Category Archives: construction financing

Why Canadians who own Florida homes need both hurricane and flood insurance

About 3 million Canadians visit Florida every year, and thousands own property there. So with Hurricane Irma threatening to do heavy damage to the state, should those property owners have flood or hurricane insurance?

The short answer is yes, they need both.

The latest forecasts suggest Irma’s winds could carve up much of Florida’s coast, damaging property from the Florida Keys through Jacksonville, and some experts say this could become the costliest storm in U.S. history.

For Canadian owners of property in Florida, the one bit of good news is that Irma is moving swiftly and should bring less than a quarter of the rain that Hurricane Harvey dumped on Texas when it stalled over the state. South Florida is also used to flooding and has a better flood control system than Texas.

Still, Irma could still cause significant water and wind damage. That’s why property owners need to be sure they have both hurricane and flood insurance – two distinct policies, says Brad Hubbard of National Flood Experts, a U.S.-based company that helps homeowners decide what kind of disaster insurance they need.

“If you have home insurance or even hurricane coverage, it does not cover flood. And flood insurance does not cover hurricane (damage). They are two, totally separate policies,” he told CTV Toronto from Tampa, Fla.

For Canadian snowbirds hoping to buy last-minute coverage before Irma hits, they will find they are out of luck. Most flooding polices must be purchased 30 days before a storm.

Property owners in areas known as Special Flood Hazard Zones are required to have federal flood insurance, through the National Flood Insurance Program (only a few private insurers offer flood insurance in Florida.).

In fact, U.S. mortgage lenders are required to make sure property owners living in flood hazard zones have the insurance in order to qualify for federally-backed loans.

Yet, according to an investigation by The Associated Press, just 42 per cent of homes in Florida’s 38 coastal counties are covered. In the counties currently under partial evacuation orders, only 34.3 per cent have proper coverage.

With storms becoming more severe and arriving more unpredictably, purchasing flood insurance is simply a smart investment for Canadians, says Hubbard.

Because Florida is particularly vulnerable to hurricane damage, many private insurance companies are reluctant to offer coverage to property owners who live in southern, coastal areas of the state.

That’s in part why the Florida state government created Citizens Property Insurance Corporation, a non-profit government agency that provides insurance to owners unable to find insurance in the private market.

Citizens’ spokesperson, Michael Peltier, says insurance premiums can vary depending on the type and the location of a property. He says premiums for “multi-peril insurance” — which includes hurricane coverage — in Miami-Dade County, for example, can range from an average of US$930 for a condominium unit, to $3,400 for a single-family home.

The same insurance in Orlando, Orange County, will cost an average of $1,400 for a single family home, simply because the county is further inland.

He recommends that Canadians who own property in Florida should ensure they are fully protected, before storms like Irma arrive.

“We would urge them to contact their insurance agent to make sure they have the coverage they need,” he told CTVNews.ca.

Source; With a report from CTV Toronto’s Pat Foran and files from The Associated Press

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When planning home improvements, finding a reliable contractor is an important first step

Hiring the right contractor can make all the difference when renovating your home

Skyrocketing Toronto real estate prices are motivating many existing homeowners to improve their homes, rather than replace them. “We’re seeing a big trend to add value to homes through renovations and to increase living space by building ‘up or out,’” said Kris Potts, president of Toronto’s Norseman Construction & Development. “In doing so, existing homeowners are achieving the living space improvements they would normally seek by moving to another home, but at a much lower cost.”

Whether the homeowner’s goal is to add living space by ‘building up or out’ or just to bring kitchens, bathrooms, and other rooms up to 2017 standards, their biggest challenge is often finding a contractor who can be trusted to do the job right; on time and on budget.

With an impressive 83 per cent score on the consumer rating site HomeStars.com, Norseman Construction & Development is one such contractor. Established in 2005, this family-owned-and-operated company listens to its customers throughout the design and build process; keeping them constantly informed about their project’s progress until it is completed, and each customer has received exactly what they asked for.

“We do our best to take each homeowner’s vision and make it a reality, ensuring that the finished product exceeds their expectations,” said Potts. “We do this by keeping on top of the perpetual advancements in the field, and by addressing the constantly changing needs of local homeowners. Add Norseman’s wealth of experience, superior workmanship and unparalleled attention to detail, and we are able to provide our customers with innovative solutions, competitive pricing and timely results on all their home improvement projects.”

