Canada’s Top 25 Best Places to Live in 2018

25. Whitby, Ont.

Rank in 2017: 103
Population: 136,657
Estimated Unemployment Rate: 5.7%
Median Household Income: $101,792
Average Household Net Worth: $817,453
Property Tax: 11.1%
Total Days Above 20°C: 100
Crime Rate Per 100,000:* 3,251
Family Doctors Per 100,000:* 81
See more stats about Whitby, Ont. here.


24. New Tecumseth, Ont.

Rank in 2017: 170
Population: 36,745
Estimated Unemployment Rate: 5.7%
Median Household Income: $96,041
Average Household Net Worth: $755,965
Property Tax: 20.5%
Total Days Above 20°C: 122
Crime Rate Per 100,000:* 2,906
Family Doctors Per 100,000:* 95
See more stats about New Tecumseth, Ont. here.


23. Newmarket, Ont.

Rank in 2017: 56
Population: 90,908
Estimated Unemployment Rate: 5.7%
Median Household Income: $95,636
Average Household Net Worth: $947,429
Property Tax: 16.1%
Total Days Above 20°C: 107
Crime Rate Per 100,000:* 2,749
Family Doctors Per 100,000:* 95
See more stats about Newmarket, Ont. here.


22. Bonnyville No. 87, Alta.

Rank in 2017: 228
Population: 14,658
Estimated Unemployment Rate: 3.9%
Median Household Income: $103,652
Average Household Net Worth: $789,157
Property Tax: 94.0%
Total Days Above 20°C: 86
Crime Rate Per 100,000:* 4,899
Family Doctors Per 100,000:* 93
See more stats about Bonnyville No. 87, Alta. here.


21. The Nation, Ont.

Rank in 2017: 123
Population: 13,275
Estimated Unemployment Rate: 5.1%
Median Household Income: $88,088
Average Household Net Worth: $478,620
Property Tax: 54.9%
Total Days Above 20°C: 113
Crime Rate Per 100,000:* 2,186
Family Doctors Per 100,000:* 142
See more stats about The Nation, Ont. here.


20. Whistler, B.C.

Rank in 2017: 84
Population: 13,193
Estimated Unemployment Rate: 4.3%
Median Household Income: $86,423
Average Household Net Worth: $1,460,422
Property Tax: 98.6%
Total Days Above 20°C: 83
Crime Rate Per 100,000:* 14,137
Family Doctors Per 100,000:* 159
See more stats about Whistler, B.C. here.


19. St. Albert, Alta.

Rank in 2017: 7
Population: 70,874
Estimated Unemployment Rate: 6.8%
Median Household Income: $123,948
Average Household Net Worth: $900,192
Property Tax: 66.3%
Total Days Above 20°C: 84
Crime Rate Per 100,000:* 5,313
Family Doctors Per 100,000:* 129
See more stats about St. Albert, Alta. here.


18. King, Ont.

Rank in 2017: 68
Population: 26,697
Estimated Unemployment Rate: 5.7%
Median Household Income: $110,816
Average Household Net Worth: $2,655,435
Property Tax: 18.1%
Total Days Above 20°C: 114
Crime Rate Per 100,000:* 2,749
Family Doctors Per 100,000:* 95
See more stats about King, Ont. here.


17. Lévis, Que.

Rank in 2017: 9
Population: 147,403
Estimated Unemployment Rate: 3.4%
Median Household Income: $79,323
Average Household Net Worth: $387,146
Property Tax: 65.1%
Total Days Above 20°C: 94
Crime Rate Per 100,000:* 2,784
Family Doctors Per 100,000:* 106
See more stats about Lévis, Que. here.


16. Toronto, Ont.

Rank in 2017: 129
Population: 2,933,262
Estimated Unemployment Rate: 5.7%
Median Household Income: $55,945
Average Household Net Worth: $906,663
Property Tax: 66.0%
Total Days Above 20°C: 117
Crime Rate Per 100,000:* 3,847
Family Doctors Per 100,000:* 75
See more stats about Toronto, Ont. here.


15. Fort St. John, B.C.

Rank in 2017: 160
Population: 21,251
Estimated Unemployment Rate: 5.7%
Median Household Income: $106,327
Average Household Net Worth: $440,481
Property Tax: 99.5%
Total Days Above 20°C: 64
Crime Rate Per 100,000:* 14,000
Family Doctors Per 100,000:* 104
See more stats about Fort St. John, B.C. here.


14. Saugeen Shores, Ont.

Rank in 2017: 17
Population: 14,109
Estimated Unemployment Rate: 4.9%
Median Household Income: $105,210
Average Household Net Worth: $777,845
Property Tax: 14.2%
Total Days Above 20°C: 110
Crime Rate Per 100,000:* 5,113
Family Doctors Per 100,000:* 107
See more stats about Saugeen Shores, Ont. here.


