Category Archives: credit proposals

Why your credit score matters

And how to improve it

Despite holding multiple credit products (like credit cards or lines of credit) many Canadians don’t understand how debt and their behaviour around it affects their credit score in the eyes of the credit bureau—or why it’s important; on top of that, 47% of Canadians don’t know where to check their credit score.

Your credit score is a three-digit number, between 300 and 900, that measures your creditworthiness. The higher your score the better, as it’s used by lenders and financial institutions to determine whether your credit-worthy or not. In general, a low score could mean you’re declined on a loan or receive a higher interest rate, while a higher score allows for lower interest rates and better options when it comes to things like getting a mortgage and borrowing money. Your credit score number essentially indicates how likely your are to repay money you borrow, based on how you’ve handled past financial obligations.

How is your credit score determined?

Most lenders want to see two forms of active credit for at least two years. The longer the history reporting, the better.

Your credit score is made up of the following:

  • 35% payment history. It’s important to make your payments on time. Missing a $4 dollar payment on a credit card could be as bad a missing a $400 payment, so don’t skip the minimum payment. This also includes collections. Some creditors (even city parking ticket collectors) may report that you haven’t paid them to your credit bureau, or even use a third-party collection agency to get their money back. These collections on your credit bureau can lower your score.
  • 30% utilization ratio. This is your level of indebtedness, or how much of your total available credit you’re using.
  • 15% length of credit. The longer you have an account open, the better. It shows you’re capable of managing credit responsibly.
  • 10% types of credit. It’s good to have a mix of different types of credit (revolving credit like credit cards and lines of credit are riskier than personal loans so it’s better to have fewer of those in your mix) to show that you can handle your payments.
  • 10% inquiries. These happen every time you agree to a “hard credit check”. Hard checks usually happen even when opening a chequing account with a bank or a new phone plan.

3 things that can help improve your score:

1. Practice good utilization ratio habits

A relatively fast way to improve your credit score is to start practicing good utilization ratio habits. Once you start doing this, it could improve in as little as 30-60 days. If your credit card limit is $1,000 and your balance is $1,000, your utilization ratio is 100 per cent — and this not good in the eyes of the credit bureau. Credit bureaus base credit scores on behaviour with credit. If you’re constantly maxing out your credit cards, it could imply that you’re not far away from defaulting on your minimum payments. It looks like your income is stretched. Set an imaginary limit of 70 per cent and don’t go over that. Doing this will keep your credit score healthy. For example, if your credit card limit is $10,000, don’t borrow over $7,000.

2. Think twice about closing an unused credit card

It may seem like a good idea to close a credit card that you’re not using, or have paid off and are trying not to use. But, closing a card, or leaving it inactive can negatively affect your credit score. This goes back to the length of credit factor that the credit bureau reports on which makes up 15% of your credit score. Rather than closing the card, consider using it for a monthly subscription, like Netflix or Spotify, and set up an automatic monthly payment from your bank account to ensure it’s covered. This trick will also improve your utilization ratio and payment history, since you’ll be staying far under your limit, and making on-time payments.

3. Consolidate credit card debt

Credit cards are considered revolving debt; meaning when you pay them down you can keep borrowing against them. This type of debt is psychologically proven to keep people in debt. Many revolving credit products allow you to pay back only the interest, which is a major reason why so many people find themselves stuck in what feels like an endless cycle of debt. If you’re like 46% of Canadians* and you carry a credit card balance every month, you could benefit from a personal instalment loan to help get out of the revolving debt cycle. Unlike credit card debt, an installment loan has a specific term and requires you to pay back interest and principal in every payment, which means you have a set deadline for paying it off and getting out of debt.

The first step in improving your credit score is knowing it. Mogo offers Canada’s only free credit score with free monthly monitoring. Check your score at mogo.ca.

Source: Special to Financial Post | May 6, 2017 |

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When your mortgage is more than you can handle

On paper, you could afford your mortgage. Your lender even approved the paperwork. But now that you’re settled in your home, maybe you’ve incurred some unplanned-for monthly expenses, such as higher-than-planned utility bills, property taxes that have risen (as they tend to do), or increased insurance premiums, and find that you’re unable to make your mortgage payments. If you’re not sure what to do, the first thing is not to panic. All hope isn’t lost, and you don’t have to let your home own you. You do, however, have to confront the issue head-on in order not to lose control of your finances.

If you think your mortgage is too big, here are some options and avenues to consider going forward.

