Toronto wages war on raccoons with new green bins

Source 680 News by News Staff

Posted Apr 9, 2015 10:21 am EDT

“We are ready. We are armed. We are motivated to show we can’t be defeated by these critters,” Tory said.

Public Works Committee discussing the $31-million, 10-year contract to produce the bins at Thursday’s meeting.

The old green bins will be recycled into new green bins.

Mayor John Tory announced a “spring 2015 offensive against raccoon nation,” as he unveiled the city’s new green bins on Thursday.

According to a staff report, the next generation of green bins will feature a rodent-resistant locking lid, which will also keep other animals, like raccoons, out.

The Public Works Committee will discuss the $31-million, 10-year contract to produce the bins at their meeting on Thursday. Click here to read the agenda item.

WATCH: City officials say the new green bins are raccoon-proof. You be the judge. Click here to watch the video.

At the news conference, Tory said defeat is not an option in the war against raccoons.

“This is really important to people,” he said.

Tory said Torontonians have done the best they can to deal with raccoons going through their garbage, but that the masked critters have “adapted very well to city life.”

“We are ready. We are armed. We are motivated to show we can’t be defeated by these critters,” Tory said.

Raccoons have persistently caused major headaches for residents as they rummage through garbage, leaving a gigantic mess. Some even have their own territory.

“I am quite seriously told they organize themselves in block-by-block formations to cause grief,” Tory said.

The raccoons are such a “formidable adversary” the city brought in leading animal behavioural specialist Dr. Suzanne MacDonald from York University to explain their behaviour.

“I think that says something. We had to enlist leading psychological academics to come in and help us understand how they behave and how we’re going to fight them,” Tory said.

MacDonald spent a few days watching raccoons try to break into the new bin, and she says they won’t be getting into them anytime soon.

“This bin is designed with the physical limitations of the raccoons in mind,” she said.

The existing bins have reached the end of their intended 10-year lifespan, and the city is taking the opportunity to use ingenuity, Tory said.

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