13. Mont-Royal, Que.

Rank in 2017: 8
Population: 21,172
Estimated Unemployment Rate: 6.3%
Median Household Income: $145,853
Average Household Net Worth: $2,392,238
Property Tax: 1.4%
Total Days Above 20°C: 117
Crime Rate Per 100,000:* 4,594
Family Doctors Per 100,000:* 124
See more stats about Mont-Royal, Que. here.


12. Red Deer, Alta.

Rank in 2017: 330
Population: 107,564
Estimated Unemployment Rate: 4.9%
Median Household Income: $90,844
Average Household Net Worth: $628,900
Property Tax: 86.7%
Total Days Above 20°C: 83
Crime Rate Per 100,000:* 19,460
Family Doctors Per 100,000:* 99
See more stats about Red Deer, Alta. here.


11. Camrose, Alta.

Rank in 2017: 216
Population: 19,488
Estimated Unemployment Rate: 3.9%
Median Household Income: $61,873
Average Household Net Worth: $519,846
Property Tax: 74.9%
Total Days Above 20°C: 83
Crime Rate Per 100,000:* 9,520
Family Doctors Per 100,000:* 99
See more stats about Camrose, Alta. here.


10. Halton Hills, Ont.

Rank in 2017: 24
Population: 65,782
Estimated Unemployment Rate: 5.7%
Median Household Income: $108,410
Average Household Net Worth: $1,190,923
Property Tax: 24.3%
Total Days Above 20°C: 120
Crime Rate Per 100,000:* 2,133
Family Doctors Per 100,000:* 91
See more stats about Halton Hills, Ont. here.


9. Saint-Lambert, Que.

Rank in 2017: 55
Population: 22,432
Estimated Unemployment Rate: 4.9%
Median Household Income: $83,626
Average Household Net Worth: $881,272
Property Tax: 12.5%
Total Days Above 20°C: 118
Crime Rate Per 100,000:* 3,724
Family Doctors Per 100,000:* 96
See more stats about Saint-Lambert, Que. here.


8. Westmount, Que.

Rank in 2017: 52
Population: 21,083
Estimated Unemployment Rate: 7.5%
Median Household Income: $117,755
Average Household Net Worth: $3,953,205
Property Tax: 8.9%
Total Days Above 20°C: 117
Crime Rate Per 100,000:* 4,594
Family Doctors Per 100,000:* 124
See more stats about Westmount, Que. here.


7. Canmore, Alta.

Rank in 2017: 29
Population: 14,930
Estimated Unemployment Rate: 5.1%
Median Household Income: $75,848
Average Household Net Worth: $1,478,315
Property Tax: 99.0%
Total Days Above 20°C: 64
Crime Rate Per 100,000:* 7,482
Family Doctors Per 100,000:* 138
See more stats about Canmore, Alta. here.


6. Milton, Ont.

Rank in 2017: 151
Population: 120,556
Estimated Unemployment Rate: 5.7%
Median Household Income: $111,875
Average Household Net Worth: $1,129,276
Property Tax: 67.7%
Total Days Above 20°C: 120
Crime Rate Per 100,000:* 2,133
Family Doctors Per 100,000:* 91
See more stats about Milton, Ont. here.


5. Lacombe, Alta.

Rank in 2017: 299
Population: 13,906
Estimated Unemployment Rate: 4.9%
Median Household Income: $97,800
Average Household Net Worth: $754,291
Property Tax: 76.6%
Total Days Above 20°C: 81
Crime Rate Per 100,000:* 7,932
Family Doctors Per 100,000:* 99
See more stats about Lacombe, Alta. here.


4. Saint-Bruno-de-Montarville, Que.

Rank in 2017: 6
Population: 27,171
Estimated Unemployment Rate: 4.9%
Median Household Income: $96,757
Average Household Net Worth: $864,221
Property Tax: 18.8%
Total Days Above 20°C: 118
Crime Rate Per 100,000:* 3,724
Family Doctors Per 100,000:* 96
See more stats about Saint-Bruno-de-Montarville, Que. here.


3. Russell Township, Ont.

Rank in 2017: 21
Population: 17,155
Estimated Unemployment Rate: 5.1%
Median Household Income: $112,644
Average Household Net Worth: $509,564
Property Tax: 50.1%
Total Days Above 20°C: 78
Crime Rate Per 100,000:* 2,540
Family Doctors Per 100,000:* 142
See more stats about Russell Township, Ont. here.


2. Ottawa, Ont.

Rank in 2017: 1
Population: 999,183
Estimated Unemployment Rate: 5.1%
Median Household Income: $93,975
Average Household Net Worth: $695,242
Property Tax: 39.3%
Total Days Above 20°C: 117
Crime Rate Per 100,000:* 3,782
Family Doctors Per 100,000:* 142
See more stats about Ottawa, Ont. here.


