Advice for retirees who must answer the question: Buy, sell or rent?

It wasn’t that long ago when the outlook for retirees focused on baby boomers downsizing and moving into smaller homes in the country — trading an urban lifestyle with a relaxing, rural retirement.

Fast forward 20 years, and many retirees are opting to stay in their homes for longer: renovating, upgrading and improving accessibility along the way.

A comfortable home is a comfortable lifestyle that many are not willing, or wanting, to give up.

The definition of “old” has changed.

Joseph Segal, the founder of Kingswood Capital, has just put his tony 22,000-square -foot home in Vancouver’s west side up for sale, for $63 million.

Why? Because they are downsizing to a smaller home in Vancouver.

“I’m an old man,” said the 92-year-old Segal, and “it’s a big place.”

Many of us are living longer and have healthier lifespans with various sources of retirement income, and ultimately we will ask the question: should we buy a condo, downsize to a smaller home or cash in and rent?

All options have pros and cons.

Is a condo right for you? 

Buying a condo may mean downsizing our footprint, but in many cases it doesn’t mean downsizing the cost.

Retirement communities are being pitched to seniors across the country with promises of amenities such as entertainment, hospitals to retail.

Many choose to be closer to families along with the desire to live in accommodations that are maintenance free. It can be enticing.

On the other hand, the concern over new costs such as condo fees or retirement residence fees can be worrisome.

Is it time to downsize?

In a hot real estate market, the temptation to cash in and lock in your appreciation can be overwhelming.

But before you do, Ted Rechtschaffen, president and CEO of TriDelta Financial, said in a BNN interview to ask yourself: is the house I’m in now too large or too difficult for me to manage?

And consider where your wealth is concentrated. Do you have too much of your wealth tied up in real estate? You have to live somewhere. So do you buy or rent? Unless you plan on living in a home for at least 6 years, you might be better off renting.

Bottom line

I’ve never been a fan of trying to time the market. You have to get it right at least twice. Going in and getting out.

Consider your lifestyle, potential longevity and retirement funding options. Even if you don’t pick the peak of the market you are still holding on to the lottery ticket that doesn’t have an expiration date.

You get to cash in when you need to, or want to.

Source: CTV – Patricia Lovett-ReidChief Financial Commentator, CTV News

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