Most landlords plan to ban cannabis use in rental units: Survey

marijuana

Ahead of legalization, most property owners believe cannabis use will decrease the value of their residential assets

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The majority of landlords polled in a new survey have responded negatively to cannabis use in rental units, going so far as to offer lower rent to tenants who agree to not smoking in units.
The survey conducted by real estate website Zoocasa was conducting in anticipation of cannabis legalization, coming into effect across Canada tomorrow (October 17).
A whopping 88 per cent of landlords say they plan to prohibit smoking in their buildings, with 65 per cent willing to consider lowering rent for tenants who don’t smoke cannabis inside their suites. Sixty-four per cent of Canadians agree that building management or strata councils should have the right to ban cannabis use.
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Tenants seem to be on the same page – with only 35 per cent of respondents who identify as renters affirming their right to smoke cannabis inside their homes.
Stigma towards cannabis use remains high among homeowners and buyers, despite impending legalization; sixty-four per cent of property owners still believe smoking inside of homes with decrease the property’s value. Fifty-seven percent believe growing cannabis inside a home for personal use would decrease its resale value. Prospective buyers agree, with 52 per cent saying they’d be less likely to purchase a home if they knew marijuana had been cultivated there.
Cannabis retailers are also seen as less-than-desirable neighbors, with only 31 per cent of Canadians comfortable living near one. Fifty per cent of Generation Xers (those born between 1961 and 1981) believe a dispensary in the neighbourhood would devalue their home.
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Zoocasa conducted the online survey of more than 1,300 Canadians from Sept. 27 to Oct. 3.
Source: Western Investor- Tanya Commisso October 16, 2018
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Kid-friendly condo features

Condo living: it’s not just for young single people anymore. In big cities like Toronto and Vancouver, many millennial parents are choosing to set down roots in vertical communities, raising their kids in the dynamic environment they love. As a result, developers are starting to pay attention to the priorities of this up-and-coming homebuying demographic. Is city living suited to your family’s lifestyle? Here are six features to look for when hunting for a family-friendly condo.

FAMILY-FRIENDLY FEATURE NO. 1: More bedrooms

As recently as 2011, many condo-dwelling families had to rely on design hacks to carve out “bedroom” space in a smaller unit. That’s because during the 2001-11 period, less than one per cent of condos on the Toronto market had three bedrooms; today, for example, one major developer dedicates, on average, about 10 per cent of its new buildings to three-bedroom units, and roughly 40 per cent to two-bedroom units. Similar changes have been afoot in Canada’s other major condo markets. The City of Vancouver mandated in 2016 that all rezoning projects hit a target of 35 per cent “family units,” defined as units with two or more bedrooms. In Montreal, developers are also reaching out to the urban family demographic, with one Habitat Design Award-nominated project incorporating not just three-bedroom but even four-bedroom units. Family-sized condos are now easier to find, which means it is less likely you’ll have to use bookcases and curtains to fake out an extra bedroom.

FAMILY-FRIENDLY FEATURE NO. 2: Better storage

A tiny hall closet just won’t do when you’ve got strollers, trikes and other gear to stash. If you’ve got a growing family, maximum closet capacity is key. One way developers max out storage space is to design smaller bedrooms; that’s a small sacrifice to make if it makes getting in and out of your unit easier each day.

FAMILY-FRIENDLY FEATURE NO. 3: Indoor play zones

Just as the party room is a grown-up condo mainstay, indoor kids’ rooms are becoming hot tickets in family-oriented condo developments. With activity-friendly flooring, furniture and play stations, these indoor play centres are the perfect spot to hang out during a rainy morning or to meet up when you think your home is too messy for a play date!

FAMILY-FRIENDLY FEATURE NO. 4: Outdoor play areas

Many planned communities include parks and playgrounds in their adjacent outdoor space. Other kid-pleasing features include gardens, fountains, splash pads and pathways where kids can bike, in-line skate and play safe from car traffic. Who says you can’t have your own backyard if you live in a highrise?

FAMILY-FRIENDLY FEATURE NO. 5: Parking

If moving your brood around includes four wheels, you’ll be looking for a parking spot. Parking is a hot commodity, and many big-city condo buildings have significantly fewer parking spots than they do units. Keep in mind that a parking spot isn’t just a one-time purchase; it’s subject to additional monthly maintenance fees. If you’re an occasional driver, check the building’s proximity to a car share location. Avid cyclist? Look for a building with a secure bike room to avoid condo clutter and cut the risk of bike theft outdoors.

