Category Archives: mortgage arrears

How divorces affect mortgages


How divorces affect mortgagesThey say about half of all marriages end in divorce—whatever the figure, complications arise when it comes to dividing assets like homes, and determining who keeps making mortgage payments.

“It’s a commercial transaction irrelevant to marital status,” said Nathalie Boutet of Boutet Family Law & Mediation. “If one person moves out and the other stays in the house, they still have an obligation to pay the mortgage to the bank, so the sooner the separating spouses make an arrangement the better because it could impact credit rating.”

According to Statistics Canada, there were roughly 2.64 million divorced people living in Canada last year—a figure brokers may not find surprising. While divorcing couples often fight over their marital home as an asset, the gamut of considerations is in fact more onerous.

“With the stress test, it’s a lot harder,” said Nick Kyprianou, president and CEO of RiverRock Mortgage Investment Corporation. “The challenge is qualifying again with a single salary. The stress test adds a whole other level of complexity to the servicing.”

Additional complexities include a new appraisal, application, and discharge fees.

“If you have a five-year mortgage and you’re only two years into it, there will be some penalties,” said Kyprianou. “Then there’s a situation of whether or not the person will qualify as a single person for a new mortgage.”

As an equity lender, RiverRock has welcomed into the fold its fair share of borrowers whose previous institutional lender wouldn’t allow one of the spouses to come off title because they were qualified together.

If one spouse is the mortgage holder and the other is not, Boutet explains how the law would mediate.

“Let’s say she owns the house and he moves in and pays her something she would put towards the mortgage but it’s still below market rent, she’s effectively giving him a break,” she said. “Would part of his rent go towards a little equity in the house because he helps pay the mortgage? Or is he ahead of the game because he pays less than he would to rent an apartment? What they have decided in this case is that a percentage of his payment will be given back to him as compensation for helping her out with her mortgage and he will never go on title.”

Boutet recommends that cohabitating couples, one of whom being a mortgage holder, should have frank discussions at the outset about where the rent payments go.

“Sometimes the person who pays rent has a false understanding of paying the mortgage. They have a misunderstanding of what that money is going towards.”

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Don’t-pay-til-you-die reverse mortgages are booming in Canada as seniors binge on debt

Don’t-pay-til-you-die reverse mortgages are booming in Canada as seniors binge on debt

Already carrying debt, many seniors can’t downsize because they can’t afford high rents, so turn to reverse mortgages for a new source of income

If you’re 55 or older, you can borrow as much as 55 per cent of the value of your home. Principal and compound interest don’t have to be paid back until you sell the home or die.Getty Images/iStockphoto

Reverse mortgages are surging in Canada as more older people join the country’s debt bandwagon.

If you’re 55 or older, you can borrow as much as 55 per cent of the value of your home. Principal and compound interest don’t have to be paid back until you sell the home or die. To keep the loan in good standing, homeowners only need to pay property tax and insurance, and maintain the home in good repair.

“We’ve only been in this market for 18 months, but applications are jumping,” and have tripled over the past year, Andrew Moor, chief executive officer at Equitable Group Inc., said in an interview. The company, which operates Equitable Bank, sees the reverse mortgage sector expanding by about 25 per cent a year. “Canadians are getting older and there is an opportunity there.”

Outstanding balances on reverse mortgages have more than doubled in less than four years to $3.12 billion (US$2.37 billion), excluding foreign currency amounts, according to June data from the country’s banking regulator. Although they represent less than one percentage point of the $1.2 trillion of residential mortgages issued by chartered banks, they’re growing at a much faster pace. Reverse mortgages rose 22 per cent in June from the same month a year earlier, versus 4.8 per cent for the total market.

The fact that these niche products are growing so quickly offers a glimpse into how some seniors are becoming part of Canada’s new debt reality. After a decades-long housing boom, the nation has the highest household debt load in the Group of Seven, one reason Bank of Canada Governor Stephen Poloz may be reluctant to join the global monetary-policy easing trend.

More seniors are entering retirement with debt and the cost of rent has shot up in many cities, making downsizing difficult amid hot real estate markets. Reverse mortgages offer a new source of income.

Canada’s big five banks have so far shied away from the product. Only two lenders offer them in Canada. HomeEquity Bank, whose reverse mortgage has been on the market for 30 years, dominates the space with $3.11 billion on its books. Equitable Bank, a relatively new player, has $10.1 million. Shares in parent Equitable Group have surged 75 per cent to a record this year.

