Category Archives: home buyers

Ten ways the new mortgage rules will shake up the lending market

THE CANADIAN PRESS

 

Source: The Globe and Mail – SPECIAL TO THE GLOBE AND MAIL

T-minus 76 days and counting until Canada’s banking regulator launches its controversial mortgage stress test. It’ll be squarely aimed at people with heavier debt loads and at least 20 per cent equity – and it will be a tide turner.

Given where Canada’s home prices and debt levels are at, this is easily the most potent mortgage rule change of all time. Here are 10 ways it’s going to shake up Canada’s mortgage market for years to come:

1. It’s like a two-point rate hike: Uninsured borrowers can qualify for a mortgage today at five-year fixed rates as low as 2.97 per cent. In a few months that hurdle will soar to almost 5 per cent. If you’re affected by this, you could need upward of 20 per cent more income to get the same old bank mortgage that you could get today.

2. Quantifying the impact: An OSFI spokesperson refused to say how many borrowers might be affected, calling that data “supervisory information” that is “confidential.” But at least one in six uninsured borrowers could feel the blow based on the Bank of Canada estimates of “riskier borrowers” and predictions from industry economists like Will Dunning. Scores of borrowers will be forced to defer buying, pay higher rates, find a co-borrower and/or put more money down to qualify for a mortgage.

3. Why OSFI did it: Forcing people to prove they can afford much higher rates will substantially increase the quality of borrowers at Canada’s banks. OSFI argues that this will insulate our banking system from economic shocks, and to the extent it’s correct – that’s good news.

4. A leap in non-prime borrowing costs: Many home buyers with above-average debt, relative to income, will resort to much higher-cost lenders who allow more flexible debt ratio limits. At the very least, more will choose longer amortizations (i.e., 30 years instead of 25 years) and take longer to pay down their mortgage. Non-prime lenders will also become pickier. Why? Because they’ll see a flood of formerly “bankable” borrowers getting declined by the Big Six. That could force hundreds of thousands of borrowers into the arms of lenders with the highest rates. If you have a higher debt load, weak credit and/or less provable income, get ready to pay the piper.

5. A safer market or riskier market? The shift to expensive non-prime lenders could boost mortgage carrying costs and overburden many higher-risk borrowers, exacerbating debt and default risk in the non-prime space. “We’re very aware of the potential migration risk [from banks to less regulated lenders],” Banking superintendent Jeremy Rudin told BNN on Tuesday. “It’s not something that would be a positive development.” If rates keep rising, non-prime default rates could spike over time. Albeit, keep in mind, we’re talking a single-digit percentage of borrowers here. The question people will ask is: Does growing debt risk in the non-prime mortgage market, combined with home price risk and a potential drop in employment and consumer spending truly lower banks’ risk?

6. Provincially regulated lenders win: Unless provincial regulators follow OSFI’s lead (if history is a guide, they won’t), it’ll be a bonanza for some credit unions. Many credit unions will still let you get a mortgage based on your actual (contract) rate, instead of the much higher stress-test rate. That means you’ll qualify for a bigger loan – if you want one. We could also see a few non-prime lenders charge lower rates to help people qualify for bigger mortgages, while tacking on a fee to mortgage for that privilege.

7. Trapped renewers: Lenders are thrilled about one thing: customer retention. As many as one in six people renewing their mortgage could be trapped at their existing bank because they can’t pass the stress test at another lender. And if a bank knows you can’t leave, you can bet your boots they’ll use that as leverage to serve up subpar renewal rates.

8. A short-term spurt: Expect a rush of buying in the near term from people who fear they won’t qualify after Jan. 1. The question is, how much of that short-term demand will be offset by people selling, as a result of the rule change’s perceived negative impact. In the medium term – other things equal – this is bearish for Canadian home prices. Period. That said, borrowers will likely adapt within two to five years. And prices will ultimately resume higher.