Norseman’s attention to customer needs starts with the company’s consultation process. “Book an appointment on our website, and one of our skilled estimators will come to your home to provide a free quotation on whatever you have in mind,” said Kevin Potts, Norseman’s Operations Manager. “We will do our best to come up with a plan that not only meets your needs, but also fits within your budget and schedule.”

Once the home improvement project is underway, Norseman keeps customers ‘in the loop’ about the project’s progress on a daily basis. “Our people use a program called Buildertrend to upload status reports and photos of each day’s work,” Kevin Potts said. “Our homeowners can log into it as often as they wish to see firsthand how their build is going, and to get answers to any questions they may have.”

“Today’s homeowner is very savvy, thanks to all the home improvement shows on TV,” said Becky Potts, Norseman’s Marketing Manager. “Here at Norseman, we respect this level of awareness by giving homeowners open access to information about their projects at all times. Check out our Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter pages, and you will see our customer-first values in action!”

‘Customer-first values’ is a phrase that means something at Norseman Construction & Development. It is why this contractor provides a two-year warranty on its work – many other contractors only provide a year’s coverage.

It is also why the Potts family insists on alerting customers to project-related issues should they occur. All construction projects carry with them some element of the unknown. Opening walls or floors can bring to light new information not present at the project’s beginning. “Setbacks happen,” said Kris Potts. “When they do, we tell the customer about them upfront, and we fix them in consultation with the customer.”

As well, customer-first values drive Norseman’s approach to its skilled tradespeople. “Unlike some other contractors who are focussed on profits first, Norseman treats its trades fairly,” said Kevin Potts. “In return, we inspire loyalty in the most skilled tradespeople in the industry. The payoff is the best quality work on our customers’ homes.”

That’s not all: Norseman invests money and time in ‘giving back’ to the GTA community. Its charitable efforts include underwriting the annual free Messiah for the City Christmas concert for clients and staff of the United Way. This much-loved music is performed by the Toronto Beach Chorale and members of the Toronto Symphony Orchestra. Norseman also supports Habitat for Humanity, which aids low-income families in attaining affordable housing; serves hot meals at the Scott Mission, and funds numerous local sports and charity events in the GTA.

“The way we treat our customers and our community underscore what Norseman Construction & Development stands for,” concluded Kris Potts. “When you hire us for your home improvement project, you will receive quality-oriented, customer-focussed service from a stable firm that truly puts you first, and who cares about the community we all live in.”

For more information about Norseman & Construction & Development, visit their website or connect on Facebook.

This story was created by Content Works, Postmedia’s commercial content division, on behalf of Norseman Construction.

Source: National Post

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The Role of Appraisals How do the three main types of building appraisal work?

Whether it’s a retail strip plaza, a mall, an agricultural compound, a single family home, or an industrial building of 5,000 or one million square-feet, getting an appraisal is an important first step in any property acquisition process. In order to learn how to weight the importance of different factors when forming their opinion on value, registered appraisers go through a stringent examination process.

When determining the value of a property or building, there are several methodologies that qualified appraisers have to choose from, which are driven by the scope of the assignment and the property type.  The first is the ‘Direct Comparison Approach’; a methodology whereby the appraiser develops an opinion of value by analyzing completed sales, listings or pending sales of properties that are similar to the subject property. “Estimates of market rent, expenses, land value, cost, depreciation and other value parameters may be derived using a comparative technique,” explains Dan Brewer, President of the Appraisal Institute of Canada (AIC) and licensed mortgage and real estate broker.

Another methodology commonly adopted by appraisers is the ‘Cost Approach’, which considers the land and building components separately, and reaches a value conclusion by adding these estimates together to form an opinion. “Like the Direct Comparison Approach, the Cost Approach is based on a comparison of the cost to replace the subject (cost new) or the cost to reproduce the subject (substitute property),” Brewer says. “The total cost estimate is adjusted by deducting the accrued depreciation (i.e., physical wear and tear, functional deficiencies and external influences) of the dwelling and the site improvements (e.g., garage, deck, pool, etc.). The Cost Approach is most reliable when a property is newer due to the lower depreciation, although it’s generally not a weighted approach.”