1. Oakville, Ont.

Rank in 2017: 15
Population: 209,039
Estimated Unemployment Rate: 5.7%
Median Household Income: $112,207
Average Household Net Worth: $1,742,036
Property Tax: 21.4%
Total Days Above 20°C: 107
Crime Rate Per 100,000:* 2,133
Family Doctors Per 100,000:* 91
See more stats about Oakville, Ont. here.

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Affordability: What first-time homeowners need to know

Affordability. It’s a word that gets tossed around a lot when people talk about homeownership, but what does it really mean? Affordability is a term that’s both quantifiable (lending institutions use a formula) and a little bit subjective (lifestyle considerations factor in, too). Here’s what you need to know about affordability, and what it means for you.

AFFORDABILITY, AS DETERMINED BY LENDERS

For lending institutions and mortgage insurers, affordability can be summed up by the debt service ratios, as indicated by your gross debt service ratio and total debt service ratio.

Gross debt service (GDS) ratio
  • Homeownership costs (mortgage payments, property taxes, heating and, if applicable, 50% of condo fees), relative to household income
Total debt service (TDS) ratio
  • Homeownership costs (as outlined above) plus debt payments (credit cards, lines of credit, student loans, car loans, etc.), relative to household income

To qualify for mortgage insurance (mandatory for any home purchase with a down payment of less than 20% of the cost of the home), the highest allowable GDS ratio is 39% and the highest allowable TDS ratio is 44%.

TIP: Get a quick snapshot of your current debt service ratios via Genworth Canada’s What Can I Afford? calculator.

AFFORDABILITY, AS DETERMINED BY LIFESTYLE

Although debt service ratios are an indicator of bottom-line affordability, other real-world factors should be considered up front by potential homeowners.

Expenses like groceries, child care, transportation, and mobile phone and Internet services, for instance, are not covered by TDS, but they’re more or less fixed costs for many households. While they don’t affect debt service ratios, they should be included in your own budget calculations, as they eat up a large chunk of income.

Discretionary expenses like clothing, entertainment, memberships and kids’ extracurricular activities should also be factored into affordability considerations. Are there any areas where you could cut back? Or will some expenses disappear, such as when a car is paid off or when a child leaves daycare for full-time school?

SET A BUDGET YOU CAN AFFORD

Between the numbers-driven debt service ratios used by banks, trust companies and mortgage insurers and the discretionary lifestyle expenses that also affect your bottom line, you will find what affordability means for you.

It’s never too early in your homeownership journey to speak with a mortgage professional or financial planner to determine how much mortgage you can comfortably carry. This will help you assess your financial fitness and also help you set realistic goals on an achievable timeline.

Source: Genworth.ca (Homeownership.ca) 

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Stress Test Impacts Measured

The government’s latest mortgage rule changes have caused an imbalance between supply and demand in almost every region of the country, and will result in an estimated 200,000 fewer jobs being created over the next three years.

Those are among the findings of Mortgage Professionals Canada’s newly released Report on the Housing and Mortgage Market in Canada.

“…the cumulative impact of rising rates, a 2% or greater stress test, provincial government rules in Ontario and British Columbia, and further lending restrictions are negatively suppressing housing activity, not just in Toronto and Vancouver, but throughout the country,” said Paul Taylor, President and CEO of Mortgage Professionals Canada.

Will Dunning, the report’s author and the association’s chief economist, added that aside from the new mortgage lending policies “unduly suppressing” housing activity, consumers are now taking a materially more negative outlook towards housing.

“Our consumer survey has found that sentiment regarding the housing market has shifted decisively downwards during the past year and a half, reflecting the impacts of increased interest rates and government policies that are making it more difficult for potential homebuyers to obtain the mortgage financing they need,” he wrote.

While an increasing number of first-time buyers are receiving down payment assistance from their parents, many young people are adapting to the idea that they may never own a home and will become permanent renters.

The following are highlights from the report:

 

New OSFI Regulations

  • 100,000: The number of Canadians who have been prevented from buying a home bythe stress test.
  • 18%: The percentage of prospective buyers, who could currently afford their preferred purchase, who would fail a stress test. Of those affected, the average adjustment needed is $28,750.
  • 32%: The percentage of consumers who would expect the stress test to have significant negative impacts on their ability to buy a home. This increases to 54% for those who aren’t currently homeowners but who expect to buy within the next five years.
  • 29%: The percentage of consumers who would expect to be negligibly impacted by the stress test. This figure falls to 11% for non-homeowners who plan to buy within the next five years.
  • 12.5%: The amount that resale activity in Canada has fallen compared to last year (down 16.5% from 2016).
  • 59%: Percentage of consumers who had been “aware of the changes before today.” (65% for homeowners and 47% for tenants).