9. The stress test could change…someday: While few credible sources expect OSFI’s announcement to trigger a housing crash, the higher rates go, the more this will slow housing. Financial markets expect another rate hike by January, with potentially two to four – or more – to come. Mr. Rudin says OSFI may “revisit” the restrictiveness of the stress test if rates surge, but will the regulator act in time to prevent diving home values? That’s the trillion-dollar question. The good news is that rates generally rise with a strengthening economy, which is bullish for housing – for at least a little while.

10. Questions abound: Tuesday’s news will undoubtedly spark contentious debate over whether this was all necessary, given already slowing home prices, provincial rule tightening, rising rates and the fact that uninsured default rates are considerably lower than for people with less than 20 per cent equity.

OSFI says its responsibility is to keep banks safe and sound. Overly concerning itself with the side effects of its mortgage stress test is not its mandate, it claims. Well, in a few years we might be either congratulating OSFI, or asking if that mandate needs to change.

THE CANADIAN PRESS

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What the new mortgage rules mean for homebuyers – There are two scenarios new buyers can anticipate

mortgage math

 

Source: MoneySense.ca – by  

 

 

Today, the Office of the Superintendent of Financial Institutions (OSFI) introduced new rules on mortgage lending to take effect next year.

OSFI is setting a new minimum qualifying rate, or “stress test,” for uninsured mortgages (mortgage consumers with down payments 20% or greater than their home price).

The rules now require the minimum qualifying rate for uninsured mortgages to be the greater of the five-year benchmark rate published by the Bank of Canada (presently 4.89%) or 200 basis points above the mortgage holder’s contractual mortgage rate. “The main effect will be felt by first-time buyers,” says James Laird, co-founder of Ratehub.ca. “No matter how much money they put down as a down payment, they will have to pass the stress test.” The effect of the changes will be huge, resulting in a 20% decrease in affordability, meaning a first-time homebuyer will be able to buy 20% less house, explains Laird.

MoneySense asked Ratehub.ca to run the numbers on two likely scenarios and find out what it would mean for a family’s bottom line. Here’s what they found:

SCENARIO 1: Bank of Canada five-year benchmark qualifying rate

In this case, the family’s mortgage rate, plus 200 basis points, is less than the Bank of Canada five-year benchmark of 4.89%.

According to Ratehub.ca’s mortgage affordability calculator, a family with an annual income of $100,000 with a 20% down payment at a five-year fixed mortgage rate of 2.83% amortized over 25 years can currently afford a home worth $726,939.

Under new rules, they need to qualify at 4.89%
They can now afford $570,970
A difference of $155,969 (less 21.45%)

SCENARIO 2: 200 basis points above contractual rate

In this case, the family’s mortgage rate, plus 200 basis points, is greater than the Bank of Canada five-year benchmark of 4.89%.

According to Ratehub.ca’s mortgage affordability calculator, a family with an annual income of $100,000 with a 20% down payment at a five-year fixed mortgage rate of 3.09% amortized over 25 years can currently afford a home worth $706,692.

Under new rules, they need to qualify at 5.09%
They can now afford $559,896
A difference of $146,796 (less 20.77%)

If a first-time homebuyer doesn’t pass the new stress test, they have three options, says Laird. “They can either put down more money on their down payment to pass the stress test, they can decide not to purchase the home, or they can add a co-signer onto the loan that has income as well,” says Laird. The stress test will be done at the time of refinancing as well, with one exception. “If on renewal you stay with your existing lender, then you don’t have to pass the stress test again,” says Laird. “However, if you change lenders at mortgage renewal time, you may have to pass the stress test but it’s not crystal clear now if this will be the case for those switching mortgage lenders.”

So if you’re a first-time homebuyer, it may mean renting a little longer and waiting for your income to go up before you’re able to buy your first home. Alternatively, some first-time buyers will buy less—maybe a condo instead of a pricier detached home. Or, the new buyers may opt to get a co-signer to qualify under the new rules.

But whatever you do, if you’re a first-time buyer, make sure you understand what you qualify for using the new regulatory rules, and get a pre-approved mortgage before you start house-hunting. “This shouldn’t be something that shocks you partway through the home-buying process,” says Laird.