  1. Budget
The first solution is the most obvious: Cut back on other expenses to try and make up for the shortfall. If you got a mortgage without properly budgeting, then it’s better late than ever. Be honest with yourself and keep track of everything you spend for one month – or even better, categorize all of your spending that took place last month so you can get a jump-start on the process. Quicken, Mint, and YNAB (you need a budget) are popular tools for tracking your spending and creating a budget. By tweaking your lifestyle and spending habits, you might be able to close the gap between the amount of money that you need for your mortgage and housing-related expenses and how much you’re spending elsewhere.

 

  1. Refinance
Refinancing is when you go back to your lender (or a new lender) and renegotiate your mortgage contract, based on your current balance and the current interest rates, before your mortgage term has expired. Note that if you refinance, you’re almost certainly going to end up paying a penalty for breaking your mortgage contract, even if you stay with the same lender. But the upside is that if you refinance at a lower interest rate than the one that’s currently being applied to your mortgage, then you can save money on your monthly payments. Another option would be switching from a fixed rate to a variable rate mortgage during a refinance, since variable rate mortgages tend to have lower interest rates than fixed mortgages. But since the interest rate on your mortgages fluctuates with the market rate, this tactic could also end up backfiring on you if interest rates go up; you’ll be forced to pay the higher interest rate and payments could end up being higher than you were previously paying. Refinancing can also be used as a tool in conjunction with budgeting, so that you withdraw some of the equity in your home to consolidate and get on top of your debt while better managing your cash flow going forward.
  1. Sell, sell, sell
It is always an option to sell your house and get a smaller one. While selling your home and pocketing the profit may seem like a good idea, the profits might not be as big as you’d expect. Between land transfer taxes, the penalty of breaking the mortgage, fees for real estate agents, and other selling expenses such as staging and/or making small repairs, you may find that your profits will be eaten into at such an extent that you can’t sell your house while generating enough cash to pay off the mortgage. Reasearching your housing market and having a frank conversation with a realtor when it comes to how much you could realistically expect to get for your home will be a big factor in determining whether or not you should sell, as well as using online calculators so that you know how much those other incidentals will impact your bottom line.

 

  1. Rent it out
Renting often gets a bad rap as the doomed fate of the poor, the irresponsible, or the nomadic. But the thing is, it’s a fiscally responsible option for many people. If your housing market isn’t favouring sellers, or you aren’t getting any response to your house being on the market, considering whether it may be an option to rent your property to a tenant and live in a less costly option, whether that be smaller or located in a less desirable area. The sale and rental markets are related, so what’s happening in one will impact the other. If your area is experiencing a slow housing market and fewer people are buying homes for whatever reason, then there may be more people who are renting, or open to the idea. Ideally, your income from the rental will cover the costs associated with your home, and all you’ll have to pay for is your new rent, which you would find at an amount that you could actually afford.
  1. Get a private loan
This is not a fail-safe option and the private lending space isn’t for undisciplined borrowers. That being said, if you have a plan, a private loan can be a good way to consolidate other high-interest debt that could free up some money that could go toward your mortgage payment if you’re suffering from a temporary setback such as making ends meet during a period where you had a loss of income, or went through a divorce.
  1. Talk to your mortgage broker
It’s all about knowing your options in this situation, and whether you want to refinance your mortgage, switch lenders, sell your home, you need to know exactly what each option is going to mean in terms of your current mortgage, which means you need to know how much the penalty is going to end up costing you in the long run. Remember, talking to your broker is free, and even though they’re not a financial planner or advisor, they can advise you as to what loans and mortgages would work best for you in your current situation.

Whatever you decide to do, you do have options. They may not always be the best options, but there are ways for you to get your head above water, even if your mortgage is too big for you. If anything, once you get on top of your situation or the next time you buy a house, you’ll know better how to anticipate your true expenses and budget for them going ahead.

Source: WhichMortgage.ca By Kimberly Greene | this page was last updated on the 25 Jan 2017

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Can I Just Walk Away From My Debts?

DEBT

I’ve had a few people say to me recently “If you have debt, just walk away; the banks won’t do anything. My friend stopped paying, and nothing happened to him. Don’t bother with credit counselling, or a consumer proposal, just walk away.” Does that strategy actually work?

The answer depends on your situation.

In some cases the “do nothing” strategy, or walking away, is a viable option.

If you owe money to a bank, they want to be repaid. If you don’t pay them, they will follow a standard sequence of events to collect their money.