FAMILY-FRIENDLY FEATURE NO. 6: Location, location, location

One of the perks of urban living is proximity to work and big-city attractions. There’s something appealing about walking to the museum on a Saturday morning, or picking your kids up at daycare after work and leisurely strolling to a nice restaurant for dinner. Consider walkability and access to public transit when condo shopping. Trimming your commute and streamlining your day makes family life less stressful and way more fun.

Source: HomeOwnership.ca

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MultI-generational home purchases

Buying a house with Mom and Dad? In competitive housing markets, this seemingly unconventional choice can be a smart strategy for attaining homeownership sooner. That said, any financial partnership requires planning. Avoid conflict by clarifying roles and formalizing financial agreements. Here are two common shared homeownership scenarios, along with tips for making a financial arrangement that works for everyone.

FAMILY HOMEOWNERSHIP SCENARIO NO. 1:
Housing your child during university

Why: Renting can be expensive. Some parents may prefer to buy a home for their child while they attend university or college. This option allows families to build their own equity, rather than pay a landlord rent for three to five years or more.

Important considerations:
  • Size & lifestyle: Choose a home that is appropriate for a single young adult, such as a turnkey condo or small bungalow.
  • Future plans: What will happen once your child graduates? Will the property be sold? Will your child take over the mortgage payments? Discuss future plans openly to avoid unpleasant surprises.
  • Written agreement: Use a written agreement to solidify co-ownership responsibilities and expectations, including who is financially responsible for specific homeownership expenses (i.e., mortgage, utilities, taxes and so on), what happens if payments are missed, and what happens if either party wishes to exit the financial partnership.

Ask your mortgage professional about… Genworth Canada’s Family Plan program. This program enables qualified buyers with excellent credit to assist an immediate family member with their home purchase. To qualify, your dependent must have good credit, even if they lack sufficient income to meet typical mortgage qualification standards. The home must meet certain quality criteria, and qualified buyers can make their purchase with as little as five per cent down.

FAMILY HOMEOWNERSHIP SCENARIO NO. 2:
Parents and adult children living together

Why: Forget fleeing the nest. Increasing numbers of adult children are buying a bigger nest with Mom and Dad (maybe even Nan and Gramps too!). According to the 2016 census, a whopping 403,810 households across Canada are multi-generational households with at least three generations of the same family under one roof. Whether you’re inspired by tradition, cost savings or convenience, shared homeownership can be a prudent and fulfilling decision.

Important considerations:
  • Size & lifestyle: Upfront, family members should be on the same page about living arrangements. Will this be a one-household home with shared living quarters? Or will the property be divided into suites, with each household residing in a self-contained unit?
  • Future plans: Involve the whole family in discussions around shared homeownership and include adult siblings who are not buying in with you. Be frank about family assets and the future care needs of older relatives. Is there an expectation that you shoulder this responsibility due to proximity?
  • Written agreement: As with any shared homeownership situation, clarify co-ownership responsibilities and expectations in a written agreement.

Ask your mortgage professional about… Genworth Canada’s Progress Advance program, which helps qualified homebuyers finance a custom-built home with as little as five per cent down. Dual master suites? A bachelor-size nanny suite? An approved home builder or contractor can create a house perfect for your multi-generational family’s needs.

Or, if you’d prefer to renovate a resale home, ask about Genworth Canada’s Purchase Plus Improvements (PPI) program, which can finance home improvements and combine them with your mortgage in one easy mortgage, also with as little as five per cent down. Check out our PPI calculator and guide at homeownership.ca/ppi.

Finally, if your family has immigrated to Canada within the last five years, consider Genworth Canada’s New to Canada program. Don’t let a lack of Canadian credit history derail your family’s homeownership dreams. The New to Canada program can help qualified borrowers who have full-time employment and a strong history of rent and utility payments in Canada buy their family home with as little as five per cent down.

Source: HomeOwnership.ca 

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Second mortgages in Canada: 6 reasons you may need one

We’re living in a world where certain financial obligations must be settled on time. It could be college tuition, renovation costs, emergency repair bills, debt consolidation or even paying for a wedding. Whatever it is, it can’t wait, and it needs to be resolved as soon as possible.

As the saying goes, time waits for no one. And, neither do the bills lurking around the corner.