And finally, do your own research and run the numbers on your own family’s income numbers. You can use Ratehub.ca’s free online mortgage affordability calculator to calculate the impact of the mortgage stress test on your home affordability.

mortgage math

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Still thinking of home ownership as an investment? Here’s proof you’re wrong

 

Source: The Globe and Mail

Take some advice from rookie home owner Desirae Odjick about houses as an investment.

As a personal finance blogger, she ran the numbers on the cost of owning a home and concluded that breaking even would be a good outcome when it comes time, many years down the road, to sell. “A house is not a long-term investment,” she said in an interview. “It’s not a miracle financial product. It’s where you live.”

The idea that owning a house is an investment is so ingrained that a recent survey found one-third of homeowners expect rising prices to provide for them in retirement. But rising prices do not necessarily mean houses are a great investment.

Ms. Odjick lives in a suburb of Ottawa, where the real estate market’s recent strength still leaves it way behind price gains seen in the Toronto and Vancouver areas. But her point is relevant to all markets where prices aren’t soaring, and probably to hot markets as well if you’re just now buying a first home and understand that continuous massive price gains are unlikely.

In terms of home upkeep costs, Ms. Odjick and her partner have had an easy time of it since they bought in the spring. But they’ve still had expenses that surprised them. “You can use all the calculators you want and you can plan as much as you want, but until you’re in it you really don’t know what the costs are going to be.”

One example is the $3,000 spent at IKEA to equip the house with furnishings as mundane as bathmats. Another was the cost of term life insurance, which, incidentally, is a smart purchase. Term life answers the question of how the mortgage gets paid if one partner in a home-owning couple dies.

Estimates of the cost of upkeep and maintenance on a home range between 1 and 3 per cent of the market value. Her house cost $425,000, which means that upkeep costs conservatively estimated at 1 per cent would come out to an average of $4,250 per year and a total $106,250 over 25 years. Ms. Odjick is too recent an owner to have much sense of these costs, but the housing inspector she used before buying warned her to expect to need a new roof in two or three years.

She and her partner don’t have grandiose plans to fix their place up right now, but she did mention that they are looking at having children. There will almost certainly be expenses associated with getting the baby’s room ready.

In her own analysis of housing costs, Ms. Odjick estimated the cost of property taxes at 1 per cent of a home’s value. That’s another $4,250 per year. This cost would add up to $106,250 over 25 years, and that’s without annual increases factored in.

The biggest cost homeowners face is mortgage payments. Ms. Odjick and her partner made a down payment of 10 per cent on their home and chose a two-year fixed-rate mortgage at 2.71 per cent. Assuming rates stay level and no prepayments are made, this would theoretically work out to a total of $542,122 in principal and interest over the 25-year amortization period.

But rates have crept higher since mid-summer and could increase further in the months ahead. In a post on home ownership on her Half Banked blog, Ms. Odjick said the idea of rates staying level “is bananas and will not happen.”

Let’s add up the costs of home ownership as likely to be experienced by Ms. Odjick over 25 years. There’s the $42,500 she and her partner put down to buy the house, the $106,250 cost for each of property taxes and upkeep/maintenance and $542,122 in mortgage principal and interest. Total: $797,122.

Now, let’s imagine the $425,000 house appreciates at 2.5 per cent annually for 25 years. That’s in line with reasonable expectations for inflation. The future price in this case would be $787,926, which means Ms. Odjick and her partner would have paid a bit more in costs than they get for selling their house in the end.

Houses can be sold tax-free if they’re a principal residence, so there is something to the house-as-an-investment argument. But the numbers comparing what you put in and what you take out over the long term don’t exactly scream “financial home run.”

Ms. Odjick’s fine with that, because buying her home was a lifestyle decision. “If we’ve lived here for 25 years, even if it does end up costing money, then it will have been a great place to live.”

Are you a Canadian family that has made a financial decision to remain lifelong renters? If you would like to share your story, please send us an email

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Should you buy in the city, suburbs or country?

Buying your first home brings major lifestyle changes – sometimes even a dramatic change in scenery. That’s because homeownership involves taking an honest look at your lifestyle, priorities and goals, and then investing hundreds of thousands of dollars in that vision. One of the first things to consider: should you buy where you rent, or house-hunt farther afield?