The third methodology is the ‘Income Approach’, which is used to determine the valuations of income-producing properties. “Typically purchased as investments, the earning potential is an important element affecting the value of these properties,” says Brewer. “Through the Income Approach, the appraiser analyzes a property’s annual income and expenses to convert the net income into a present value. This methodology is typically not applied when valuing a residential property.”

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How to choose the right home for your budget

how-to-choose-the-right-home-for-your-budget

As a first-time homebuyer, affordability is an important factor when purchasing the right home. Wondering how to find the right home for your budget? Try our three-step plan for determining how much home you can afford, so you can choose – and successfully close on – the right home for your lifestyle and price point.

 

Step 1: Dream it 

It’s easy to get caught up in other people’s ideas of the perfect starter home – design magazines and TV programs sell you on what’s hot now. Ignore the hype and sit down to itemize what’s most crucial to you and your family. Make a list of your top priorities, so you can find the right home for your budget.

Here are some key issues to consider.

Transportation

Do you need easy access to public transportation? Is dedicated parking for your car essential, or will street parking suffice? Would a secure bike locker be crucial to your commute

Recreation

Do you need a walkable park for your kids or dog? Would an on-site gym help you manage your hectic schedule?

Space

How many bedrooms do you need now? What about three to five years from now? (That is, is a baby on the horizon?) Do you need a home office for your side gig? Is a big, open-plan main floor essential, given your high-volume entertaining?

Lifestyle

Do you have the time and inclination to sacrifice hours each week to maintain a house and yard? Would you rather come home after work to a turnkey property each night? Do you want a condo with all the amenities, or would you sacrifice bells and whistles for a lower maintenance fee?

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Look over your list and differentiate between the must-haves and the nice-to-haves. Chances are, you might not find your entire wish list on a starter-home budget, so it’s important to know your priorities.

Step 2: Crunch some numbers

Just as important as knowing what you need in a first home is knowing what you can afford. Price dictates not only how much home you can buy but also what neighbourhoods you should be looking in.

Sit down with your partner to assess your income, debts, savings and investments, so you can anticipate how much money will be available for a down payment, and how much you can afford to pay each month in home carrying costs (mortgage payments, taxes, heating, etc.).

how-to-choose-the-right-home-for-your-budget

Work out the monthly budget you’ll need to cover your responsibilities as a new homeowner, and start living on it now, so you can see how sustainable it is. If you find that it’s cramping your lifestyle, you will have to reassess whether homeownership is right for you, or consider a lower-priced home. 

Step 3: Assemble your real estate pros 

Once you’re ready to buy, build your real estate team: a REALTOR® or real estate agent, a mortgage specialist, a home inspector and a real estate lawyer (or notary, in Quebec). These are the pros you’ll count on to get you the keys to the right home for your budget.

Your first point person is your REALTOR® or real estate agent. Be forthright about your priorities and budget, as well as the neighbourhoods you’d like to live in. A REALTOR®’s insights are priceless, especially as they pertain to affordability. BONUS: A good REALTOR® will have the inside scoop on up-and-coming neighbourhoods that offer more bang for your homebuying buck.

The mortgage specialist is your next priority because mortgage pre-approval is essential in today’s real estate market. While it’s useful to attend open houses and check listings beforehand, most sellers won’t consider offers from potential buyers without pre-approval. Your mortgage broker will also have real-world insights into affordability, so tap into that resource early.

Next, have that home inspector on speed dial to ensure that any home you make an offer on is a home you can afford – without any major hidden costs (such as faulty wiring, asbestos or termite damage in need of remediation).

Finally, a real estate lawyer (or a notary, in Quebec) will ensure that things run smoothly with your real estate transaction, including researching the title, checking whether there are liens against the property, and verifying the accuracy of legal descriptions of the property. The lawyer also makes sure that everyone is paid appropriately, so you can take ownership of your first home without any financial bumps.

 

Source: Genworth – HomeOwnership.ca

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Mike Holmes: You’ll get renovation stress, but here’s how to mitigate it

Living through a renovation puts a lot of stress on relationships. I’ve seen couples argue, and sometimes it’s so bad it can really test your relationship. The best thing you can do to avoid that is plan, plan, plan. The time you put into planning your renovation will determine its success. You must discuss everything with your partner, as well as your contractor. Talk about design choices, materials, expectations, what you’re willing to compromise on and your must-haves. Once you and your partner are on the same page, then do your homework.