Critics say reverse mortgages are a high-cost solution that should only be used as a last resort.

“When they think of their cash flow, they’re not going to get kicked out of their house, but in reality, it really has the ability to erode the asset of the borrower,” Shawn Stillman, a broker at Mortgage Outlet, said by phone from Toronto.

HIGHER RATES

Interest rates are typically much higher than those for conventional mortgages. For example, HomeEquity Bank and Equitable Bank charge 5.74 per cent for a five-year fixed mortgage. Conventional five-year fixed mortgages are currently being offered online for as low as 2.4 per cent.

Atul Chandra, chief financial officer at HomeEquity Bank, said the higher rates are justified because the lender doesn’t receive any payments over the course of the loan.

“Our time horizon for getting the cash is much longer, and generally the longer you wait for your cash to come back to you, the more you need to charge,” Chandra said in a telephone interview.

MOST DELINQUENT

Executives at HomeEquity Bank and Equitable say they are focusing on educating people about reverse mortgages to avoid mistakes that were made in the U.S. during the housing crisis — including aggressive sales tactics.

While delinquency rates on regular mortgages are still low for seniors, they were the highest among all age groups in the first quarter, at 0.36 per cent, according to data from the federal housing agency. The 65-plus demographic took over as the most delinquent group at the end of 2015. For non-mortgage debt, delinquency rates in the 65-plus category have seen the biggest increases over the past several quarters, Equifax data show.

Reverse mortgages aren’t included in typical delinquency rate measures — borrowers can’t be late on payments because there are no payments — but they can be in default if they fail to pay taxes or insurance, or let the home fall into disrepair. However default rates for reverse mortgages have remained stable, even with the strong growth in volumes, said HomeEquity’s Chandra.

According to a scenario provided by HomeEquity Bank, a borrower who took out a reverse mortgage of $150,000 at an interest rate of 5.74 per cent would owe $199,058 five years later. A home worth $750,000 when the reverse mortgage was taken out would be worth $869,456 five years later, assuming 3 per cent annual home price appreciation, meaning total equity would have grown by about $70,000.

Source: Financial Post – Bloomberg News 

Chris Fournier and Paula Sambo 

September 16, 2019

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How rising interest rates are squeezing homeowners

Mortgage holders on tenterhooks as they prepare for Bank of Canada’s next rate announcement Oct. 25

Gerry Corcoran is bracing for Oct. 25. That’s when the Bank of Canada will make its next interest rate announcement, on the heels of two consecutive rate hikes. Corcoran said he can’t afford a third.

“A lot of us with variable rate mortgages are on pins and needles because we’re like, ‘Are we going to get hit again?'”

‘It’s kind of smacked my finances around a little bit.’– Gerry Corcoran, new homeowner

Corcoran, 38, signed the mortgage for his two-bedroom condo in Stittsville back in June.

Two weeks later, on July 12, the Bank of Canada announced a rate increase of .25 per cent, the first increase in seven years. It was followed by a second .25 per cent increase in September.

As someone with a variable rate mortgage, Corcoran says those small rate hikes have had a sizeable impact. He estimates they’ll cost him about $65 per month.

While it’s a cost he says he can absorb, as a new homeowner Corcoran only has a few hundred dollars a month in disposable income. It’s also meant he’s had to put on hold his plan to enrol in his employer’s matching RRSP program until next year.

“It’s kind of smacked my finances around a little bit,” he said. “It hurts.”


 


Gerry

‘A lot of us with variable rate mortgages are on pins and needles because we’re like, ‘Are we going to get hit again?” (Ashley Burke/CBC News)

Homeowners in ‘panic mode’

After years of record-low interest rates, people in the mortgage business say they’ve been waiting for this other shoe to drop.

Erin MacDonell, a mortgage agent with Mortgage Brokers Ottawa, says she saw a spike in calls after the rate hikes. Many callers were eager to buy — or refinance their mortgages — before rates went up again.

“People are in a little bit of a panic mode,” MacDonell said.

But even if interest rates continue to climb, she says a new federal “stress test” will help mortgage holders weather the changes.

Erin MacDonell, mortgage agent, ottawa mortgage brokers

Mortgage agent Erin MacDonell says calls from both potential buyers and homeowners looking to refinance spiked when the Bank of Canada announced a rate increase in July. (Ashley Burke/CBC Ottawa)

Under the safeguard introduced last October, a borrower had to be approved against a rate of 4.64 per cent for a five-year loan — even though many lenders are offering much lower rates. That rate is now 4.84 per cent.