 

What’s right for you – the city, burbs or country?

CITY SLICKING

There’s a reason why urban real estate comes with a price premium: excellent public transit, plenty of arts and cultural attractions, lots of dining options, and easy access to everything from medical services to gyms and green space. Steady demand translates into a real estate investment that will grow as you build equity in your property.

PROS
  • Car-free living is a breeze (car share services are everywhere, so there’s no need to stress whenever you do require wheels)
  • Greater employment opportunities
  • Shorter commute to work and play
CONSIDERATIONS
  • Less home for the same price compared with suburbs and rural areas
  • Condos may be the only affordable option if you want to live right in the city core
  • Less privacy, thanks to closer quarters and higher population density

SUBURBAN DREAMS

Is it any wonder that generations of parents have flocked to the burbs to raise their families? It’s here that the much-desired single-family detached house rules, with big backyards (picket fence optional), good schools and a higher proportion of households with kids – perfect for impromptu street hockey or tag. While new communities may be low on shops and services, it only takes a few years of growth before cafés and sushi are just a short drive away!

PROS
  • Lower housing costs mean you get more home for your real estate dollar
  • Daycare costs are often lower than in the city
  • Quieter than the city, yet less remote than rural areas
CONSIDERATIONS
  • Longer commute and higher commuting costs (gas, parking, commuter trains and so on)
  • Some newer suburbs may not be as walkable compared with the city
  • Fewer entertainment, dining and grocery options nearby, aside from big-box chains

COUNTRY LIVING

Fresh, clean air, room to roam, no one to bug you about your bonfire or backyard hens – what could be better, right? Rural living has always appealed to self-reliant types, and in recent years it’s gotten a boost from millennials seeking a more affordable and lower-stress lifestyle (although overall, more people are leaving the country for the city). If you work from home, you can skip the commute and spend the extra time relaxing – or picking up a back-to-the-earth side gig to supplement your income.

PROS
  • Lower housing costs and more outdoor space for kids, pets and gardens
  • Easy access to recreational forests and lakes
  • Better air quality
CONSIDERATIONS
  • More susceptible to extreme weather: potential to be snowed in; power outages can be more frequent and last longer
  • Longer commutes to work, errands, entertainment and medical appointments
  • Harder to make friends in a small, tight-knit community (TIP: Make it easier by joining a volunteer committee!)

Source: homeownership.ca 

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A deeper look at millennial homebuyers

Get to know one of the largest cohorts of future home buyers – and what these clients want in a home.

“When looking for a home, 53% of peak millennial purchasers across Canada are willing to spend up to $350,000, which would typically buy them a 2.5 bedroom, 1.5 bathroom property nationwide, with 1,272 square feet of living space,” Royal LePage said in its latest report. “Yet, with 58% of respondents having a annual household income of less than $69,000, and only 34% currently tracking to have a sufficient down payment of over 20% to qualify for a mortgage in this price range, the actual logistics of homeownership can be quite difficult.”

The report, entitled Largest Cohort of Millennials Changing Canadian Real Estate, Despite Constraints of Affordability and Mortgage Regulation, was based on a cross-Canada survey about Millennials’ sentiments around real estate.

It found only 35% of millennials currently own a home, 50% rent, and 14% live with parents.

The desire to own a home is strong among these Canadians, with Royal LePage’s  survey finding 87% of Canadians aged 25-30 believe home ownerships is a good investment.

However, slightly fewer –69% — hope to own a home in the next five years and only 57% of those surveyed believe they will be able to afford one.

Of those interested in buying a home, 75% would use savings for a down payment; 37% would seek alternative funding as well and 25% plan to rely on family support.

When it comes to housing preference, 61% of respondents prefer to buy a detached home, while a mere 36% believe that is realistic, financially.

The majority (52%) would look to the suburbs when purchasing due to affordability constraints.

“When asked, 64% of peak millennials currently believe that homes in their area are unaffordable, with a significant proportion of respondents in both British Columbia (83%) and Ontario (72%) asserting that prices are simply too high,” Royal LePage said. “Of those that do not believe they will be able to own a home in the next five years, 69% stated that they cannot afford a home in their region or the type of home they want, while roughly a quarter (24%) are unable to qualify for a mortgage.”