The first month you miss a payment they will include a “friendly reminder” at the bottom of your statement, saying something like “this is just a friendly reminder to make your payment; if you already made your payment, please disregard this notice.”

By the second month, the note on your statement will be less friendly: “We will suspend your account if you don’t pay.”

By the third or fourth month, collection calls will start, and you may get threatening legal letters. Eventually your account may be turned over to a collection agency, and then the phone calls and letters become even more intense.

Ultimately, if you don’t pay, the bank has three options:

  1. Stop collection actions and write off your account;
  2. Continue collecting through a collection agency;
  3. Take you to court to get a judgement, which may lead to a wage garnishment.

So when would a bank simply give up? When they have no reasonable hope of collecting from you. That may happen in a variety of situations, including when:

  • The bank doesn’t know how to contact you, because you have moved and they don’t have your address or phone number;
  • They don’t know where you work, so they can’t garnishee your wages; or
  • The bank knows that you have no wages to garnishee, perhaps because you are receiving a pension.

A creditor can only garnishee your wages if you have wages. If you are unemployed, or your income is from a source other than wages from employment, such as a pension, then there are no wages to garnishee.

So the answer to the question “can I just walk away from my debts?” is “yes”, but only if you are not worried about the repercussions of walking away. If you have no assets to seize, no wages to garnishee, and you are not concerned about a low credit score, walking away is a viable option.

DEBT

However, if you have a job, or expect to have a job in the near future, or if you have assets, walking away may not be your best option, because you put yourself at risk for a wage garnishment.

If you owe money to Canada Revenue Agency and have a job, or own a house, or have a bank account, ignoring them is very dangerous. CRA can freeze a bank account or garnishee your wages without a court order.

Here’s my advice: if you have debts, attempt to work out payment arrangements directly with your creditors. They may give you a break on the interest rate or stretch out your payments to allow you to pay them in full. If you can’t make a deal with them, and if you have more debt than you can repay, don’t wait until legal action starts. A licensed insolvency trustee will provide you with a free initial consultation to review all of your options, and they can tell you if walking away is a good option.

If you are 80 years old, and your only income is CPP and OAS, and your only debt is an old cellphone bill from five years ago, walking away is probably your best option. If you are working and can’t pay, a consumer proposal or bankruptcy may be a better option than ignoring the problem and hoping that the problem goes away.

Source : Huffington Post   Licensed Insolvency Trustee, Chartered Accountant

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Secured Credit Cards: Got bad credit? You can still get a credit card…

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Secured Credit Cards

If you have bad credit, one of the best things you can do to start fixing that situation is get a credit card. Sound backwards? A new line of credit that you manage well can do a lot to increase your credit rating. And, in situations involving travel and rental cars, having a credit card makes like that much easier. So, how do you go about getting one when the numbers say no?

Start with Your Bank

If you have a good relationship with a bank, there is a chance that they might approve you for a Secured Credit Card when others won?t. Most banks have credit card offers for current account holders right on their websites. Often, when you apply online for a regular unsecured card from your bank, you can receive an answer right away. Many, if you are not granted a regular card, will automatically offer a secured card instead.

Consider a Credit Union

Credit unions are also more likely than other sources to give those with blemished records a break. One other advantage is that, because they are member organizations, you may be able to get a card with a lower rate, as well.

Read the Fine Print

If you are unable to get a regular card, a secured card may be your only option. The amount that you deposit into the account will equal your credit limit. These cards will almost always have annual fees and higher interest rates than cards available to those with better credit. Make sure you are aware of all of the fees and rules before applying for the card. Some unscrupulous companies that target those with bad credit have monthly fees that, over the course of a year, add up to two to three times the annual fee for other cards.

Pay On-Time Always and Other Rules

Once you have a card, treat your agreement with the card company with the utmost respect. Do not charge over the limit. Make your payment on time every single month. It is best to pay off in full each month and not overuse the card. The percentage of your available credit that you are using affects your credit score, so, low utilization can raise it.

Next Steps

Whether it is secured or unsecured, the credit card you get with bad credit is not going to be the best deal but will help you with the credit repair process. Spend six months to one year using the card a bit each month and paying it off in full. Then, call and ask for a better offer. If you have a secured card, ask to be approved for one that is not secured. If you were able to get one without a security deposit, ask for a higher limit and a lower interest rate. Over time, you will get access to better and better deals and expand your financial opportunities. – See more at: www.keycreditrepair.com.