The test applies to all insured mortgages where buyers have down payments that are less than 20 per cent of the purchase price.

“No one should be struggling too, too much,” MacDonell said.

Instead, she predicts future rate hikes will simply mean “people won’t be qualifying for as big of a house as they maybe wanted in the past.”

Gerry Corcoran says despite being forced to tighten his belt, buying was still the right choice for him.

“At the end of the day, even with mortgage and condos fees, I am still paying less to own this place than [I’d pay] to someone else to rent it.”

Source: Karla Hilton · CBC

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Things You Should Know About Mortgages

Things You Should Know About Mortgages

House hunting can be both exciting and stressful and it’s one of the biggest purchases most people make in their lives. When it comes to financing your home or business, Northwood Mortgage can answer all your mortgage questions, taking the edge off an exasperating experience.

What does a mortgage broker do?

A mortgage broker secures financing for you. He or she can steer you in the right direction and provide guidance on what would be most beneficial to your personal situation. A broker knows the marketplace and is constantly in touch with banks and other lenders to get you the best mortgage possible. Mortgage agents work for mortgage brokers who hold licences.

Who pays them?

The bank or lender is responsible for paying the broker’s commission. That amount depends upon how much you’ve borrowed.

Fixed mortgage

You’ll be paying the same amount in principal and interest for the term of your mortgage no matter what interest rates do. Many homebuyers prefer this type of mortgage because they know what to expect even though there’s a chance interest rates may drop. It’s a tradeoff for stability.

Variable mortgage

Keep an eye on the prime rate because with a variable mortgage you’ll be paying according to what interest rates do. There is a chance you may have to pay more if the rate increases, but on the other hand, you’ll shell out less if rates drop.

Open versus closed rates

An open rate can be variable or fixed. It’s generally more flexible and has a higher rate of interest than a closed mortgage. You can pay it off or make more payments with any penalty. A closed rate can also be variable or fixed. Most folks opt for closed rate mortgages since the rates are lower, but you can only pay on the principal as stated. Paying it out early will net you penalties.

What about the Canadian Mortgage and Housing Corporation (CMHC)?

This government corporation gives residential homebuyers default loan insurance, providing assistance to those who find it financially cumbersome when it comes to buying a house. This insurance will cost you anywhere from 1.75 to 2.95 per cent of the entire amount of your mortgage. It gives banks and lenders protection in case you can’t pay your mortgage. You must be a Canadian citizen to take advantage of what CMHC offers.

Northwood Mortgage is one of the largest mortgage brokerage firms in the Greater Toronto Area and we know the ins and outs of the lending world and will be able to answer any queries you have. Not only do we arrange mortgages for homebuyers, but we also work with investors and those in the industrial and commercial sectors to arrange loans in the millions of dollars.

With all there is to know about mortgages and all the terms that come with that information, your best course of action is to call Northwood Mortgage. One of more than 200 experts available will tell you about their exemplary services.

Source: http://www.NorthwoodMortgage.com

 

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CBC FORUM House keys sent to the bank? Your thoughts on mortgage defaults

The federal government is worried about Albertans making strategic defaults on their mortgages.

 

Some Albertans are walking away from their mortgages by putting their keys in the mail and sending them back to the bank.

It’s a phenomenon known as jingle mail — sparked by a combination of high debt and lost jobs — and was a big problem in Alberta back in the 1980s.

As a result, the federal government is watching the Alberta market closely. Jingle mail, or strategic defaults, weaken the housing market and increase loan losses among Canada’s banks, say experts.

We asked what this means to you: Does your mortgage keep you awake at night? What would make you send your house keys to the bank? Any personal mortgage anecdotes you want to share?

You weighed in via CBC Forum, our new experiment to encourage a different kind of discussion on our website. Here are some of the best comments made during the discussion.

Please note that user names are not necessarily the names of commenters. Some comments have been altered to correct spelling and to conform to CBC style. Click on the user name to see the comment in the blog format.

Many chimed in with their own mortgage advice.

  • “Sending house keys back to the bank seems very irresponsible. The banks are not going to absorb the costs — customers will be on the hook in the end.” — EOttawa​
  • “People who buy the McMansions in the hopes that someday they will become part of the upper class are the ones who should worry. Big risks have serious consequences. Good luck with it.” —Chris K
  • “No, it doesn’t keep me awake for the simple reason that we bought a home well within our means with a mortgage way lower than what the banks said we could borrow … It’s a question of common sense and priorities.” — docp

There was some discussion on who should be blamed.

