Category Archives: home inspections

Mike Holmes: How to control mould in your home, whether it’s visible or not

If mould in your home covers an area more than 10 sq. ft., or if there’s sewage involved, bring in a professional remediation company. Any surface with over 10 sq. ft. of mould should  be cleaned by licensed professionals.

Mould can present a serious health issue and it can also eat away at building materials, insulation and support structures. Unfortunately, homes and the materials inside them can provide the right food source and the right conditions for mould to grow. It’s important to know what to do if you detect mould in your home.

Mould needs an organic food source to grow, such as drywall, wood, paper, carpet, grout, wallpaper and fabrics — the kinds of materials you find in most homes. It also needs moisture and warmer temperatures.

Areas in the home where mould tends to grow include the basement, bathrooms, walls, ceiling corners, the attic, crawl spaces and on windowsills. If you live somewhere humid, the garage can also be place for mould to thrive. When you do your seasonal maintenance, make sure to check these areas for mould.

There are thousands of different types of mould. It can be green, black, yellow, white, even pink and, depending on the conditions, a single type of mould spore can be any number of colours.

It’s extremely difficult for homeowners to detect what type of mould is growing in their home and whether or not that type of mould poses a danger to their health.

A lot of people are sensitive to mould spores; they may trigger allergy and asthma symptoms when inhaled. Typically, the mould found in homes is not toxic, but it can still present a health risk. There’s no real standard for a mould level that is ‘OK’ or ‘safe’ — every individual reacts differently to mould.

According to a Mayo Clinic study conducted in 1999, 93 per cent of chronic sinusitis cases were attributed to mould. Children, the elderly and people with weakened immune systems may be more sensitive to the effects of mould exposure. If anyone in your home is experiencing headaches, sinus problems, sore throats or other respiratory symptoms, speak to your doctor. The cause could be mould.

If the mould in your home covers an area
more than 10 square feet, or if there’s sewage involved,
bring in a professional remediation company.

In most cases, you can tell if your house has mould by its musty smell and black stains. Other signs include water damage and black mould around baseboards, walls and ceilings. If there is a musty smell in your home but you can’t see any stains, mould could be behind your walls. In that case, I recommend having a certified professional home inspection done that includes thermal imaging, and possibly an indoor air quality assessment that includes mould testing.

If you find a small amount of mould that covers an area 10 square feet or less, you can typically remove it yourself. Use a solution of strong soap or detergent and water. I use a product that is non-toxic, anti-microbial, requires no scrubbing and kills mould at the root, not just the surface. Whatever you use, remember to wear the proper protective gear, such as goggles or safety eyewear, a mask and gloves, and keep the area well ventilated. And do not use bleach! Not only is bleach toxic, but the mould will come back anyway.

If the mould in your home covers an area more than 10 square feet, or if there’s sewage involved, bring in a professional remediation company.

If you bring in a professional, do your homework and ask the right questions. What are their credentials? What training have they gone through? What kind of professional accreditation do they have? Do they have references? Mould remediation is a fairly new industry, and like anything new, it’s the frontier. To make sure the job will be done right, find someone with Institute of Inspection Cleaning and Restoration Certification (IICRC).

The best way to get rid of mould is to control the moisture in the house and remove the mould. It could be something you can remove yourself, or you might have to bring in a professional. If you’re not sure, hire a professional, because when it comes to your health, it’s not worth the risk.

Source:  Mike Holmes, Special to National Post | May 28, 2016 | Watch Mike Holmes in his series, Holmes Makes It Right, on HGTV. For more information, visit makeitright.ca.

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Buying a Home in the Winter

Spring and summer are the high season for home sales, but winter can be a buyer’s market. If you don’t mind a smaller pool of homes for sale or moving around the holidays, winter might be a good time for you to house shop.

Less Competition, More Leverage
Since spring and summer are the most active real estate seasons, many home sellers wait until then to list their homes. That means there are fewer homes for sale in the winter, but the sellers often have strong reasons to sell their homes soon, such as job relocation. These motivated sellers can be a boon to the home buyer.

While there are fewer homes to choose among, the smaller selection can save you a lot of time. Do you really want to traipse through 50 houses? It may be simpler to view the handful of homes for sale in the winter and choose the one that best suits your needs.

Just as there are fewer homes for sale during the winter, there are fewer buyers, too. That means less competition and sellers who are more willing to accommodate potential buyers. Use this knowledge to your advantage. Offer a relatively low (but not insultingly low) bid for the home you’ve selected, or ask for perks such as the living room furniture or the chandelier that you admire.