 

Housing Market Trends

  • 229%: The percentage increase in average house prices from 1997 to 2017 (or 6.2% per year).
    • This is more than twice as fast as the increase in wages (2.6% per year).
  • 67.8%: The home ownership rate in Canada. This is down from 69% in 2011, and largely a result of the delay for first-time buyers to save up their down payments to make their purchase.

 

Economic Impact of Slowing Housing Activity

  • 120–140k: The reduction in employment that could be expected due to the current forecasted reduction in new home starts and home sales for 2019.
  • 200k: The estimated number of fewer jobs that will be created over the next three years as a result of the mortgage stress test.
  • 2.45: The number of full-time jobs created by each new housing unit started in Canada.

 

Sources of Down Payments – Family to the Rescue

  • 85%: Percentage of down payments that come from personal savings. This figure has been consistent over time.
  • The top sources of down payment funds for homes bought from 2015 to 2018 were:
    • 85%: Personal savings (vs. 92% last year)
    • 39%: Gifts from parents or other family members (vs. 43% from 20142017)
    • 25%: Loan from parents or other family members (vs. 19% from 20142017)
    • 43%: Loan from a financial institution (vs. 27% from 20142017)
    • 38%: Withdrawal from RRSP (vs. 29% from 20142017)
  • The report notes a “remarkable amount of stability” in down payments among first-time homebuyers. The average first-time down payment in the 1990s was 22%, compared to 26% for first-time purchases made from 2014 to 2017.

 

Consumer Sentiment

  • 6.84: The score (out of 10) given by consumers who agree that “low interest rates have meant a lot of Canadians became homeowners over the past few years who should probably not be homeowners.” This score is below the average of the eight previous surveys of 7.00 and the second-lowest ever.
  • 3.54: The score given by consumers who “regret taking on the size of mortgage I did.” This is at an all-time low and below the prior average of 3.80.
  • 7.14: The average score given by Canadians on their confidence on their ability to weather a downturn. This is the highest score in the history of the survey.
  • 6.12: The average score given by consumers who are optimistic about the economy in the year ahead. This is slightly below average, with confidence highest in Quebec and lowest in Atlantic Canada.
  • 75%: The percentage of non-owners aged 25 to 34 who expect to buy a home within the next five years.
  • House price growth: Expectations for growth are highest in Quebec, Ontario and B.C., and lowest in Alberta and Saskatchewan.
  • 67%: The percentage of consumers who expect interest rates to rise. 31% gave a neutral response. The report notes that these expectations have not been good predictors of what will happen to interest rates.

 

Reasons Against Owning

  • 31%: Renting is a better option
  • 29%: I’m comfortable in my current situation
  • 28%: Need more time to save for a down payment
  • 24%: Lack of financial/employment stability
  • 18%: Waiting for home prices to decrease
  • 11%: Living with parents/family is all I can afford

 

Mortgage Renewals

  • The increasing interest rates over the past year are expected to have “negligible” effects on the rate of credit growth.
    • “Most people renewing mortgages this year will be completing a 5-year term, and for most of them their new interest rate will be very close to the old rate.”
  • 3.32%: The average 5-year fixed “special offer” rate for the first half of 2018 (vs. 3.31% in 2013).
  • 2.50%–2.75%: The average 5-year variable rate this year (vs. 2.73% in 2013).

Source: Canadian Mortgage Trends – STEVE HUEBL

 

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Uncategorized, wealth

4 Men with 4 Very Different Incomes Open Up About the Lives They Can Afford

Stuart Patience

 The median household income in America is $53,657. Politicians draw $250,000 as the line between the middle and upper classes. And the true starting point of real wealth remains a cool $1,000,000. We asked four more or less typical men, each of whom earns one of these incomes, to tell us about the lives they can afford.

$1,000,000 Per Year – Tim Nguyen, 35

Location: Huntington Beach, California

Occupation: Business owner, CEO/cofounder of BeSmartee, a DIY mortgage marketplace

Family status: Married with a 9-month-old son

Homeowner? Renter? “I’m a homeowner. No mortgage.” (Price of home: $1 million.)

Do you keep a budget? We track every single penny that comes in and out of our bank account. And we give 6 percent of our money away to charity. We have a big heart for animals, children, the el­derly, the underprivileged.

What’s a weekly grocery bill for you? I break it down monthly. We eat main­ly at home. We spend around $1,200 a month.

One thing your family needs but can’t afford: There’s nothing that we need that we can’t afford. Anything reasonable I can afford.

One thing you want but can’t afford: The thing that keeps me up at night is want­ing to retire my parents. There’s a certain dollar figure that would allow me to pay off all their debts. That’s my first goal: to retire my parents so they can be independent and just live their lives.

The last thing you bought that required serious plan­ning: We budget our money all the time, so we’ve already been planning for every­thing—I could tell you exactly where all my money is going over the next five years.

Do you have credit cards? I have one credit card. It’s cash for points, so we charge ev­erything on the card and pay it off at the end of the month.

How much debt are you carrying now? Less than 10 grand.

