Category Archives: mature neighbourhoods

Canada’s Top 25 Best Places to Live in 2018

25. Whitby, Ont.

Rank in 2017: 103
Population: 136,657
Estimated Unemployment Rate: 5.7%
Median Household Income: $101,792
Average Household Net Worth: $817,453
Property Tax: 11.1%
Total Days Above 20°C: 100
Crime Rate Per 100,000:* 3,251
Family Doctors Per 100,000:* 81
See more stats about Whitby, Ont. here.


24. New Tecumseth, Ont.

Rank in 2017: 170
Population: 36,745
Estimated Unemployment Rate: 5.7%
Median Household Income: $96,041
Average Household Net Worth: $755,965
Property Tax: 20.5%
Total Days Above 20°C: 122
Crime Rate Per 100,000:* 2,906
Family Doctors Per 100,000:* 95
See more stats about New Tecumseth, Ont. here.


23. Newmarket, Ont.

Rank in 2017: 56
Population: 90,908
Estimated Unemployment Rate: 5.7%
Median Household Income: $95,636
Average Household Net Worth: $947,429
Property Tax: 16.1%
Total Days Above 20°C: 107
Crime Rate Per 100,000:* 2,749
Family Doctors Per 100,000:* 95
See more stats about Newmarket, Ont. here.


22. Bonnyville No. 87, Alta.

Rank in 2017: 228
Population: 14,658
Estimated Unemployment Rate: 3.9%
Median Household Income: $103,652
Average Household Net Worth: $789,157
Property Tax: 94.0%
Total Days Above 20°C: 86
Crime Rate Per 100,000:* 4,899
Family Doctors Per 100,000:* 93
See more stats about Bonnyville No. 87, Alta. here.


21. The Nation, Ont.

Rank in 2017: 123
Population: 13,275
Estimated Unemployment Rate: 5.1%
Median Household Income: $88,088
Average Household Net Worth: $478,620
Property Tax: 54.9%
Total Days Above 20°C: 113
Crime Rate Per 100,000:* 2,186
Family Doctors Per 100,000:* 142
See more stats about The Nation, Ont. here.


20. Whistler, B.C.

Rank in 2017: 84
Population: 13,193
Estimated Unemployment Rate: 4.3%
Median Household Income: $86,423
Average Household Net Worth: $1,460,422
Property Tax: 98.6%
Total Days Above 20°C: 83
Crime Rate Per 100,000:* 14,137
Family Doctors Per 100,000:* 159
See more stats about Whistler, B.C. here.


19. St. Albert, Alta.

Rank in 2017: 7
Population: 70,874
Estimated Unemployment Rate: 6.8%
Median Household Income: $123,948
Average Household Net Worth: $900,192
Property Tax: 66.3%
Total Days Above 20°C: 84
Crime Rate Per 100,000:* 5,313
Family Doctors Per 100,000:* 129
See more stats about St. Albert, Alta. here.


18. King, Ont.

Rank in 2017: 68
Population: 26,697
Estimated Unemployment Rate: 5.7%
Median Household Income: $110,816
Average Household Net Worth: $2,655,435
Property Tax: 18.1%
Total Days Above 20°C: 114
Crime Rate Per 100,000:* 2,749
Family Doctors Per 100,000:* 95
See more stats about King, Ont. here.


17. Lévis, Que.

Rank in 2017: 9
Population: 147,403
Estimated Unemployment Rate: 3.4%
Median Household Income: $79,323
Average Household Net Worth: $387,146
Property Tax: 65.1%
Total Days Above 20°C: 94
Crime Rate Per 100,000:* 2,784
Family Doctors Per 100,000:* 106
See more stats about Lévis, Que. here.


16. Toronto, Ont.

Rank in 2017: 129
Population: 2,933,262
Estimated Unemployment Rate: 5.7%
Median Household Income: $55,945
Average Household Net Worth: $906,663
Property Tax: 66.0%
Total Days Above 20°C: 117
Crime Rate Per 100,000:* 3,847
Family Doctors Per 100,000:* 75
See more stats about Toronto, Ont. here.


