly from the fourth quarter but still close to the lowest level since the 2008-09 recession.

The Toronto-based analyst declined to estimate how high delinquencies will climb, saying it depends on the pace of interest rate increases and what happens in the trade battle between the U.S. and Canada. She cited the experience in Alberta, where delinquency rates rose in some instances 20 per cent or 30 per cent on a year-over-year basis after the oil-price collapse. Such an extreme case, however, isn’t what Equifax is predicting. “It will only happen if we start seeing deterioration in employment numbers,” she said, adding delinquencies should remain “still very low,” and “they’re just going to start inching up a little bit, probably not double digits.”

CHANGE COMING?

Household credit has ballooned to unprecedented levels in Canada, as in many other developed countries, amid historically low interest rates. That hasn’t posed too many difficulties so far, because the economy and the labour market have generated solid growth, allowing people to handle servicing costs. But with the Bank of Canada intent on raising rates and the U.S. and Canada engaged in a tit-for-tat tariff fight, that could change.

A red flag in the Equifax data was a decline in the share of people who completely pay off their credit cards each month. The 56 per cent who did so in the first quarter matched the fourth-quarter number and was down from as high as 59 per cent last year. It’s a small but important detail, according to Malina.

“The changes aren’t big, but when they’re consistent and we see it for two or three quarters, we start to believe it,” she said. “Given that less people are making their credit card payments in full, and those people are usually people with lower delinquency rates, we might be seeing overall delinquency rates deteriorating.”

A red flag in the Equifax data was a decline in the share of people who completely pay off their credit cards each month. Elise Amendola/AP Photo file

Consumer debt including mortgages was $1.83 trillion in the first quarter, up 0.4 per cent from the end of 2017 and 5.7 per cent from the same quarter a year earlier, Equifax said.

Excluding mortgages, Canadians carry an average of $22,800 each in debt. Some other highlights from the report include (all figures exclude mortgage debt):

Those between the ages of 46 and 55 have the highest average debt loads, at $34,100.

That age group is also seeing the largest increase in debt, year-over-year, at 4 per cent.

Of nine cities listed, Fort McMurray, Alberta, had the highest average debt levels, at $37,800, as well as the highest delinquency rate, at 1.72 per cent.

Vancouver and Toronto saw the highest rate of debt accumulation in the first quarter, with 5.2 per cent and 5 per cent growth from a year earlier Montreal is the least indebted city, with average debt loads at $17,300 Ontario and British Columbia have the lowest delinquency rates, at 0.95 per cent and 0.84 per cent. Nova Scotia, at 1.74 per cent, had the highest.

Source: Bloomberg News Chris Fournier

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VACATION/SECONDARY HOMES PROGRAM

At Genworth Canada, we know that today’s busy lifestyle requires more home ownership options – whether it’s a second home in the city to reduce that weekly commute, or a cottage at the lake for weekend getaways. With our Vacation/Secondary Homes Program, Canadians can now purchase a second home with an affordable monthly payment with 5% down payment.

Note: To ensure eligibility for this program, please refer to the corresponding lender updates below addressing recent changes to the mortgage insurance guidelines:

Acceptable Loan Purpose & Applicable Loan-To-Value Limits:

Secondary Homes (Type A):

  • Purchase transactions: 95% LTV
    • Property value ≤ $500,000 – 5% down payment required
    • Property value > $500,000 and < $1,000,000 – 5% down payment required up to $500,000, with an additional 10% down payment on the portion of the home value above $500,000

Vacation Homes (Type B):

  • Purchase transactions: 90% LTV

Loan Security:

Secondary Homes (Type A):

  • First and second mortgages

Vacation Homes (Type B):

  • First mortgages

Eligible Properties:

Secondary Homes (Type A):

  • Maximum 1 unit
    • Property must be owner occupied or occupied by an immediate family member
  • New construction covered by a lender approved New Home Warranty Program
  • Existing resale properties
  • Readily marketable residential dwellings, located in markets with demonstrated ongoing re-sale demand
  • Estimated remaining economic life of the property should be a minimum of 25 years

Vacation Homes (Type B):

  • Property characteristics same as Type A properties except for the following;
    • Property need not be winterized
    • Seasonal access permitted (road not plowed during winter)

Ineligible properties

  • Investment properties
  • Rental pool / timeshare properties

Maximum Property Value:

  • Property value must be less than $1,000,000

Maximum Loan Amounts:

Secondary Homes (Type A)

  • Metro Toronto, Metro Calgary & Metro Vancouver: $750,000
  • Rest of Canada: $600,000

Vacation Homes (Type B)

  • $350,000 (exceptions will be considered on a case by case basis)

Qualifying Terms And Interest Rates:

  • Fixed, standard variable, capped variable and adjustable rate mortgages are permitted
  • Maximum interest rate term of 25 years
  • The qualifying interest rate is the greater of the contract rate or 5-year benchmark rate

Amortization Options:

  • Up to 25 years

Premium Rate:

  • The premium payable will be the lesser of the premium as a % of the total new loan amount or the premium as a % of the top-up portion on the additional loan amount (if existing insured) based on the rates below
LTV Ratio Type A properties Type B properties
Premium Rate Top-Up Premium Premium Rate Top-Up Premium
Up to 65% 0.60% 0.60% 1.45% 2.90%
65.01% – 75% 1.70% 5.90% 2.55% 6.10%
75.01% – 80% 2.40% 6.05% 3.15% 6.40%
80.01% – 85% 2.80% 6.20% 3.50% 7.00%
85.01% – 90% 3.10% 6.25% 4.35% 7.60%
90.01% – 95% 4.00% 6.30% N/A N/A

Note: The insurance premium is non-refundable, paid at the time of closing and may be added onto the mortgage

Borrower Qualification:

Income & Employment

  • Standard income and employment verification requirements apply

Credit Requirements

    • No prior bankruptcy or judgements
    • No R3’s in the last 24 months

Type A properties

      • >80% LTV: At least one applicant is required to have a minimum credit bureau score of 600
      • ≤ 80% LTV: At least one applicant should have a minimum recommended credit bureau score of 680

Type B Properties

    • Minimum credit bureau score of 680 is required for all applicants
    • Please note that on a case-by-case basis, we are prepared to review instances where the primary applicant meets the minimum credit score but a second applicant has no credit at all.

Down Payment

Type A Properties

    • Qualified home buyers may use traditional down payment sources including personal savings, RRSP withdrawal, non-repayable gift from immediate family member(s), sweat equity, existing home equity, proceeds from sale of property.

Type B Properties

  • Must be from own resources and may include personal savings, RRSP withdrawal, existing home equity, proceeds from sale of property.

Additional Criteria

  • Maximum of one Genworth-insured vacation property per applicant
  • No 3rd party guarantors for qualification purposes. We do accept spousal guarantors.
  • An immediate family member is defined as a father, mother, child, brother, sister, grandparent, legal guardian, or legal dependent

Debt Service Ratios:

  • GDS 39% / TDS 44%

Documentation / Information Requirements:

  • Standard documentation requirements apply
  • Genworth Canada may request that the lender provide a copy of the required documentation on a case-by-case basis

Property Type Requirements:

Secondary Homes (Type A):

  • Foundation must be permanent and installed beyond the frost line. This includes concrete/concrete block or preserved wood foundations certified by a professional engineer or post/pier foundations on solid bedrock.
  • Must be zoned and used as residential, rural or seasonal. We do not accept mixed uses or rental pooling.
  • Freehold or condominium title. We do not accept co-ops or ¼ interest ownership.
  • At minimum, property must have a kitchen, 3-piece bathroom, bedroom, and common area
  • Remaining economic life must be 25 years
  • Year-round road access on reasonable quality public roads, serviced by the local municipality. We also allow privately serviced roads, provided there is a maintenance contract in place.
  • Property must be winterized with a permanent heat source. For example, heating can be baseboard, forced air, water radiator, radiant, coal, propane, geothermal heat pumps, or heat pumps.
  • Good quality construction with no signs of deferred maintenance
  • Water source: well, municipal serviced, and cistern. Water source must be drinkable. We accept lake or river water, provided the property has its own filtration system. For example, a reverse osmosis system.
  • There must be good market appeal in the area with no adverse influences/neighbourhood nuisances

Vacation Homes (Type B):

All Type A property requirements apply to Type B, except for the following:

  • No permanent heat source is required. For example, a wood stove, fireplace, stove or heat blower is acceptable.
  • Foundation may be floating. For example, sitting on blocks.
  • Seasonal road use is acceptable. This means the road does not have to be plowed during the winter.
  • Water source needn’t be drinkable. However, there must be running water in the home.
  • Boat access only accepted