The low number of potential buyers also means you have more time to make your decision. In the spring, you often need to choose a home and act quickly, but in winter you may be able to take your time.

Assessing a Home’s Winter Fitness
Viewing homes in the winter lets you see how it holds up to the weather. Did you feel cold while looking through the house? Is there a functioning heating system and hot water? Are the windows letting in drafts?

Availability of Agents and Others
Another advantage of buying a home in the off-season is the greater availability of industry professionals. Real estate agents will have fewer clients and more time to focus on your home search. Lenders will be more accessible for questions and assistance. Some lenders even waive fees during the off-season to encourage borrowers to use their services. Likewise, movers tend to lower their costs during the winter months.

Gray Gardens or Winter Wonderland?
Home buyers can be turned off by the bleak look of prospective homes in winter. Bare trees and lawns covered in gray snow aren’t the most picturesque. However, you’ll be able to see how well neighbors tend driveways and sidewalks, whether the town plows or salts icy streets, and whether kids come out to play in the snow. Around the holidays, you might even see the neighborhood decorated in its winter finest.

Source: Realtor.com By Dini Harris October 3, 2013

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Mike Holmes brings heightened integrity to home inspection business

Image supplied by Mike Holmes Inspections

When Canadian contractor Mike Holmes first appeared on his breakthrough TV series Holmes on Homes over 11 years ago, unscrupulous contractors everywhere started shaking in their steel-toe boots.

Holmes reminded skeptical homeowners what a building industry with integrity looked like, and it wasn’t long before he was determined to do the same for the home inspection industry.

“Working on Holmes on Homes, I was seeing a lot of problems that a home inspection should have caught — I’m talking major red flags,” says Holmes.
“When homeowners would tell me that they did get a home inspection [before buying], that really bothered me.”

Holmes didn’t like what he was seeing, especially when homebuyers tried to do their due diligence by getting a home inspection, then didn’t get the information they needed to make informed decisions about a prospective home.

“I’d look at a report and it wasn’t even worth the paper it was written on. And I was seeing this happen, over and over again. Couples would look at a house, get a home inspection, and then not even a year later — sometimes the same day they move in — the problems would start to show up. A leak here, mould there, dangerous electrical. These are not cheap fixes. Before you know it, the homeowners would practically go bankrupt just trying to make their home safe. That’s unacceptable.”

His plan was simple: ensure home inspections did what they were meant to do —protect the homeowner.

“I wanted a service that helped people make better choices for their health, their family and their future,” says Holmes. “You should be able to buy a home and have a pretty good idea of what it’s going to be worth five years down the road, 10 years. You should know if it has knob-and-tube wiring; if it’s losing heat; if the windows need to be upgraded or the roof replaced. To do that, you need good home inspectors: professionals who know what they’re doing and who know how to use the right tools. Because everything you see on the surface is the eye candy. What’s behind everything, that’s reality.”

So Holmes started a home inspection company, Mike Holmes Inspections, which brought heightened standards to the job.
inspector-crack

“Buying a home isn’t small potatoes,” he says. “It’s one of the biggest investments most people will ever make, and you’re leaving that up to chance? You need to know what you’re buying before you buy it. It’s like going to the grocery store and buying cans of food with no labels — you have no idea what you’re getting. And some people gamble their entire future that way. Not smart.”

Mike recruited top inspectors with the right credentials. This included everything from carrying liability insurance and having a background in home construction to being an accredited level 1 thermographer.

“It was important to me to set a standard that separated the professionals from the cowboys. You don’t want someone who was flipping burgers or balancing books last year to be checking out your house. You want a pro who understands how a home works, and who can spot the red flags; someone who knows how to use a thermal imaging camera and moisture meter to find the issues. That’s experience, plain and simple. You need someone who has experience — years of experience — working with homes.”

Once again, Holmes is changing the industry from the inside out, helping people who just want a home that is safe, healthy, and that lasts. And he’s doing it one home at a time thanks to a fleet of professionals across Canada —and soon in the United States — that share his determination to give homeowners what they deserve.

“This isn’t about saying that this guy’s good or this guy’s bad,” adds Holmes. “This is about doing what’s right.”

For more information, visit mikeholmesinspections.com.

This content was provided by Mike Holmes Inspections for commercial purposes. Postmedia had no involvement in the creation of this content.

Source: Special to National Post | August 1, 2015 | Last Updated: Aug 1 7:00 AM ET

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