  • “Lots of blame and finger pointing to go round. Bottom line, as many others have said, it falls on personal responsibility to make good decisions and sometimes circumstances outside our control force us to make tough decisions to survive — like using ‘jingle mail’ in Alberta.” — Don Watson

Several commenters even had their own jingle mail stories.

  • “My ex-husband and I returned the keys to the bank when it became clear that he was unable to maintain the mortgage payments on the home he had bought before we were married. This happened in the first year of marriage and it was a terrible blow to him. Later he declared bankruptcy.” — LinneaEldred
  • “We purchased our home within our means and have been able to keep up with the payments. We lived in Fort McMurray for four years, after they went through the downturn of the economy in the early 80s. Folks were turning in their keys then and walking away. People still don’t learn from past mistakes.” — Leslie Riley​

There were even some thoughts on the future … or lack of it.

  • “I have a mortgage and I also have a full-time job, yet I still worry about the future of my mortgage. I don’t believe that we need to point out the fact that even if you were or are smart about your money, you cannot predict your future.” — Samantha R.

You can read the full CBC Forum live blog discussion on mortgages below.

Can’t see the forum? Click here

Source: By Haydn Watters, CBC News Posted: Feb 09, 2016 12:26 PM ET

 

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…mortgages made simple…

Slide3

THE RAY C. MCMILLAN ADVANTAGE

The Ray McMillan Mortgage Team  is licensed through Northwood Mortgage Ltd. We deal with major banks, trust, life insurance, finance companies and private lenders. We are licensed to provide the most competitive mortgage rates and terms available for your real estate financing needs throughout Ontario.

OUR SERVICE INCLUDES:

 

  • First and second mortgages
  • Transfers
  • Condominium/Townhouse purchases
  • Home Improvement Loans
  • Construction Loans
  • Debt Consolidation
  • Refinancing
  • Power of Sale
  • Multi-residential
  • Vacant land
  • Cottages and recreational properties
  • Rural and farm properties

 

 

ARE THERE ANY COSTS INVOLVED?

When we arrange a prime residential first mortgage the lender pays us a finder’s fee.This does not affect the rate our terms of the mortgage in any way.

When we arrange any other type of mortgage that does not qualify as a prime residential mortgage then the lender does not pay us. We must then charge a brokerage fee*. The fee is based on the complexity involved to arrange the mortgage.

any-questions

You have mortgage questions, the Ray McMillan Mortgage Team has answers.

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O’Leary: Real estate makes for a poor asset given current market conditions

In an interview hosted by Business New Network, O’Leary Financial Group Chairman Kevin O’Leary shared his take on the current housing market; he revealed that he does not see the 30 to 50% correction that other industry experts are anticipating, but still considers real estate a very poor investment for this cycle.

“You’d be an idiot to buy a house,” O’Leary said during the interview.

He reasoned that investing in real estate is a bad decision, stating that he does not think that homes would considerably appreciate in value within five years. He also noted that buyers still have to pay real estate taxes and transfer taxes on the land, as well as pay their brokers 3 to 5%. All these closing transaction costs make real estate one of the more expensive asset classes to trade.

O’Leary surmised that it would cost investors between 8 to 12% to trade real estate assets. He also added that given the way things are, the chance an investor would enjoy a 12% appreciation over five years on a property is next to zero.

For close to 18 years, Canada has experienced a housing bull market, with perpetually low rates encouraging both homebuyers and speculators to snap up properties with almost zero capital. O’Leary expects that at the very best conditions will plateau soon, slightly improving chances of material appreciation on houses.

He goes on to mention the potential housing bubbles other pundits have observed in areas such as Vancouver, Montreal, Ottawa, and Toronto, where “shoebox condos” have begun sprouting to accommodate the large number of immigrants and/or millennials looking to move into the cities. With too many buyers and speculators participating in these popular markets, only time will tell when the bubbles will eventually burst.

O’Leary suggested that investors look into short duration, investment-grade corporate debt, as he sees it as an even more attractive and safer option than real estate. He also suggested to prospective homebuyers to look into renting instead, so that they can invest their cash into other things.

Source: MortgageBrokerNews.ca  04 Dec 2015 

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