Source: Real Talk Boston

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Fixing Your Credit After a Bankruptcy to Apply for a Mortgage

When I first started working with Charlie (not his real name) in 2005, his bankruptcy had just been discharged, meaning his remaining debt was cleared. His credit score was 526, and he didn’t think he had a chance to even get a credit card.

Charlie’s bankruptcy filing was needed after a difficult divorce and a medical emergency. In fact, a a majority of people who seek bankruptcy protection do so after a medical emergency, difficult divorce, job loss; or some combination of the three.

It didn’t take long for him to realize that his financial life was not over. Within a couple of months, he’d gotten more than a dozen credit card and other loan offers. After the discharge of a Chapter 7 bankruptcy, you’re considered an even better risk than someone who still has a mountain of debt because you can’t file for bankruptcy for at least eight years. In reality, you can get a credit card immediately after your bankruptcy discharge.

Many people think, That’s exactly what got me into trouble in the first place, so I’m going to avoid plastic in my life forever. That’s a huge mistake if you want to buy a house. You need to rebuild yourcredit score, and the best way to do that is to show that you can manage credit wisely. A credit card history that shows you can pay your bills on-time every month is one of the best ways to rebuild that history.

With my help, Charlie’s credit score was back to 646 in about 2½ years, which is enough to qualify for an FHA and VA loan even in today’s rough mortgage marketplace. When we checked his score in January 2011 it was back up to 727; now he can qualify for some of the best interest rates.

The key is to work on three pieces of the puzzle at the same time immediately after the bankruptcy: Clean up your credit report, begin rebuilding a positive credit history and start saving. Now that you don’t have credit bills to pay any more, start putting as much of that money aside as you can to save toward the downpayment on your next home. The more money you can put down, the better you will look to a mortgage banker.

Fix Your Credit Report

The last thing you probably want to do after a bankruptcy is to review your credit report and see all the damage that you did. Get over it. The quicker you clean up that report, the faster you will be able to improve your credit score. You can get a credit report for free from each of the credit reporting agencies at AnnualCreditReport.com. By federal law you are entitled to one free report each year.

When you get that report, review it and note any errors you see on the report. For example, you may find accounts that are not yours or lenders who reported late payments that are not accurate. The credit reporting agency will send you instructions about how to make corrections. Follow those instructions carefully and make your corrections. Send any proof you have that the account reported is incorrect. The credit reporting agencies tend to believe your creditors rather than you, so the more proof you can send the better.

In addition to making corrections, also inform the credit reporting agency of your bankruptcy and note any accounts on that report that were discharged by the bankruptcy. The credit report agency will then note the bankruptcy, and that will start the clock for the debt to be removed from your credit history. Most negative credit accounts can stay on your report for seven years from the last date of activity. A Chapter 7 bankruptcy stays on your credit report for ten years.

But as a negative mark ages on your credit report its impact on your credit score becomes less and less significant, which is why you can rebuild your credit score even before the bankruptcy drops off.

You may find that you have to go through the correction process several times. Each time the credit reporting agency fixes a report, they will send you a corrected copy. Check it again for any errors and report any remaining errors until your credit report is accurate and all your discharged accounts are noted.

Rebuild Your Credit History

While you’re working with the credit reporting agencies to clean up your credit report, you should also be working on rebuilding your credit history by opening one or two credit accounts to begin positive reporting on your credit report. Each time you pay a bill on time that will be a positive mark and will help to minimize the negative marks.

You’ll likely have to start with a secured credit card. These cards usually require an annual fee and charge higher interest rates. While they’re not the best deal out there, they may be your only choice right after a bankruptcy. After about six to 12 months of using a secured credit card on time, you should be able to get an unsecured card with better terms.

You also may be able to get a retail credit card. Don’t go overboard with getting new credit now that you can. Stick to one or two credit accounts to show you can use credit wisely and pay it on time.

Monitor Your Credit Score

As you’re rebuilding your credit score, you may want to monitor your progress. If your score continues to go up, you’re on the right track. But if you find that your score goes down in any quarter, think about your credit activities. Did you charge a large item? Did you open a new account? That way you’ll learn what does positively and negatively impact your credit score so you can be sure you have the best score before applying for that mortgage in the future.

Six months before applying for a mortgage, don’t take on any new debt and risk ruining all the work you did to rebuild your credit score. Keep your credit accounts active but your balances low to get the best credit score.