I’VE BEEN BROKE BEFORE. I’VE REFINANCED MY HOUSE TO PAY MY EMPLOYEES. I’VE BEEN THROUGH ALL THAT—THAT WAS ME WORRIED.

Saving for retirement? Yes. [I’ve put away] north of $5 million.

At what age would you like to retire? I’ll always be working. As far as working on a start-up, I want to be done with that in five or 10 years. But as far as working, investing in real estate, things of that nature, you can do that until you’re 90.

College plans for your kids? We set up a trust with our at­torney where our kids will have money for college. But they’ll only get more than that if they achieve their milestones, such as getting a certain GPA or vol­unteering in the community. We want our kids to be good citizens. They can’t be spoiled brats. We want them to understand what it means to work and to earn your way to the top. We put the rules in place to help reinforce that.

Looking at your current ca­reer prospects, how much money do you think you’ll be earning in ten years’ time? My goal is to have a net worth of $150 to $200 million.

How happy are you on any given day, on a scale of one to ten? I’d say eight or nine. Lately, with the start­-up, I’ve been putting in two to three hours more per day than I’d like, and that’s taking away from family time. So if I could get those two or three hours back, I’d be a happy man.

How often do you worry about money? Maybe once a week. I’ve been broke before. I’ve refinanced my house to pay my employees. I’ve been through all that—that was me worried. Now, because I’m able to forecast and plan my money better, there’s not as much worry.

How much money do you think you’d need to have the life you want? I need about 25 [million]. That includes retiring my parents, an upgraded home, and enough money to make sure my kids have funds available when they want to start their own businesses. There’s a certain amount of mon­ey you need to live the life you want. Beyond that, it’s really a game, and money is the scoreboard.

Do you think your taxes are too high? I’m happy with taxes. I had a really good year when I was 22 or 23—I made about 250 grand—and I came home and complained to my dad about it. I said, “I can’t believe I’m paying all those taxes! Half the money is gone!” And my dad said, “You should feel lucky that you live in a country where you can pay taxes”: He came from a communist-run coun­try. Ever since that day, I never complain about my taxes.


$250,000 Per Year – Yakov Villasmil, 41

Location: Miami

Occupation: Real Estate Agent

Family Status: In a relationship; one son, 10 years old

Monthly rent: $2,000

Do you keep a budget?  Yes, I’m very organized with it. Overall, my fixed expenses are about $7,000 a month. They include rent and about $1,000 a month for transportation, $180 a month to the cleaning lady, $200 for gas for the vehicle, and a handful of little things—$300 a month for Netflix, Pandora, Skype, subscriptions like that.

What’s a weekly grocery bill for you?  I would say about $200 a week.

AT THIS POINT IN MY LIFE, IF I HAD $600,000 YEARLY INCOME, I WOULD HAVE THE LIFE THAT I WANT TO BE LIVING. BUT THEN AGAIN, WHEN I GET THERE, I’LL WANT TO BUY THE JET.

One thing your family needs but can’t afford: Nothing.

One thing you want but can’t afford: I’m a fan of watches, and there’s a Cartier that just came out that’s about $10,000. It’s not that I can’t afford it; it’s just not a priority right now.

The last thing you bought that required serious plan­ning: I spend money trav­eling every year, and that’s something I put some thought into. Last December, I went to Austria, Slovenia, and Italy.

Do you have credit cards? Fifteen.

How much debt are you carrying now? $7,700 on one card, and it should be paid off by the end of the month.

Saving for retirement? I am saving, but not for re­tirement. I’m saving up to buy an apartment building, which will give me another stream of income. My money is all in play right now to make more money. The kind of life that I want to live when I retire is not one I have to manage by having, you know, a million dollars and 3 or 4 percent [interest]. It’s not going to happen.

At what age would you like to retire? I don’t think that I want to retire.

But say you did: At what age would you be able to retire? I want to be financially free by age 50.

College plans for your kid? No, but it’s all part of making sound investments.

Looking at your current career prospects, how much money do you think you’ll be earning per year in 10 years’ time? In 10 years’ time, I want to have $50,000 a month from apartment buildings, and another $50,000 a month from the real estate business. A million-five per year is the goal.

How often do you worry about money? Every single day. Every single minute. I always want more, and every single day I’m thinking, “What’s the next move?”

How much money do you think you’d need to have the life you want? At this point in my life, if I had $600,000 yearly income, I would have the life that I want to be living. But then again, when I get there, I’ll want to buy the jet.

How happy are you, on a scale of one to 10? I’m a good nine every day.

Do you think your taxes are too high? You know what? No, I don’t think they’re too high. I re­member I had a boss about 10 years ago who said, “You guys complain about the tax­es being taken out—if you don’t want them to take that much, just make less.”


