Category Archives: mortgage default

Proposed mortgage rules aim to reduce financial risk in Canada’s hot housing markets

Vancouver has one of the hottest housing markets in Canada. New mortgage rules proposed by OSFI aim to mitigate the financial risks.

New rules proposed by the federal government to curb financial risks associated with the country’s hot housing markets could make it more difficult to secure a mortgage.

The Office of the Superintendent of Financial Institutions’ new guidelines proposed Thursday include stress tests for uninsured mortgages — loans secured with a deposit of at least 20 per cent on the value of the home.

Those homebuyers will now have to show that they can withstand a two per cent increase on their contractual mortgage rate. This would apply to variable and fixed-rate mortgages, regardless of term.

Using a million-dollar home as an example, buyers looking to secure a mortgage with a 20 per cent down payment at a three per cent interest rate would have to prove they could pay up to $4,652 per month instead of the $3,786 on their contract — a difference of $866 per month.

The changes come as the Bank of Canada looks set to increase interest rates as soon as next week for the first time in seven years.

CANADA-HOUSING/

The B.C. and Ontario governments have been using different tactics to try to cool housing prices in major cities. (Mike Cassese/Reuters)

“Persistently low interest rates, record levels of household indebtedness, and rapid increases in house prices in certain areas of Canada (such as Greater Vancouver and Toronto), could generate significant loan losses if economic conditions deteriorate,” OSFI wrote in a public letter.

But those working in and studying the real estate market say those changes aren’t likely to make a difference, especially given that those uninsured mortgages tend to be less risky because owners have already proved they have access to capital for a down payment.

What experts say will have a greater effect on housing markets is the office’s proposal to ban co-lending arrangements, or bundled mortgages, that sidestep rules designed to clamp down on risky lending.

The regulator said it is considering “expressly prohibiting co-lending arrangements that are designed, or appear to be designed, to circumvent regulatory requirements.”

Fear of a housing bust

Reuters reported in January that regulated mortgage providers were teaming up with unregulated rivals to circumvent rules limiting how much mortgage providers can lend against a property.

The arrangements have proliferated as Canadian regulators tightened lending standards to shield borrowers in case a decade-long housing boom goes bust.

“Bundled” or co-lending agreements with an unregulated entity can enable lenders to offer combined mortgages worth up to 90 per cent of a property’s value. Under federal rules, regulated lenders in Canada are not allowed to lend more than 65 per cent of the value of a home to borrowers with bad or nonexistent credit records.

They also cannot lend more than 80 per cent of a property’s value — even to borrowers with solid credit — without obtaining government-backed insurance.

city of vancouver empty homes

B.C. recently implemented a tax on foreign homebuyers as part of an attempt to reduce real estate demand and prices. (Rafferty Baker/CBC)

Under rules rolled out last October, that insurance requires the banks to run income stress tests on borrowers.

“When you’re looking at excited housing markets, you’re really concerned about where the capital is coming from,” said Tsur Somerville, a senior fellow with UBC’s Centre for Urban Economics and Real Estate.

“In terms of trying to cut down on the flow of capital in the housing, in particular in Toronto and Vancouver, cutting down on the bundling is probably the most important piece.”

Somerville guessed the intention behind the new regulations is likely a mix of wanting to cool those hot housing markets and mitigate risk in the financial sector.

Mortgage brokers concerned

Grant Thomas, founder and partner with The Mortgage Group, said he was concerned about the proposed changes — especially in big-city markets where homes often sell for millions of dollars.

Thomas said bundled mortgages are probably less than a third of all mortgages, but are often used when homeowners are financing the construction of a new home or are in between selling and buying a home.

Mortgage delinquency rates in Canada remain low even in cities like Toronto and Vancouver, he points out.

“The government has been intrusive in our industry in the last three years, and they continue to be so at a rate that is probably unnecessary,” he said.

“I’m not overjoyed whenever the government involves itself in business.”

Affordable housing in Nova Scotia.

Canadian regulators have tightened lending standards to shield borrowers in case a decade-long housing boom goes bust. (Robson Fletcher/CBC)

Thomas said his company and Mortgage Professionals Canada are planning to spend the next few days examining the proposed changes.

The Office of the Superintendent of Financial Institutions is accepting comments until Aug. 17. It said it will finalize the guidelines and set an effective date for implementation later in 2017.

The office said the proposed changes would be guidelines that federally regulated financial institutions would be expected to follow.