Source: AOL Real Estate – Lita Epstein Mar 4th 2011 

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Forgiven debt lingers on credit report for months

Wesley Harkness was evicted from a prior apartment he rented at 90 Jameson. The previous landlord, MetCap Living, claims he did not give them proper notice after they evicted him.

Evicted tenant was charged 2 months rent for not giving notice. The gov’t ruled this illegal, but the debt remained on his credit report for almost 3 months.

Almost three months after Wesley Harkness’ former landlord agreed to forgive his debt, the money was still outstanding on his credit report, downgrading his credit rating and harming his ability to take out a loan or get a credit card.

Only once the Star asked Equifax why his debt hadn’t been erased was the problem finally resolved.

 

Harkness’ five-year saga stands as a warning to how difficult it can be to get anything removed from your credit report – even when the debt is imposed illegally and when the lender agrees to drop the claim.

Harkness was evicted from his Jamieson Ave. apartment in 2010 and shortly afterward received a letter from his landlord demanding two months rent because he did not give proper notice.

 

MetCap, one of Toronto’s biggest corporate landlords with more than 10,000 units in the city, claimed that tenants still had to give 60 days notice to vacate an apartment,even when they were being evicted. After the Star exposed the practice in June, housing minister Ted McMeekin publically stated that it was illegal and MetCap agreed to stop pursuing evicted tenants.

 

Craig McDonald, collections manager at MetCap’s in-house collections agency, Suite Collections, sent a fax to the credit bureau Equifax on June 25th, asking that Harkness’ debt be marked as “settled.” But Equifax claims to have never received the fax.

Harkness only found out that his debt was still considered “outstanding” when he went to the Equifax office near Finch Ave. and Yonge St. to get his credit report this month, more than 11 weeks after Equifax received the request to mark it as settled.

But one debt expert says even if the debt is considered settled, “that’s not good enough.”

“There’s a distinction here between a debt being settled and if a debt should never have been put there in the first place,” said Mark Silverthorn, a former collections lawyer who quit the industry to share his insider knowledge with the public.

When a debt has been settled, it remains on your credit report for seven years, Silverthorn said. But if a debt was imposed illegally, the lender should have the debt removed from your credit report entirely.

 

“If the Ontario government has said that this practice is illegal, then there are no settlements. (The debt) shouldn’t be there,” Silverthorn said.

When the Star contacted Equifax and MetCap to inquire into the lingering debt, a second fax was sent to entirely remove the debt.

 

Equifax Vice President John Russo said a letter was sent to Harkness confirming that it had been removed entirely from his credit report last week.

Source: thestar.com –  Staff Reporter, Published on Thu Oct 01 2015

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5 things your debt collector isn’t telling you

1. You don’t have to pay me. In most provinces, there’s a two- to six-year statute of limitations for collecting debts that comes into play after you make your last payment. If the statute has expired, you don’t technically have to pay a cent. Be careful though: Making a new payment or a written acknowledgement restarts the statute.

2. My deadlines are bogus. “Whenever a bill collector gives someone a deadline, 99% of the time they’ve just picked it out of the air,” says debt expert and author Mark Silverthorn. He’s simply trying to create a sense of urgency to intimidate you. Your response? Keep calm and don’t rise to the bait.

3. I can’t contact you more than three times a week. After an initial conversation with you, most provinces forbid debt collectors from contacting debtors more than this—and phone calls, emails, even voice mails all count. So if a collector is exceeding this, inform him he’s breaking the law. Just the fact that you’re aware should spook him.

4. Evening calls are off limits. In most provinces, collectors can’t call early in the morning or late at night. Take Ontario, where contact between 9 p.m. and 7 a.m. is forbidden. On Sunday, it’s limited to between 1 p.m. and 5 p.m. If you’re getting contacted outside lawful hours, be sure to keep records of the phone number and time of call, and file a complaint with a provincial regulator.

5. I probably won’t be suing you. Original creditors usually decide to sue within six months and typically won’t do it for amounts under $4,000. (Worth noting: They are more inclined to sue home owners). Third-party collection agencies, on the other hand, collect commissions on the amount of arrears they can get from you, and generally aren’t in the business of suing, says Silverthorn. In fact, they pursue legal action on fewer than 10% of their accounts. “As long as you’re getting the collection calls, then you are probably not going to be sued.”

Source: MoneySense.ca by   January 18th, 2016

If you are not too sure what your next step is when it comes to dealing with collection agencies; give us at the Ray McMillan Mortgage Team a call, and you will walk you through your options. www.RayMcMillan.com

 

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