So what are your options? You may think of getting another credit card, but you’re past the limit or have a poor credit score. Traditional lenders have turned you down too, and you couldn’t be more disappointed.

However, if you’re a Canadian currently paying for a primary mortgage, you could have an ace in the hole to sort out your financial hurdles. This is where a second mortgage comes in.

What are second mortgages?

A second mortgage is a secondary loan held on top of your current mortgage. A different mortgage lender will typically provide this product. It’s important to note that second mortgages have their own rates and terms, and is paid independently of your primary mortgage.

In layman’s terms, second mortgages are loans that are secured by your home equity. Usually, you can acquire up to 80 percent of your home equity through a second mortgage and if you’re in a major city, up to a maximum of 85 percent.

In contrast to the primary mortgage, a second mortgage has its own terms and conditions. Hence, the second mortgage is paid separately with different rates from the first mortgage. Nonetheless, in case of a default, the second mortgage will only be repaid after the primary mortgage has been sorted out.

So what are some of the reasons you may need a second mortgage?

1. You want to pay off high-interest consumer debt

A recent report released by Statistics Canada shows that for every dollar of disposable income, Canadians owe $1.68 in credit market debt. In fact, Statistics Canada estimates that the accumulated consumer credit is $627.5 billion; not including mortgages. If you’re an average working Canadian, it is very likely that you have consumer debt.

Keep in mind that the average credit card interest rate in Canada is 19.99 percent. Of course, the longer you delay the payment, the more you keep paying higher interest rates. No wonder, most Canadians prefer low-interest credit cards.

However, there is another option. Even though the interest rate of a second mortgage is higher than the primary mortgage, it is lower than the accrued interest on credit cards and personal loans. A minimum payment of a second mortgage can be much lower than that of a credit, creating better cash flow for the borrower.

That means you can acquire a second mortgage to pay off high-interest consumer debt and save a lot of money in the long-run.

2. You have a poor credit score

According to the Huffington Post, the average Canadian credit score is 600 points. If you’re a Canadian, anything below 650 points is considered a bad credit score and you will probably find it challenging to obtain new credit.

Maybe it was that single loan that you defaulted for a month or that credit card charge-off—as long as you have a poor credit score, you will likely be the last in line when applying for loans.

The good news is that you can get a second mortgage even with a poor credit score. The lender can overlook the poor credit score based on your consistency on paying the primary mortgage and if you have a lot of home equity, albeit the interest rate will be higher due to the risk involved.

If you can pay off bad credit loans and defaulted debts by leveraging a second mortgage, you can start to repair your credit.

3. You’ve been turned down by traditional lenders

You never know when mortgage rules will change. Since the recent strict new rules on mortgage lending, more Canadians have been turned down by traditional lenders. In fact, mortgage brokers reckon that the rejection rate has increased by 20 percent. Even those who were approved for a mortgage before 2018 can have their mortgage renewal or refinance request turned down due to the stress test.

So what should you do if you’ve been turned down by traditional lenders? Simple; apply for second mortgages offered by private lenders. Unlike traditional banks, private lenders don’t have their hands tied down by the new OSFI rules.

4. You need funds quickly

There are many reasons why you would need quick funds. Perhaps you’ve experienced an unexpected tragedy or looking for a new job, and you need quick cash until you’re back on your feet.

You could go for an unsecured loan, but you don’t want to end up paying high-interest rates. Payday loans are even worse, the fees and interest rates are exaggerated. Even if you did get a payday loan, the credit limit is $1500, and you probably need more than that.

What about RRSP withdrawal? Well, you will get penalty taxes for making that early withdrawal. For instance, if you withdraw $30,000, you will only receive $21,000 after the bank remits $9000, or 30 percent, to the government.

On the other hand, second mortgages will give you liquidity to your home equity without too much interest rates or taxes especially if the amortization is short-term.

5. You want to avoid high mortgage penalties

Prepaying the remaining balance of a closed low fixed rate mortgage loan can be expensive for Canadians. Most lenders will impose a breakage fee if you decide to walk out of the contract before the term expires. Sometimes, the mortgage lenders can overestimate the liability and proceed to double or triple the penalties, leaving you in a tight spot.

Nevertheless, instead of pre-paying the first mortgage early and selling the house to gain funds for investment capital or debt relief, you could apply for a second mortgage to access the funds and wait a little longer. A short-term second mortgage would prove to be cheaper than paying the high mortgage penalties.