$53,000 Per Year – Michael Greene, 48

Location: Brooklyn

Occupation: Concierge for a property-management group

Family status: Married with 3 children (a 21-year-old stepson and 8-year-old twin girls)

Monthly rent: $1,000

Do you keep a budget?

We do. Because of the size of our family, we have to budget at least $150 per month for BJ’s [Wholesale Club]. BJ’s is our friend; we have to buy in bulk.

What’s a weekly grocery bill for you? Probably in the range of $100 to $125.

I’D LOVE TO STAY IN BROOKLYN, BUT RIGHT NOW THE ASKING PRICE IS BETWEEN $500,000 AND $600,000.

One thing your family needs but can’t afford: A ranch-style home, four to five bedrooms, two to three bathrooms. I’d love to stay in Brooklyn, but right now the asking price is between $500,000 and $600,000.

One thing you want but can’t afford: I’ve always liked Volvos. If I could get a big, six-seater Volvo, that would be nice. In my color: navy blue. With a little TV in the back for the kids.

The last thing you bought that required serious planning? We bought bedroom sets for ourselves and our girls four years ago. Our set was between $5,000 and $6,000, with the dressers and everything. Our girls’ little beds—which they’re about to outgrow now—we got a better deal for them: around $2,000 or $2,500. I had to go into my savings a bit to get it, but we got it. We got it done.

Do you have credit cards? Just one. A Chase Visa. I’m definitely on top of my month­ly payments, and I try not to go anywhere past $300 to $400 a month. That would be stretching it. And I have to thank my wife for that. She helps me stay focused.

How much debt are you carrying now? No credit-card debt, but I definitely still have a student loan from the mid-nineties that I’m trying to bang out. I think I still have seven G’s left.

Saving for retirement? Yes, I am. Our company of­fers a 401(k) plan, and our union offers one, so I have two separate running re­tirement plans. Gotta do it. I don’t know how much is in there at the moment.

At what age would you like to retire? I’m 48 now. Realistically, I’d say I wouldn’t want to go past 60. But I think I’m looking at 60 be­fore I’ll be able to retire.

College plans for your kids? We have a college plan in place for the girls. I put away money biweekly—$75 to $100.

How much money do you think you’ll be earning per year in 10 years’ time? I’d love to say I’ll be making dou­ble if not more than double what I’m making now.

How often do you worry about money? Money is not something that I stress over.

How much money do you think you’d need to have the life you want? I’m not a greedy guy. Because of my upbringing, where we learned how to do more with less, and with the times and the econ­omy we live in now, my fami­ly and I could be very comfort­able at $200 to $250K a year. I could be very comfortable with that.

How happy are you, on a scale of one to ten? Eight.

Do you think your taxes are too high? Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes.


The Poverty Line (Or: $7 An Hour Plus Tips) – Demetrius Campbell, 25

Location: Chicago

Occupation: Bar-back at the Signature Lounge in the John Hancock building

Family status: Single with two daughters, 7 and 4

Monthly rent: 30 percent of income through antipoverty nonprofit Heartland Alliance

Do you keep a budget? No, but I have been working on trying to recently. I know I have to pay bills for food, for clothes, gas. It’s a lot of things that go into budget­ing. It’s hard to plan for, be­cause you never really know what you’re going to need to spend money on. And the amount of money I make var­ies, because I work different hours. The biggest two-week check I’ve had so far is $250.

I’M IN A LOT OF DEBT. I HAVE TRAFFIC TICK­ETS, HOSPITAL BILLS, OLD PHONE BILLS. I’M PRETTY SURE THAT MY DEBT FROM THE TICKETS ALONE IS ROUGHLY $3,000.

What’s a weekly grocery bill for you? In a week, about $130 to $140—that’s when I have the money to spend. I’m on food stamps, and I get $400 a month through EBT.

One thing your family needs but can’t afford: I don’t really think about stuff like that. I just try to make do with what I have. I feel like I’m just working to pay for the bills. I don’t even have time to spend with my family—to take them out to certain places.

One thing you want but can’t afford: I’d buy a newer-model car. And every time those commercials come on TV—the Pillow Pets—my kids always ask for those. It’s discouraging, having to tell them all the time that we can’t afford things.

The last thing you bought that required serious plan­ning: I bought a TV—a Black Friday deal. It’s a Vizio 39-inch. I paid like $250. I had to work for it. I saved up.

Do you have credit cards? No.

How much debt are you carrying now? I’m in a lot of debt. I have traffic tick­ets, hospital bills, old phone bills. I’m pretty sure that my debt from the tickets alone is roughly $3,000. By the time you get the money to pay the ticket, the fine has doubled. Then you get another one and can’t pay that one. Like, I’m on a boot [booted vehi­cles] list, and I got the money to get off the list, but my car got towed that morning, so I had to pay half that money to get it out of the impound. It just keeps going like that.”

Saving for retirement? No. Retirement is a long ways from now.

At what age would you like to retire? As young as I can and still have money. Probably late 60s.