Research and educate yourself on everything there is to know about the project — the trades you will need and when, all materials, the products you want, proper installation, warranties. Most people focus on the finishes — that’s the icing — but the bulk of your research should be on the right construction and materials that will support those finishes and make them last.

Some people will take all the right steps preparing for a renovation — they’ll discuss their budget, figure out if they need a construction loan, they’ll go over timelines, plus when they expect work to start and finish by. But once the reno starts, there are a lot of unexpected issues that can come up.

Before any work can start, everything must be cleared away from the area that will be renovated, plus the path leading to it. You must have a plan for storing all your furniture and appliances.

Where will you keep it all? Do you need movers? Do you need to rent a storage space? You should be discussing this with your contractor, too.

Also, where will you be living once construction starts? Some people think they can just stay home. I wouldn’t recommend it. Dust and noise will be a constant issue and mechanics, such as electricity, heating and water, typically get shut off — talk about an inconvenience! Plus, if the construction crew has to clean up at the end of every workday, because you’re living at home during construction, that adds extra labour costs.

Renovations aren’t a perfect science
and sometimes things happen

Let’s say you have a place to stay during construction. In most cases, it won’t be comfortable, which can put more stress on couples. When my son was renovating his house, he stayed in a Winnebago with his girlfriend. It was small, they didn’t have all their stuff and he was dragging in all kinds of dirt from the job site — it’s not an ideal situation.

And what do you do if construction goes longer than expected? Renovations aren’t a perfect science and sometimes things happen — like unexpected or emergency repairs that push your timeline, and budget, way beyond what you originally thought. Be prepared for the unexpected.

If you’re lucky enough to be staying at someone’s house, such as your in-laws, it can still be stressful. For one, it not only screws up your entire daily routine but also inconveniences other people. I remember one homeowner tearing up talking about staying at their in-laws during their renovation, and her daughter couldn’t play or dance for months because of boxes everywhere.

Even years after the job was done, the family was still recovering emotionally.

Changes to construction schedules and emergency repairs are another set of unexpected issues you could face. Anyone renovating their home should know that this can happen. You need a

Plan B in case it does. What things can you live without if you need to pull money for an unexpected repair? Are you willing to compromise on the finishes so you can stay within your budget, or will you go over it? If you do, what does that mean for you and your partner?

A successful renovation starts with plenty of planning, which takes time to do right — sometimes it can take months! But even all the planning in the world can’t prepare you for the unexpected. When that happens, communication is key, with your partner and your contractor.

Watch Mike Holmes and his son, Mike Jr., on Holmes and Holmes Thursdays at 10 p.m. on HGTV. For more information, visit makeitright.ca.

Source: Mike Holmes, Special to National Post | November 26, 2016 

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Mike Holmes: Asbestos is like a sleeping monster best left undisturbed lest danger ensues

Many building materials, including some drywall compounds, can contain asbestos, which is why it's important for all crews working on older homes to wear protective safety gear, including respirators.

Mike Holmes: Asbestos is like a sleeping monster best left undisturbed lest danger ensues | National Post

The National Day of Mourning is on April 28 — that’s a time to remember those people who have been affected by workplace injuries or death. It serves as a reminder for all of us to make sure we have the right processes and systems in our workplace to prevent illnesses, injuries and even deaths.

Some of the biggest threats on the job site are the ones you can’t see, such as asbestos.

What makes asbestos so dangerous is its fibres.

Asbestos is a generic term that refers to a number of different mineral fibres. Because of their strength, durability and resistance to fire, these fibres were used widely in building materials and added to residential construction products.

It wasn’t until the late 1970s when it became known that asbestos posed a serious health risk, and since then it has been banned from building materials. It was used in vermiculite insulation, insulation around pipes and water tanks, roofing compounds, shingles, sealants, caulking, adhesives, vinyl tiles, drywall compounds, even some electrical parts.

When asbestos fibres are disturbed, they are released into the air, and if they’re inhaled they can get trapped in the lungs and cause serious health issues, including cancer.

Canada has one of the highest rates of mesothelioma, which is a type of cancer caused by asbestos.

Although asbestos isn’t currently used in construction materials, there are many older homes that still contain it. Any home built before 1980 should be professionally checked for asbestos, especially if a renovation or home improvement is planned. (Getting these materials properly removed by a professional company through remediation can drive up the cost of your reno.)