6. You want to outsmart PMI

Canadians who can’t afford 20 percent down payment of the property’s value when applying for a mortgage are required to pay private mortgage insurance (PMI). There are also borrowers who don’t want to give out the 20 percent down payment so they can have funds for renovation and repairs. Even so, PMI premium rates aren’t cheap especially if you’re putting up 5% to 9.99% down payment.

But did you know taking a second mortgage could lower the overall mortgage expenses than going the PMI route? Despite second mortgages having higher annual payments than first mortgages, they cost less than PMI.

Consult a professional to find a convenient second mortgage

As much as applying for a second mortgage seems like a straightforward process, finding a second mortgage without professional assistance is like climbing a slippery mountain without a harness.

Every situation is different, and there are always details in the contracts that you need to understand clearly.

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Here’s What’s Happening With the Massive Britannia Farm Redevelopment Plan in Mississauga

For years, no one quite knew what would become of the 200-acre historical agricultural property known as the Britannia Farm.

Now, it looks like plans to transform the property are closer to becoming reality.

City of Mississauga council approved changing the zoning of a 32 acre parcel of land located on Britannia Farm from institutional to mixed use. That means that the city and the Peel District School Board (which owns the farm) are now free to transform the parcel of land located on the northwest corner of Hurontario Street and Bristol and move forward with a proposal to have the land include a variety of housing types, including affordable housing.

https://www.facebook.com/plugins/video.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Finsauga%2Fvideos%2F1945506232186085%2F&show_text=0&width=476The opportunity will now allow the PDSB to either look at selling or leasing the parcel for funding.

The entirety of the Britannia Farm is currently zoned as institutional, with the exception of the Cooksville Creek.

This specific parcel on the Farm has been the subject of discussions for a number of years, as approval has been necessary for a variety of components to prepare the lands. Back in 2010, the Heritage Advisory Committee needed to give the PDSB approval to move three heritage properties from the 32 acre parcel to another area of the farm.

The historic properties on the site include the red brick Britannia Schoolhouse (c. 1870), Britannia Farmhouse (c. 1860 and 1870), two-storey Gardney-Dunton House (c. 1830) and Conniver Barn (c. 1880).

The purpose of moving the heritage buildings is to clear land in order to develop housing, as well as to move the properties to a section of the farm that will be used for educational purposes. The historical portion will also include an improved Farm lane, a historic corridor that links the various zones together and connects the Farm to Hurontario Street.

However, a report at the Heritage Advisory Committee on April 10 showcased images that suggested the heritage buildings could remain where they are. In these images, buildings were simply built around the heritage properties. Councillor Carolyn Parrish expressed displeasure with the idea of building around heritage buildings and said that it would be something that could be devastating to the significance of the properties.

Most community members who attended a public meeting back in October 2017 did approve of the idea of moving the heritage properties to another place on the farm. Parrish says that, at this point in time, approximately 99 per cent of the individuals within the community are convinced that this is a good project.

As for what will happen going forward, the PDSB will look at either selling the land to a developer or leasing the lands for continuous revenue streams. Once this happens, the city will receive studies and agreements for review. New housing is a possibility, as these may include a draft plan for subdivisions and/or condos and a site plan.

There will be other reports regarding stormwater management, a feasibility study and an environmental assessment among other documentation.

Phylis Hampshire, a resident that came forward during question period, asked if the citizens of Mississauga can somehow be assured that this will be the only proposed development on the land.

It’s a very special piece of land in the middle of Mississauga, it would be nice if it could stay open,” says Hampshire.

We adopted [the land] as a future outdoor education centre. The current Peel Board Chair has done everything in her power to keep that land the way it was intended by King William the Fourth, which was for the benefit of the children of Peel,” says Parrish. “As far as selling any more pieces of land off, it’s not going to happen. This piece at the front is just so they can finance 168 acres of outdoor education centre.”

Historical properties on the farm

The development of these lands is important, as they’re located near the future Hurontario LRT stop and the soon-to-be-reinvigorated Hurontario Street corridor. For that reason, the city says the parcel must be developed with attention to its surroundings. In short, it’s an attractive yet sensitive project. Since the parcel surrounds 170 acres of historic and cultural landscape and the connection to downtown, the development should include a number of criteria discussed in the Master Plan.