College plans for your kids? I’ve thought about it. Once I get all my debts paid off and I’m in a better place, I’ll start putting as much money as I can toward it. I’ll take steps to put myself in better standing.

How much money do you think you’ll be earning per year in 10 years’ time? My goal is to triple what I’m making now.

How often do you worry about money? Always. Living like this is hard to do.

Does money ever keep you up at night? I can say that it has. It’s a lot of things building up—having the money when the bills are due, having a ticket, and not being able to pay it before it doubles.

How much money do you think you’d need to have the life you want? 50 to 60 thousand a year.

How happy are you, on a scale of one to 10? I’d say a seven or eight. But you might get lucky and catch me on 10 now and then.

Do you think your taxes are too high? Yes, I do.

Source: Esquire –INTERVIEWS BY 

Illustrations by Stuart Patience.

This article originally appears in the April 2016 issue. 

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Top 10 Most Expensive Condo Buildings in Mississauga

 

Back in the early 2000s, it wasn’t uncommon to hear warnings about the ongoing condo boom in Mississauga and surrounding cities.

“They’re over saturating the market,” they said.

“Their value will drop like a rock soon and people will be horrified they spent $200,000 on a box in the sky! They’ll be lucky to sell it for $100,000!”

Now, in 2018, it doesn’t look like the condo market experienced the dreaded crash that naysayers insisted developers were tempting with every new build.

In fact, some condo buildings feature very costly units.

As low-rise home prices have gone up, so has demand for more affordable condo units, which have become the new “starter home” in many corners of the GTA.

Toronto-based real estate brokerage and website Zoocasa says that Mississauga is a particularly popular buying destination, offering good value as well as return on real estate investment.

Zoocasa says that, over the last year, Mississauga condo prices rose 5.5 per cent to $435,254.

“This has all contributed to steady demand for units – but some buildings are appreciating in value at a faster clip than others,” Zoocasa says.

To identify which Mississauga buildings fetch the most for a unit, Zoocasa analyzed sales in over 100 developments in the city, where at least five transactions had taken place, and averaging the square foot based on TREB sold data for the 2018 year to date.

Here’s a look at the priciest buildings:

Naturally, some of the most expensive buildings—North Shore, Number 1 City Centre Condos, Pinnacle Grand Park and Limelight—are centered around Square One.

According to Zoocasa, units in these buildings can cost up to $674 per sqaure foot.

“Immediate takeaways from the data is that the most expensive buildings are largely clustered around the Mississauga city centre, with a few closer to Lake Ontario,” Zoocasa says.

“None of the buildings were located north of Eglinton Avenue. In addition, the buildings skew newer, with the oldest one having been registered in 2004, and the majority after 2012.”

So there you have it—if you’re looking for a more affordable unit, you might have better luck with a more mature building outside of the Square One area.

Source: Insauga – by Ashley Newport on July 28, 2018

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Can’t Get a Bank Mortgage? How Do Private Mortgages Work?

It’s often said that housing is the bedrock of the Canadian economy. But for years, federal regulations have clamped down on the ability to qualify for a mortgage. The self-employed, individuals living in rural areas and those with past credit troubles have long struggled with home financing. Now that struggle is extending to other segments of the population.

Against this backdrop, more and more Canadians are turning to private mortgage lenders for their home financing needs. Although many borrowers think of private mortgages as a last-resort option, they are a viable option for many people.

Private Mortgage Lenders Operate Differently from Banks

A private mortgage is simply a home loan offered by an individual or company other than a bank or traditional finance provider.

One of the biggest benefits of working with a private lender is they operate differently from traditional banks on many levels. Since they get their money through individual investors or groups of investors, they have the freedom to set their own lending criteria. This means they are more flexible in the application process and don’t have to deal with the stringent guidelines set forth by the major institutions. This means that if your situation falls outside conventional lending guidelines, a private mortgage could be your best bet.

Private mortgages are often suitable if you:

  • Are self-employed
  • Want to purchase raw land or unique property
  • Have less than ideal credit
  • Want to invest in real estate
  • Need access to equity in your home, but don’t want to refinance your first bank mortgage due to excessive penalties
  • Need to consolidate high interest rate debt
  • Are looking to renovate existing property
  • Looking for a short-term loan

How Private Mortgages Work

If you’re exploring a private mortgage, the first step is to seek out a broker who provides alternative lending services. The broker will assess your situation and determine if you are eligible for a loan. In particular, they will assess your ability to make the loan payments on time.

From there, the broker will then search for the best mortgage solution that meets your specific needs. They will then structure the deal and put in place an exit strategy so that you know how long the private mortgage will last.

It’s important to note that private lenders usually lend on location. That’s because private mortgages are uninsured, which means the lender falls back on the property should a default occur. That’s why location of the property is extremely vital in determining whether you qualify for a private mortgage and the rate that you’re offered.