15. Fort St. John, B.C.

Rank in 2017: 160
Population: 21,251
Estimated Unemployment Rate: 5.7%
Median Household Income: $106,327
Average Household Net Worth: $440,481
Property Tax: 99.5%
Total Days Above 20°C: 64
Crime Rate Per 100,000:* 14,000
Family Doctors Per 100,000:* 104
See more stats about Fort St. John, B.C. here.


14. Saugeen Shores, Ont.

Rank in 2017: 17
Population: 14,109
Estimated Unemployment Rate: 4.9%
Median Household Income: $105,210
Average Household Net Worth: $777,845
Property Tax: 14.2%
Total Days Above 20°C: 110
Crime Rate Per 100,000:* 5,113
Family Doctors Per 100,000:* 107
See more stats about Saugeen Shores, Ont. here.


13. Mont-Royal, Que.

Rank in 2017: 8
Population: 21,172
Estimated Unemployment Rate: 6.3%
Median Household Income: $145,853
Average Household Net Worth: $2,392,238
Property Tax: 1.4%
Total Days Above 20°C: 117
Crime Rate Per 100,000:* 4,594
Family Doctors Per 100,000:* 124
See more stats about Mont-Royal, Que. here.


12. Red Deer, Alta.

Rank in 2017: 330
Population: 107,564
Estimated Unemployment Rate: 4.9%
Median Household Income: $90,844
Average Household Net Worth: $628,900
Property Tax: 86.7%
Total Days Above 20°C: 83
Crime Rate Per 100,000:* 19,460
Family Doctors Per 100,000:* 99
See more stats about Red Deer, Alta. here.


11. Camrose, Alta.

Rank in 2017: 216
Population: 19,488
Estimated Unemployment Rate: 3.9%
Median Household Income: $61,873
Average Household Net Worth: $519,846
Property Tax: 74.9%
Total Days Above 20°C: 83
Crime Rate Per 100,000:* 9,520
Family Doctors Per 100,000:* 99
See more stats about Camrose, Alta. here.


10. Halton Hills, Ont.

Rank in 2017: 24
Population: 65,782
Estimated Unemployment Rate: 5.7%
Median Household Income: $108,410
Average Household Net Worth: $1,190,923
Property Tax: 24.3%
Total Days Above 20°C: 120
Crime Rate Per 100,000:* 2,133
Family Doctors Per 100,000:* 91
See more stats about Halton Hills, Ont. here.


9. Saint-Lambert, Que.

Rank in 2017: 55
Population: 22,432
Estimated Unemployment Rate: 4.9%
Median Household Income: $83,626
Average Household Net Worth: $881,272
Property Tax: 12.5%
Total Days Above 20°C: 118
Crime Rate Per 100,000:* 3,724
Family Doctors Per 100,000:* 96
See more stats about Saint-Lambert, Que. here.


8. Westmount, Que.

Rank in 2017: 52
Population: 21,083
Estimated Unemployment Rate: 7.5%
Median Household Income: $117,755
Average Household Net Worth: $3,953,205
Property Tax: 8.9%
Total Days Above 20°C: 117
Crime Rate Per 100,000:* 4,594
Family Doctors Per 100,000:* 124
See more stats about Westmount, Que. here.


7. Canmore, Alta.

Rank in 2017: 29
Population: 14,930
Estimated Unemployment Rate: 5.1%
Median Household Income: $75,848
Average Household Net Worth: $1,478,315
Property Tax: 99.0%
Total Days Above 20°C: 64
Crime Rate Per 100,000:* 7,482
Family Doctors Per 100,000:* 138
See more stats about Canmore, Alta. here.


6. Milton, Ont.

Rank in 2017: 151
Population: 120,556
Estimated Unemployment Rate: 5.7%
Median Household Income: $111,875
Average Household Net Worth: $1,129,276
Property Tax: 67.7%
Total Days Above 20°C: 120
Crime Rate Per 100,000:* 2,133
Family Doctors Per 100,000:* 91
See more stats about Milton, Ont. here.