The Master Plan recommends student-focused environmental and agricultural programs, the establishment of landscape zones, a development parcel that will be 32 acres in size and phased public access in partnership with the city of Mississauga.

It is recommended that the proposed development include open spaces, parks, trees, and “a place to foster community.” For example, it is recommended that parking for any of the proposed developments be primarily underground and out of view from the public realm.

One issue that came to light was a part of the report that included development of a road within the park. Parrish cautioned staff at the city, saying “an area of caution I would give to [city staff], is when you talk about the potential opportunities for future road construction, it better not be on the 168 acres [of outdoor educational space].”

Since the Britannia Farm has just received approval for the mixed use zoning, the city has taken the first step in what could be a long process. In the future, there will be more discussion on the planning of the site with developers and potential for sale of the land.

It will be interesting to see what unfolds next.

It’s a very proud day for me,” says Parrish who been on this project since she was a trustee on the school board with Councillor George Carlson.

Janet McDougall, chair of the public board, was acknowledged at the meeting for her significant contribution to the project over the years, and with McDougall retiring this year, it will be a legacy project for her as she enters retirement.

Janet I want to congratulate you myself for all your years of service, thank you, and also for protecting this jewel that our residents are very protective of as well. It’s a piece of land that people don’t want to see altered in any way, you’ve respected that and we thank you for your plans,” says Mayor Bonnie Crombie.

Editor’s Note: A previous version of this story misidentified Janet McDougall as Janice Baker, Mississauga’s city manager. We regret the error.

Source: Insauga – by Melissa Stolarz on April 22, 2018

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Rent control is doing little to curb Toronto’s soaring rents

Haider-Moranis Bulletin: In the long run, rent controls reduce the growth in available rental stock, which further accelerates the increase in rents

In April 2017, Ontario’s then-Liberal government introduced the Rental Fairness Act, which expanded rent control to all private rental units.Cole Burston/Bloomberg

Do stricter rent control laws slow the increase in residential rents? Housing advocates and left-leaning governments believe they do. However, recent data from Ontario appears to offer further proof that this is not the case.

In April 2017, Ontario’s then-Liberal government introduced the Rental Fairness Act, which expanded rent control to all private rental units. The Act restricted rent increases to 1.5 per cent in 2017 and introduced additional provisions to protect tenants from being evicted.

The Act was enacted to protect against “dramatic rent increases.” Chris Ballard, then the Minister of Housing and Poverty Reduction, claimed that the Act would ensure that Ontarians “have an affordable place to call home.”

 

The Toronto Real Estate Board’s (TREB) Rental Market Report for the second quarter of 2018 revealed that the Rental Fairness Act has had no observable impact on market-based rents, which grew at similar rates from 2017 to 2018 as they did from 2016 to 2017. In fact, three-bedroom apartments experienced a significant increase in average rents in 2018.

TREB’s data is based on its rental listing service for the Greater Toronto and surrounding areas. From April to June 2018, almost 12,000 apartments were listed while 8,497 were leased. One and two-bedroom apartments constituted the largest segments of rental units. Also, almost a thousand townhouses were listed and 665 leased for the same period.

TREB data provides more of a market-based view of the rental market than what has been reported by the CMHC. Unlike TREB, which lists market-based units (condominiums and townhouses) that are primarily owned by private investors, CMHC’s reporting of rental markets is largely for, but not restricted to, purpose-built apartment rentals.

Despite the differences in rental stock between CMHC and TREB, even CMHC’s data reveals that instead of a break, rental rates accelerated in 2017. For instance, rents for two-bedroom units increased by 3.3 and 3.2 per cent in 2015 and 2016 respectively but jumped 4.2 per cent in 2017. If proponents of stringent rent controls were hoping for a decline in rent acceleration, it didn’t happen.

The purpose-built rental universe has remained steady across most of Canada. In the Greater Toronto Area (GTA), the number of purpose-built rentals has remained around 330,000 units for more than a decade. During the same time, the number of rental condominiums in the GTA increased from under 50,000 to more than 100,000 units.

CMHC data for October 2017 reported average rents for two-bedroom units at $1,392 and $2,263 in purpose-built rental buildings and condominium apartments respectively. In comparison, TREB reported the average rent for two-bedroom condominium apartments in the fourth quarter of 2017 to be $2,627. Even for the condominium apartments, TREB reports higher rents attributed most likely to the higher quality of the underlying stock.