Canada has one of the highest rates of mesothelioma, which is a type of cancer caused by asbestos.

Professionals can take samples from suspect materials, such as walls, ceilings, vinyl floor tiles, siding, insulation and roofing materials. These samples are then sent to a laboratory for analysis. If the presence of asbestos is confirmed in any of the samples, don’t disturb the materials —­ whether by sanding, cutting, sawing or removing it; leave it to the professionals.

Some people might panic and start ripping out the material and products themselves, but that is not at all advisable. Disturbing asbestos and materials that contain asbestos is what makes it dangerous. That’s why contractors and their crews should always wear protective clothing and gear, especially during demolition. You never know what might be found, and what might be a hazard.

If a material that contains asbestos is in good condition, it might not need to be removed; however, it’s important to monitor it for signs of deterioration, because as soon as any fibres get loose, issues can start to arise.

There are some temporary fixes to prevent asbestos-containing materials from getting damaged and fibres getting loose, but they should only be done a professional contractor. Dealing with asbestos-containing material is never DIY.

Whenever hiring a pro to work on your home, always make sure they’re qualified to do the job right, which includes taking the proper safety precautions and knowing how to deal with potentially hazardous materials, like asbestos, the right way.

Ask what type of safety gear they normally use during demolitions, and the course of action they would take if they suspect any material contains asbestos. A contractor who doesn’t make the health and safety of their own crew a priority will likely not care about yours either, so do your homework. Ask if they have a professional asbestos abatement company that they normally work with. Who are they and what are their credentials? What’s their track record? Your contractor should be able to talk to you, not just about doing the job right but also about proper cleanup and safe disposal of materials.

Asbestos in homes and on the job site is a health risk. Too many contractors have years taken off their lives because they didn’t protect themselves with the right safety gear, such as gloves, safety glasses and of course respirators. Doing a job right means doing it safe. It protects homeowners and pros, too.

Source: National Post. Watch Mike Holmes in his series, Holmes Makes It Right, on HGTV. For more information, visit makeitright.ca.

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The rise of Willowdale, Toronto’s hottest new neighbourhood

Infill houses line much of the block of Elmwood Ave., across the street from 165 Elmwood Ave., an original North York backsplit that just sold in Oct. 2015 for $1.5 million.

Builders are always looking for bargains, so it caused quite a stir when a pleasant backsplit went on the market in North York’s Willowdale area earlier this month for what may have seemed like a crazy amount to anyone else — $1.1 million.

It didn’t matter that its four bedrooms featured a virtual rainbow of wall-to-wall carpeting, or that its panelled kitchen was far more dated than designer.

All that counted to the dozens of interested builders who filed through the front door the first two frantic days was the patch of grass and asphalt on which the house has stood since 1961 — all 40 by 131 feet of it.

By Day 3 some 17 offers had been registered. The best was for $1.551 million — more than $400,000 over the asking price.

“Seventeen isn’t so crazy. That’s happening a lot here now,” says long-time next-door neighbour Johnny Yoon, who is also a realtor in this booming Yonge St. and Sheppard Ave. area.

This once-sleepy suburban neighbourhood is one of the hottest real estate markets in Toronto right now, partly due to demand from wealthy Persians and Chinese.

All that foreign interest has spurred a staggering remake of this quiet residential pocket that started some years ago but has exploded, this year in particular, in bidding wars for its relatively tiny postwar homes, simply because of lots, which tend to average 50 feet, but can stretch in some cases to 70 or 90 feet.

It’s also helped skew overall real estate values for Toronto as original houses are replaced with new ones coming on the market at two to three times the former price.

Willowdale is far from alone. Rebuilds have broken out all along aged City of Toronto streets as builders cash in on the massive move to intensification across the region and a greenbelt that has set firm parameters on how much land is left for residential development.

“You’re just seeing a lot of market forces at play now,” says land economist Mark Conway of N. Barry Lyon Consultants, who’s seen a significant pickup in teardowns in his own Scarborough Bluffs neighbourhood.

“It’s pretty easy for me to understand why people are doing this — the economics are completely in line with the market when you consider that a detached house in the City of Toronto is worth over $1 million now.

“It’s definitely changing the character of neighbourhoods and it’s certainly not good for affordability. But it’s inevitable. We’re becoming a victim of our own success as a city.”