5. Lacombe, Alta.

Rank in 2017: 299
Population: 13,906
Estimated Unemployment Rate: 4.9%
Median Household Income: $97,800
Average Household Net Worth: $754,291
Property Tax: 76.6%
Total Days Above 20°C: 81
Crime Rate Per 100,000:* 7,932
Family Doctors Per 100,000:* 99
See more stats about Lacombe, Alta. here.


4. Saint-Bruno-de-Montarville, Que.

Rank in 2017: 6
Population: 27,171
Estimated Unemployment Rate: 4.9%
Median Household Income: $96,757
Average Household Net Worth: $864,221
Property Tax: 18.8%
Total Days Above 20°C: 118
Crime Rate Per 100,000:* 3,724
Family Doctors Per 100,000:* 96
See more stats about Saint-Bruno-de-Montarville, Que. here.


3. Russell Township, Ont.

Rank in 2017: 21
Population: 17,155
Estimated Unemployment Rate: 5.1%
Median Household Income: $112,644
Average Household Net Worth: $509,564
Property Tax: 50.1%
Total Days Above 20°C: 78
Crime Rate Per 100,000:* 2,540
Family Doctors Per 100,000:* 142
See more stats about Russell Township, Ont. here.


2. Ottawa, Ont.

Rank in 2017: 1
Population: 999,183
Estimated Unemployment Rate: 5.1%
Median Household Income: $93,975
Average Household Net Worth: $695,242
Property Tax: 39.3%
Total Days Above 20°C: 117
Crime Rate Per 100,000:* 3,782
Family Doctors Per 100,000:* 142
See more stats about Ottawa, Ont. here.


1. Oakville, Ont.

Rank in 2017: 15
Population: 209,039
Estimated Unemployment Rate: 5.7%
Median Household Income: $112,207
Average Household Net Worth: $1,742,036
Property Tax: 21.4%
Total Days Above 20°C: 107
Crime Rate Per 100,000:* 2,133
Family Doctors Per 100,000:* 91
See more stats about Oakville, Ont. here.

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Tagged , , ,
custom built homes, elderly homeowners, female home buyers, mature neighbourhoods, new construction, new homes, Uncategorized

Four things people always forget to check when buying a new home

Buying a home is no easy task.

With so many open houses and so many choices, by the time you find a property that just has that right feeling, you’re usually tempted to grab for the pen and sign your life away. Take a minute though; because people often get so lost in the appeal of the home and property itself, they forget to consider the surrounding neighbourhood. And believe us, your new home can really lose its luster if its located say, a 30-minute drive away from the nearest grocery store or school. That’s why Canada AM hosts sat down with Real Estate Expert Sandra Rinomato, so that you can get the home you want, in the neighbourhood you want it in.

CONSIDER YOUR LIFESTYLE

Whether you have pets, or are extremely active or consider yourself a foodie–these factors can all influence the areas in which you might want to live. So take a second to think about all the things that are important to you, Rinomato says. Maybe you want a short commute, or want to be in close proximity to a dog park, or restaurants and shopping centres. This should be the first thing you do after figuring out your financing and having an idea of what you can afford.

WALK SCORE

If you don’t own a car or plan to rent the property out in the future, a solid walk score can go a long way (the higher, the better). A walk score is based on your ability to walk from the property in question to things like banks, transit, shopping centres and so forth. Rental tenants can be lured in by a high walk score, and it’s generally a plus to know that convenient services aren’t very far away.

SCHOOL DISTRICT

It’s really easy to move into a new home and then realize it’s nowhere near or a school, or the kind of school you wanted to enroll your children into. Fortunately, there are many resources available online that can show you what kinds of schools are in your area (Ontario’s is right here).

EMERGING NEIGHBOURHOODS

By the time you have everything sorted–the neighbourhood, the school, the walk score, etc.–you might realize there’s no property that checks all of your boxes. Don’t worry, that’s normal. But often, it means sacrifices have to be made and you may have to look outside of your ideal neighbourhood. If this happens, Rinomato has some advice for how to find emerging neighbourhoods, where costs are still low but will rapidly rise in the future. The best way to find these spots is to look at the periphery of areas that are already hot and popular. As the population grows in the core, development will spread to the fringes.