Portability:

  • Our mortgage default insurance is portable, so home buyers can take advantage of a lender’s portability plan. For further details, refer to Portability Feature Product Overview.
  • When porting from an existing standard Genworth Canada insured loan to an Vacation (Type B) loan, the premium will be the lesser of:
    • The outstanding mortgage balance multiplied by 1.10% + the top-up amount multiplied by the top-up premium rate, or
    • The new loan amount multiplied by the full premium rate

Assumptions / Assignments:

  • Mortgage is assumable subject to meeting lender guidelines

Eligible Products:

Secondary Home (Type A)

  • Borrowed Down Payment Program
  • Homebuyer 95 Program
  • Progress Advance Program
  • Purchase Plus Improvements Program
  • Second Mortgage Program

Vacation Home (Type B)

  • Purchase Plus Improvements Program

* For specific underwriting guidelines related to the above eligible products, please refer to the applicable product overview

Ineligible Products:

Secondary Home (Type A)

  • Business For Self (Alt-A) Program
  • Family Plan Program
  • New to Canada Program
  • Investment Property Program

Vacation Home (Type B)

  • Homebuyer 95 Program
  • Business For Self (Alt-A) Program
  • Borrowed Down Payment Program
  • Family Plan Program
  • New to Canada Program
  • Investment Property Program
  • Second Mortgage Program

Source: Genworth.ca

Mortgage 101: 10 Mortgage terms every first-time homebuyer should know

Getting started on your homeownership journey? Familiarize yourself with the “local language,” a.k.a. mortgage speak. This introduction to 10 key mortgage terms and phrases will boost your homebuying IQ and have you ready to meet with a mortgage broker to talk about your options.

Amortization period

The amortization period refers to the number of years it will take to pay off your mortgage through regular payments. Most mortgages, including Genworth Canada-insured mortgages, are amortized over 25 years.

DID YOU KNOW? You can pay off your mortgage sooner (saving interest in the long run) by:

  • Making payments biweekly instead of monthly;
  • Making an extra principal or lump sum payment on the anniversary date of your mortgage;
  • Boosting your payment by 10-20% on the anniversary date;
  • Making the same payments each month (or better yet: biweekly), even as your principal borrowed amount gets lower.

Fixed rate mortgage

With a fixed rate mortgage, the interest rate on your home loan is set for the term of the mortgage. Fixed rate mortgages offer the peace of mind of consistency: you’ll know exactly how much you’ll owe at the end of each mortgage term.

See also: Variable rate mortgage

Gross debt service (GDS) ratio

GDS refers to the percentage of your household’s gross monthly income that goes toward your housing payments – mortgage (principal + interest), property taxes, heating and, if applicable, 50% of condo fees. Lenders use your GDS and TDS (total debt service) ratios to assess your mortgage application and to determine how much to loan you and what interest rate to apply. Genworth Canada programs require a GDS ratio of no greater than 39%.

See also: Total debt service (TDS) ratio

High-ratio mortgage

A high-ratio mortgage is one for which the homebuyer makes a down payment of less than 20% of the cost of the home. All high-ratio mortgages must be covered by mortgage loan insurance (also known as “mortgage insurance”).

See also: Low-ratio mortgage

Low-ratio mortgage

Also known as a conventional mortgage, a low-ratio mortgage is one where the homebuyer has made a down payment of 20% or more of the home’s purchase price. No mortgage insurance is required for this type of mortgage.

DID YOU KNOW? You can use your retirement savings to help buy your nest egg. The federal government’s Home Buyers’ Plan lets you borrow money from your RRSP to put toward the down payment for your first home.

See also: High-ratio mortgage

Mortgage loan insurance

Also known as “mortgage default insurance” or just “mortgage insurance,” this financial product is mandatory on all high-ratio mortgages. Your mortgage lender pays the insurance premium and then passes the cost on to you; you can pay it in one lump sum or carry it on your mortgage for monthly payments.

Mortgage term

Not to be confused with amortization, mortgage term refers to the time period covered by your mortgage agreement. It can range from one to five years or more. After each term expires, the balance of the mortgage principal (the remaining loan amount) can be repaid in full, or a new mortgage can be renegotiated at current interest rates.

Principal

The amount initially borrowed for your home purchase. The balance of this amount will go down as you make regular mortgage payments. (Your mortgage payments go toward a portion of the principal, as well as the loan interest and, for those with high-ratio mortgages, mortgage insurance.)