Values have especially skyrocketed in central Willowdale because its quiet, tree-lined streets are close to two subway lines (Yonge and Sheppard), highways, top-ranked schools and a host of big-city amenities — all of that now at a discount, thanks to the weak Canadian dollar.

Peyvand Jalali, one of the top real estate agents in the area has a roster of developers looking for original homes to raze and rebuild. Land values alone have escalated so dramatically the last couple of years in this area just east of the North York Civic Centre that Jalali says banks are appraising most original homes at 97 per cent land value.

That means a developer can buy an existing home for $1.5 million, tear it down, build a top-of-the-line new 3,000- or 4,000-square-foot home and make $500,000-plus, with prices now heading north of $3 million for rebuilds here boasting suburban-style basics like grand family rooms, granite-clad kitchens and spacious ensuite bathrooms.

All the demand is also being felt at city hall, where applications for zoning variances are up dramatically and there’s growing pressure from builders to go bigger than ever or sever 50-foot lots and build two homes, instead of one.

“It’s just becoming the Wild West,” says area councillor John Filion who has a dedicated staff member charged with keeping on top of rebuilding requests.

“We have bylaws for a reason and you are supposed to have a good reason to vary them, and a good reason isn’t because you want to make more money.”

Some realtors have taken to going door-to-door, says Jalali, searching for owners of original homes willing to sell. Developers like Kingsgate Luxury Homes, which didn’t return phone calls from the Star, simply post signs at existing build sites: More Lots Wanted.

All those new builds aren’t all bad, stresses land economist Conway.

Much of the city’s housing stock is aging out and not built to modern standards. They are tiny for today’s families, lack ensuite bathrooms and workable kitchens but, more importantly, they “just aren’t healthy.

“They aren’t insulated properly, some have asbestos and urea-formaldehyde so there’s good reason to rebuild many of them anyway.”

Out with the old …

328 Princess Ave.

50 by 131 foot lot

Listed Feb. 26, 2015 $1.28 million

Sold Feb. 27, 2015 $1.518 million

328 Princess Ave, which sold for $1.518 million in February.

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328 Princess Ave, which sold for $1.518 million in February.

331 Princess Ave.

50 by 133 foot lot

Listed March 28, 2015 $1.288 million

Sold March 30, 2015 $1.568 million

331 Princess Ave, which sold for $1.568 million in March 2015.

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331 Princess Ave, which sold for $1.568 million in March 2015.

395 Empress Ave.

50 by 125.5 foot lot

Listed March 16, 2015 $1.288 million

Sold March 26, 2015 $1.534 million

395 Empress Ave, which sold for $1.534 million in March 2015.

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395 Empress Ave, which sold for $1.534 million in March 2015.

In with the new …

369 Hollywood Ave.

Asking price $2.89 million

Replaced original 1.5 storey, 2 bedroom house

Sold for $1.039 million in September 2013

369 Hollywood Ave, which has an asking price of $2.89 million.

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369 Hollywood Ave, which has an asking price of $2.89 million.

156 Elmwood Ave.

Asking price $3.28 million

5 bedroom, 4,000 sf-plus

Replaced original 1.5 storey, 3 bedroom house

Sold for $1.246 million in February 2014

156 Elmwood Ave, which sold for $1.246 million in February 2014.

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156 Elmwood Ave, which sold for $1.246 million in February 2014.

122 Kingsdale Ave.

Asking price $3.199 million

5 bedroom, 4,000 sf-plus

Replaced original post-war home

Sold for $1.2 million in June 2014

122 Kingsdale Ave, which sold for $1.2 million in June 2014.

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122 Kingsdale Ave, which sold for $1.2 million in June 2014.

Willowdale by the numbers

Willowdale by the numbers:

46.8 % — GTA house price growth in past 5 years

63.5 % — Willowdale house price growth in past 5 years

$230 to $250 per square foot — average cost of top-of-the-line rebuild

$1.5+ million — average price of original house on 40-foot lot

$1.7+ million — average price of original house on 50-foot lot

13 — applications to sever lots in 2012

20 — applications to sever lots just to October 2015

177 — applications for variances to build bigger homes in 2012

247 — applications for variances just to October 2015

Source: Toronto Star –  Business Reporter, Published on Sat Oct 24 2015

 

To get your construction financing request reviewed, contact the Ray C. McMillan Team to arrange your no-obligation consultation or visit www.RayMcMillan.com

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