Source; theloop.ca – FEB 26

Tagged , ,
adult lifestyle communities, boomerang kids, city living, commuters, downtown living, downtown toronto, housing affordability, land development, mature neighbourhoods, millennial buyers, Uncategorized

How transportation impacts real estate prices

Being around public transportation wasn’t always a good choice when it came to real estate. After World War II, downtown living was frowned upon and people flocked towards the suburbs in order to find larger and greener land. As a result, real estate prices rose outside the city.

Fast forward to today and we’re seeing the opposite effect. People want to live in the downtown core and public transportation is at the forefront of political debate.

Billions of dollars are being spent on new subways and streetcars in cities like Toronto and Vancouver. Calgary and Ottawa are also beefing up its public transit service in response to a higher demand from residents.

In fact, every major city across Canada has plans to focus on public transportation. It’s a response to increased population demands, and on minimizing the cost of economic and environmental resources.


Increased housing prices are a result of higher demand. In terms of housing near public transportation, this demand has increased because people want the convenience of walking to a subway or streetcar. This is an advantage because there is no requirement to pay for parking.

The millennial generation (those under 30 years old) also prefers to live close to public transportation. This generation of the population has made a conscious decision to drive less and walk more, thus, making them more dependent on public transportation.

This is especially true in the rental market where many renters opt to live in housing that is walking distance to a subway or streetcar route.

Transit is vital for building communities. It’s an essential service that provides mobility, creates jobs and takes cars off the street. As a result, congestion is reduced, fostering economic growth in the economy.

In terms of real estate prices, property values that are located close to public transit increase at a higher rate and have been shown to be more resilient to economic downturns.

A study created by the National Association of Realtors (NAR) and the American Public Transportation Association (APTA) concluded that “property values with good access to public transit remained much closer to their pre-recession levels than properties without access, even within the same city.”

This can also be seen in the short-term rental market. Properties listed on AirBnB and VRBO yield a higher return when they are located close to public transportation and to the downtown core.

As cities across Canada become more developed, it will be more and more difficult to commute downtown via car. Thus, properties that are located closer to the downtown and have good access to public transportation will continue to see growth in real estate prices.

Michael Rix is a co-founder of TurnKii, a Toronto-based company providing an all-in-one tool and service to support everyday landlords/real estate investors.

Source: Canadian Real Estate Wealth 25 Nov 2015

Tagged , , , ,
baby boomers, first time buyers, home buyers, mature neighbourhoods, millennial buyers, new construction, new homes

Buying a new home: Resale vs. new build

(Decision between a resale home or new build home / Getty Images / Wicki58): (Getty Images/Wicki58)© Used with permission of / © Rogers Media Inc. 2015. (Getty Images/Wicki58)

Source: MoneySense – Romana King

In the market to buy a new home? Not sure if you should buy a new build or a resale home? The decision isn’t always simple or obvious. That’s because it’s more than a dollars-and-cents debate, it’s a choice between lifestyles. Some people love the clean lines of a modern space while others fall in love with architectural embellishments of older homes. To help you decides answer these six simple questions.

Resale homes:

–> More established neighbourhoods

–> Greater access to urban transit

–> Established infrastructure that gives you the ability to walk to neighbourhood stores, schools, community centres and places of worship

New build homes:

–> Offers a brand-new community complete with new roads

–> Usually found in inner suburbs and bedroom communities (commuter towns an hour or two away from a metro downtown). However, you can now find new-build homes in major urban centres where developers buy, tear down and build new (often called an infill)

–> Neighbourhood amenities often not well-developed. Typically dependent on driving to all shops, community centres and other points of interest

#2.  Are you particular about the purchase price?

Resale homes:

–> On a square-foot basis, resale homes are typically less expensive

–> Good thing about resale homes is that price is negotiable. This is great as long as there is no bidding war.