Total debt service (TDS) ratio

TDS refers to the percentage of your household’s gross monthly income that goes toward housing costs (i.e., mortgage, property taxes, heating, etc.) plus your other debts and financing (i.e., car loans, credit cards, etc.). Banks use this calculation, along with your gross debt service ratio, when assessing your mortgage application. Genworth Canada programs require a TDS of no greater than 44%.

See also: Gross debt service (GDS) ratio

Variable rate mortgage

Also known as a floating rate mortgage or adjustable rate mortgage, this type of mortgage has an interest rate that fluctuates with the prime lending rate. The main benefit of variable rate mortgages is lower interest rates, but in return, mortgagors (homeowners) take on risk: if the prime rate goes up, a larger chunk of your mortgage payment will go toward the interest, not paying down your principal. The result: your mortgage could take longer to pay off and cost you more in interest.

See also: Fixed rate mortgage

Read on! You can enhance your Mortgage 101 education with these Homeownership.ca feature stories:

Source: HomeOwnership.ca

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Even New Yorkers Can’t Afford a Home in Toronto

 

There’s only a handful of cities in the world that make living in New York seem cheap for middle-income people, places like London, Sydney and Hong Kong. And then there’s Toronto, as 26-year-old JunJun Wu will tell you with a sigh.

After almost three years in New York she opted to move to Toronto for what she figured would be less-expensive housing.

“The apartments that I saw were so tiny, which was shocking,” she said. “Compared to my studio in New York, these were half the size.”

Prices have soared almost 60 percent in the last five years in Canada’s biggest city, and are up another 3 percent already this year. They’re not as high as Vancouver — one of the hottest real-estate markets anywhere — but among the world’s major cities, Toronto housing ranks as the fifth most unaffordable relative to income, according to consultant Demographia.

Severely Unaffordable

The world’s seven priciest housing markets relative to salary

Source: Demographia

Rankings are only for major markets with over 5 million residents. Price and pre-tax income are medians.

All that means is that a Canadian millennial, aged 25 to 31 with a median income of C$38,148 ($29,360), can’t buy very much housing in Toronto. Her maximum budget at that salary would be about C$193,661, according to Royal LePage. That calculation includes tougher lending rules, institutedthis year, that has reduced buyers’ purchasing power by almost 20 percent and cooled the market.

That’s probably not even enough money to purchase the garage of a detached home in the Toronto region, where the average price was C$1.05 million in May, according to the Toronto Real Estate Board.

Rents are no better, having soared about 11 percent to an average monthly C$2,206 ($1,697) in the first quarter from a year earlier, according to researcher Urbanation. That’s if you can find a unit: the number of newly completed condos available dropped to 1,945 over that time frame, the lowest in more than eight years.

Angie Mosquera, a 23-year-old software developer, saw up to 30 different units in recent months but kept getting outbid.

“I was so frustrated by the whole process,” Mosquera said. “I was like screw this, I’m going to be 40 and living at home, and I don’t even want to live in Toronto anymore.”

She eventually found a tiny studio downtown for about C$1,620 per month, meeting her budget. Still, the rent eats up a huge chunk of her salary, which is especially frustrating because she moved to Toronto from Montreal for a 40 percent bump up in pay.

Penthouse Condo

Stephanie and Justin Wood

Source: Justin Wood

Even those with more resources find it tough. Three years ago, Justin Wood and his wife Stephanie bought a three-bedroom penthouse condo for about C$430,000. Its price surged by about C$181,000 and this year they decided to upgrade to a house, with a toddler in tow.

“We thought we were going to be rich and it was going to be amazing,” said Wood, 33, who is now chief executive officer of his own Toronto-based tech startup. “But then we were like ‘Oh wait, we have to buy something.’”

As living in Toronto proved to be too expensive, the Woods headed for the suburbs and ended up purchasing a three-bedroom detached house in neighboring Oakville with a pool for about C$800,000. Monthly mortgage payments are about C$3,400. The commute is around two hours.

After spending almost a month in Toronto looking at about 40 listings, JunJun Wu, a college-prep counselor originally from Montreal, finally found a studio to rent in downtown Toronto through an online listing. She’s relieved that she secured a lease but the experience has left her unnerved.

“Maybe I should’ve gone back to Montreal instead,” she said. “I’m thinking I’ll give myself maybe one or two years in this city to see.”

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