Source: Canadian Real Estate Wealth – by Justin da Rosa

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Establishing your homebuying goals

establishing-your-homebuying-goals

The first step to purchasing your dream home, is determining what “dream home” means to you. Is it a spacious suburban house with a big yard? Or a sleek downtown condo just steps away from the city’s cultural attractions? Maybe it’s a country house where your family will have room to roam. Once you know what your homebuying goals are, you can plan how to get there. Here’s a three-step guide to getting started.

Step 1: Identify your homeownership goals

Not everyone has the same homeownership goals. What are yours?

Are you looking to buy a starter home? Will you resell it, in order to upgrade to a bigger family home? Or will you hold onto it as investment property?

Are you looking for a family home? Is it for your family alone, or will members of your extended family also be residing with you?

Is your plan to pay off your mortgage aggressively, or to take advantage of longer repayment terms? If you plan to pay your mortgage down fast, are you planning to host tenants in an income-generating unit within your property?

All these factors will influence your homebuying goals and homebuying criteria, so be sure you and your spouse are on the same page before you start house hunting.

Step 2: Create your new-home criteria

Think about your big-picture homeownership goals, as well as family lifestyle, when itemizing the criteria that will drive your homebuying goals.

Think about:

  • Bedrooms: Will your children share a room or each get their own?
  • The Kitchen: Do you need extra space for entertaining or for busy family meals? What about a breakfast nook where kids do homework while you cook?
  • The Bathrooms: How many baths and half-bathrooms do you need to handle morning rush hour?
  • Living/Dining: Do you have enough room? Would you prefer an open-concept space or separate rooms that can be closed off from one another?
  • Extra space: Is there room to expand into as your children grow? Could you finish the attic or basement?
  • Outdoor space: Does it suit your lifestyle? Can it be altered if this is not currently the case?
  • If you want an income-generating apartment within your home, does the space currently exist? Will it be easy to carve out, if not? What about zoning approval?
  • And of course, location, location, location: come up with search boundaries that work with your desired proximity to work, schools and local conveniences.
Step 3: Access the tools that can help you reach your home buying goals

Once you know what kind of home you’re searching for, use Genworth Canada’s online tools to crunch the numbers and make a plan for getting there.

Use the What Can I Afford calculator to determine how much of a mortgage you can carry. Use this info to fine-tune the geographic boundaries of your house search, or to reconsider some of your new-home criteria.

Keep on top of your homeownership and homebuying goals and plans by creating a profile with Genworth’s My Home Planner.

Finally learn about the Genworth Canada financial products available to you. Compare mortgage options to find the one that will turn your homebuying goals into your homeownership reality.

 

Sourece: Genworth.ca
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Ontario to place 15 per cent tax on foreign buyers to cool GTA housing market: Sources

Ontario to place 15 per cent tax on foreign buyers to cool GTA housing market: Sources

The Canadian Press has learned that the Ontario government will place a 15-per-cent tax on non-resident foreign buyers as part of a much-anticipated package of housing measures to be unveiled today.

The measures are aimed at cooling down a red-hot real estate market in the Greater Toronto Area, where the average price of detached houses rose to $1.21 million last month, up 33.4 per cent from a year ago.

Premier Kathleen Wynne and Finance Minister Charles Sousa have said the measures will target speculators, expedite more housing supply, tackle rental affordability and look at realtor practices.

Sousa says investing in real estate is not a bad thing, but he wants speculators to pay their fair share.

He says the measures will also look at how to expedite housing supply, and he has appeared receptive to Toronto Mayor John Tory’s call for a tax on vacant homes.

Sousa has also raised the issue of bidding wars, and has suggested realtor practices will be dealt with in the housing package.

The Liberals have also said that the government is developing a “substantive” rent control reform that could see rent increase caps applied to all residential buildings or units. Currently, they only apply to buildings constructed before November 1991.

Source: The Canadian Press – April 20, 2017

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