New-build homes:

–> Typically more expensive, per square foot

–> Typically the price set by the builder is non-negotiable. What you can negotiate is the cost of upgrades

(Other costs, such as repairs and maintenance, need to be considered / Getty Images / Amy Eckert): Other costs, such as repairs and maintenance, need to be considered (Getty Image/Amy Eckert)© Used with permission of / © Rogers Media Inc. 2015. Other costs, such as repairs and maintenance, need to be considered (Getty Image/Amy Eckert)

#3. Have you factored in other costs associated with your home purchase?

Resale homes:

–> Over the years you will consistently spent more on maintenance with a resale home. For a glimpse into the lifespan of integral home components you can read our Ultimate Home Maintenance Guide

–> If you do plan on renovating you will need to take into consideration not just the remodel costs, but additional costs to bring your home up to current building codes. For instance, if you plan on adding a second floor, you may be required to rewire all the existing electrical wiring in the home

–> If you want to remodel, but keep your home’s current character, you’ll need to take into consideration that matching and replicating older building materials can be quite hard and quite expensive

New-build homes:

–> While new-builds are built to current building code standards you will have to pay extra for anything over and above the basics. One new-build buyer was shocked to find out that their french doors from the living room to the dining room were not only extra, but the sashes—the wood dividers that break up the big piece of glass in the centre of each door—were another additional cost

–> You’ll need to pay GST/HST on the final sales price. On a $450,000 that’s another $58,500 (if you live in Ontario and have 13% HST. It could be less or more depending on the province you live in)

–>But you won’t need to budget quite as much for annual maintenance or upkeep because the home is new. If there are defects you can usually get this repaired under the home’s warranty (just be sure to check the warranty guidelines and time limits)

(Choosing between the modern lines of a new build and the character of a resale / Getty Images / Wolfgang Kaehler): Choosing between the modern lines of a new build and the character of a resale (Getty Images/Wolfgang Kaehler)© Used with permission of / © Rogers Media Inc. 2015. Choosing between the modern lines of a new build and the character of a resale (Getty Images/Wolfgang Kaehler)

#4. Do you love the character of old homes? Or the clean lines of a new home?

Resales homes:

–> Resale homes often come oozing charm and character. Whether its the tree-lined street or the unique facades that lend character to each house

–> Inside you can find architectural details, such as vaulted ceilings and built-in cabinetry, that lend a unique feeling to each home

New-build homes:

–> Usually offers open, updated living spaces with clean, modern designs

–> You’ll need to pay extra for architectural upgrades, such as high ceilings

–> If you buy and move-in to a new-build while the community is still being built you’ll need to get used to living in a construction zone

(Move-in dates are flexible with resale homes / Getty Images / Tom Merton): Move-in dates are flexible with resale homes (Getty Images/Tom Merton)© Used with permission of / © Rogers Media Inc. 2015. Move-in dates are flexible with resale homes (Getty Images/Tom Merton)

#5. Are you flexible about your move-in date?

Resale homes:

–> The advantage of a resale home is that every factor is part of the negotiation and this includes the possession, or move-in, date. For that reason, resale home purchases are often more convenient for people with specific move-in timelines

New-builld homes:

–> While builders will offer some flexibility it really boils down to whether or not the builder can meet their construction schedule. Don’t be surprised if you’re move-in date is delayed

(Consider what type of neighbours you want when buying a home / Getty Images / Yellow Dog Productions): Consider what type of neighbours you want when buying a home (Getty Images/Yellow Dog Productions)© Used with permission of / © Rogers Media Inc. 2015. Consider what type of neighbours you want when buying a home (Getty Images/Yellow Dog Productions)

#6. What type of neighbours do you want?

Resale homes:

–> Older neighbourhoods where resale homes are found often have a mixed bag of residents from young families, to renters to retirees

New-build homes:

–> Brand-new communities will often attract a more homogenous buyer group—and developers know, market and build accordingly. You’ll find the developer has a specific buyer in mind—whether it’s urban professionals, starter homes or single family homes—they’ll build for this clientele and, more than likely, these will be the neighbours you’ll end up beside