Broker fees and legal fees generally apply when securing a private mortgage.

Private mortgages are growing in popularity as more borrowers fall outside the traditional lending guidelines set forth by the major banks. The good news is there are plenty of options for those looking for an alternative lending solution to finance their next property or major purchase.

Source: Canadian Mortgages Inc. – 1 September, 2017 / by Bryan Jaskolka

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What is a mortgage broker, and should I use one?

But what is a mortgage broker exactly, and what can they do for you?

A mortgage broker is a licensed professional – a person who serves as a bridge between a homeowner and a lender.

As a middleman, a mortgage broker evaluates the financial capacity of a borrower. A broker looks for top quality lending products and handles all transactions for their clients. A broker gathers the necessary documents to apply for a mortgage and then facilitates the underwriting and approval process. They ensure that the transactions are valid and complete.

The Lending Process

When should I see a mortgage broker?

Now that you know what a mortgage broker is, you also need to determine when the right time is to consult with one. If you fall in any one of the categories below, you might need to see a broker:

  • You are a first-time home buyer.
  • You want to purchase a second property
  • You want to free up funds for things like renovations, a child’s education, investments, and more.
  • You have very limited time left to purchase a house.
  • You are not comfortable with the idea of negotiating with lenders.
  • You have a weak credit score.
  • You want access to exclusive rates and deals from banks which are offered only to brokers.
  • You prefer to have an expert who provides you with an educated and confident analysis of the current housing market.
  • You need help in deciding on a financing structure that is advantageous for you in the long run.

Take the case of Maureen:

Maureen is an interior design artist who moved to Toronto with her husband. After doing her research, she signed an agreement to buy a house. A bank approved her mortgage, and she was ready to make the deposit of her first mortgage. However, knowing that the bank was willing to lend her thousands of dollars, she was skeptical if she was getting the best offer.

While considering the offer, a friend suggested that she consult with a mortgage broker. Her friend recommended a broker whom she transacted with before. After talking to the broker, Maureen realized that the rates presented by the broker are better compared to the bank’s offer.

Though Maureen was initially unaware about the important role that a mortgage broker plays in home buying, she made the decision to close the deal for her new home through one whens she realized the undeniable advantages.

Mortgage brokers are very convenient to work with. They have extensive networks of investors, lenders, and real estate companies. Just like in the abovementioned case of Maureen, mortgage brokers are committed in providing you housing options that match your requirements.

The benefits of working with a professional mortgage broker

Licensed mortgage brokers are professionals who are well-trained and knowledgeable at what they do. Most of them have a proven track record when it comes to handling mortgage transactions. Moreover, given their extensive experience in the housing industry, their network is just as vast.

Access to critical industry information

Working with a mortgage broker means gaining access to first-hand information on your market and lending options. Brokers are part of a broad community where members share valuable data. These details include real property values, new home releases, new financing rules, pricing, and among others.

Access to the best lending rates

Because most mortgage brokers have access to an extensive network of lenders, borrowers who tap their expertise widen their options.

Customize your loan plan

Brokers have access to traditional and non-traditional lenders which may be able to offer creative financing solutions for your situation.

Your quarterback

Mortgage brokers are there to work for you. They will handle many of behind-the-scenes paperwork and negotiation that will help ensure you get the achieve the most favorable loan solution.

Factors to consider when choosing a mortgage broker

Not all mortgage brokers are the same. Some may be more equipped to meet your needs than others. Therefore, you need to consider the following:

License and affiliation of a mortgage broker

Be sure to consult only with a licensed broker who is officially registered as a member of Canada’s National Association of Professional Mortgage Brokers. These associations spread advocacy, share knowledge, and disseminate relevant information to mortgage clients.

Canadian resident and knowledge of the locality

Your chosen licensed mortgage broker should be a resident of Canada, and must be familiar with the housing market of the specific location where you intend to purchase a new home.

Mortgage lender portfolio

A comprehensive mortgage lender portfolio is proof of all the hard work the mortgage broker has put in. Moreover, access to as many lenders as possible means a broker has the means to help you find the right funding.

Recommendations

Word-of-mouth is a handy marketing tool because it means people have already transacted with a particular mortgage broker and they are overall pleased with his performance. Seek recommendations from family and friends, and check the broker’s online star ratings and reviews.

Integrity and open communication

All forms of investment involve money, effort, and time. A professional mortgage broker must be reliable and trustworthy to handle your investments. Likewise, these middlemen must maintain constant communication with lenders and borrowers alike.

It’s easy to get intimidated when big numbers come into the picture. But with Canadian Mortgages, Inc., whether it’s customizing a loan or looking for alternative lending options, interest rates, home equity opportunities, or debt consolidation plans, the help that you need is readily available with a professional mortgage broker.

Source: Canadian Mortgages Inc. – 23 July, 2018 / by Glenn Carter

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