CMHC reported rents for purpose-built rental buildings are significantly lower because of their less than ideal location and dilapidated condition, a result of age and deferred maintenance. These buildings have remained under rent control for decades, and their owners are disincentivized to improve the quality of the rental stock. TREB data, by contrast, is based on privately owned rental condominiums whose owners, until recently, were incentivized to maintain their units in a state of good repair.

Since April 2017, condominium rentals and other dwelling types have also come under the rent control regime, thus creating the same disincentives for structural improvements of units as the ones observed for the purpose-built rentals.

The CMHC data reveals that, as expected, average rents in older buildings were lower than rents in newer buildings. Furthermore, rents on average are higher in the high-density urban core than the low-density suburbs, making suburbs significantly more affordable to rent than in or near the downtowns.

With high turnover rates where new tenants are not subjected to rent restrictions, rent controls are ineffective tools for addressing rapid rent increases. The average rent for units in purpose-built rentals and condominium apartments has risen far above the stipulated rate since the Rental Fairness Act was enacted. In the long run, rent controls reduce the growth in available rental stock, which further accelerates the increase in rents.

Rent stability is achievable primarily by increasing the supply of the rental stock. This requires changes in regulations to facilitate, instead of hindering, new residential development.

Murtaza Haider and Stephen Moranis September 5, 2018

Murtaza Haider is an associate professor at Ryerson University. Stephen Moranis is a real estate industry veteran. They can be reached at www.hmbulletin.com.

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Buyers of new condos get twice the space in Waterloo as in Toronto

Cities west of GTA gain ‘notable traction’ in sales in first six months

New condominium buyers deterred by soaring Toronto prices are apparently venturing further afield to Hamilton, Kitchener and Waterloo, which offer more bang for their buck and the promise of new transit links that will improve accessibility.

Sales of new condominiums in these areas gained “notable traction” in the first six months of the year as regional economic activity picked up and Metrolinx moved forward with its $43-billion expansion plans, according to Altus Group, a market intelligence firm.

In Kitchener, sales between January and June rose to 806 units, up 93 per cent from the same period a year earlier, while 262 units were sold in Waterloo, a 51-per-cent jump. Though sales fell more than 20 per cent in Hamilton to 360 units, the city’s condominium market remains one of the most active outside Toronto, suggesting a continued flight to affordability, said Ray Wong, vice-president of data operations at Altus.

 

“The amount of demand in downtown Toronto, especially in the office market, has been well known for the last number of years and with that, demand for housing has steadily ratcheted up,” he said. “As these outlying areas are developed with more infrastructure in terms of restaurants and retail, it’s made them a lot more attractive.”

Those areas offer another powerful draw: the chance to secure a much larger space with a limited budget.

A buyer in Toronto with $500,000 to spend would likely have to settle for a one-bedroom unit of about 521 square feet, said Kruti Desai, manager of national research insights at Altus. But the same budget in Waterloo would secure a two-bedroom unit of 967 square feet.

Those in search of even more space could consider Barrie, Brantford, Cambridge, Guelph, Kitchener and St. Catharines, where $500,000 will buy a two- or three-bedroom unit with more than 1,000 square feet of space, she said.

“Individuals can get more bang for their buck when looking outside the Toronto market,” Desai said, adding that Hamilton, Kitchener and Waterloo are seeing the greatest amount of activity.

Momentum in Kitchener-Waterloo was linked both to affordability and to the economic growth kickstarted by Kitchener’s innovation hub and Waterloo’s Idea Quarter, a growing cluster of startup and technology companies operating in former BlackBerry Ltd. buildings.

Located close to the University of Waterloo campus and a future light-rail station, the Idea Quarter has attracted a range of firms — including OpenText Corp. and Auvik Networks Inc. — that “are now successfully competing for talent against Greater Toronto Area companies, helping stimulate condominium development,” Altus said in its report.

Hamilton, meanwhile, is expected to remain an attractive place to live for professionals working in Toronto, especially those who can take advantage of flexible working arrangements, Altus said.

A spike in new condominium sales in the city during the first three months of the year was credited to Television City Phase I, a 30-storey tower released in May 2017 that has since sold 80 per cent of the units on offer. Phase Two of the project, released in March, had sold 50 per cent of its units by the end of the second quarter.

Source: Financial Post – Naomi Powell August 8, 2018

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