 

Source: Maryse Zeidler, CBC News

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How to read your mortgage documents

(Freeimages.com / Evan Earwicker)

A snapshot of typical mortgage documents and a few tips on what to watch out for

Thomas Bruner was a well-informed and financially savvy shopper. Thank goodness. Because his bank made errors in his mortgage documents. Big errors.

It was late 2015 and Bruner and his wife, Leslie, were in the process of selling their North York town-home to move into a larger upper beaches family home in the east end of Toronto. (We’ve changed names to protect privacy.) As a number-cruncher, Bruner knew how important it was to shop around for the best mortgage rate and was delighted to secure a five-year fixed rate of 2.49% with his current bank. To get that rate, he’d shopped around and negotiated hard with the bank representative at his local branch. But when the purchase of the home was closer to being finalized, Bruner was transferred to a bank mortgage specialist. That’s when the problems started.

A meticulous man, Bruner read every word of the 30-page mortgage document—some of it in small, fine print, and other sections bogged down with legal jargon. An hour later, Bruner emerged stunned. His bank had made a mistake. A big mistake. A mistake that added $100s to his monthly payments and tens of thousands in interest over the life of the mortgage.

Instead of 2.49%, they’d calculated his mortgage payments based on a rate of 2.99%. The bank had also changed the rate of payments from biweekly to monthly. If he’d signed the mortgage documents without reading the package, he would’ve paid more than $4,075 in extra interest payment,over the five year term*. That’s no small change. (*Assumes a $450,000 mortgage amortized over 25 years, interest calculated based on a five-year term.)

So, Bruner called the bank’s mortgage specialist. Rather than apologize and amend the error, the mortgage rep tried to argue that this was now the going mortgage rate—the best the bank could offer. Bruner was stunned, yet again. “I argued back,” he recalls, “explaining that we had locked in our rate during the pre-approval process. We were only 40-or-so days into the 90-day rate-hold guarantee.”

Screwed by the bank?

Bruner isn’t the only one to notice problems. According to the Ombudsman for Banking Services and Investments (OBSI), errors made by the banks rank No. 4 in the top 10 reasons for customer complaints. However, when asked for specific statistics on the precise number of complaints lodged, and how many of these complaints directly relate to errors in mortgage documents, an OBSI spokesperson replied that they don’t release this information. Instead, the OBSI offers very pretty spiderweb and sunburst visual representations of customer complaints.

This lack of transparency prompts the question: How many other people have been screwed by a professional working in the real estate market? (Cue the wrath of every bank, mortgage broker, home inspector, insurance agent, realtor and renovator involved in this industry.)

Still, how many of us signed a document only to realize, after the fact, that there was an extra charge? Or found an error that’s in the lender’s favour? While reading every page of every legal document we sign is the smart, prudent thing to do, truth be told very few of us understand all of what’s written in an insurance contract, mortgage document or even a purchase and sale agreement.

To help, here’s a snapshot of typical mortgage documents and a few tips on what to watch out for—keep in mind every lender have their own versions of this document, so this is meant to be illustrative only.

 

To help you process the information, consider the following.

Look for key rates and terms

mortgage documents

The pink arrow points to the mortgage interest rate that you will be charged during the duration of the loan term. Check this. Even a 10 basis point change in the rate can add up over the long haul.

The green arrow points to the length of your amortization, expressed by the number of months. Check this. Some of the biggest mortgage document errors are in how long a loan is amortized for; while a cheaper monthly rate can seem appealing, this sort of error can tack on tens of thousands of extra interest costs over time. Above this amortization rate, is your term length—how long you’re committed to pay this lender, based on the rates and terms you’ve both agreed upon. The line should also state whether you’ve agreed to a fixed, variable or open mortgage. . The type of mortgage you agree to can have serious implications on the penalties you’re charged should you opt to make an extra payment, or break your mortgage agreement. For simplicity sake, a one year mortgage is expressed as 12 months, while a five-year mortgage term is expressed as 60 months and a 25 years amortization is expressed as 300 months.

 

The three numbers in the red box reflect the monthly mortgage rate you will pay (a mixture of principal plus interest), the monthly property tax you will pay to your bank (who will then make a payment on your behalf) and the total amount you will pay based on the addition of these two amounts. If you want to double-check your lender’s math, try Dr. Karl’s Mortgage calculator.

The orange arrow is how frequently you will make payments to your lender. Check this. Not only does payment frequency help reduce the overall interest you end up paying, but to make changes after you’ve signed your document can cost you an out-of-pocket fee.

The yellow arrow is the day you first get your money and the day the interest clock starts ticking. Pay attention to this. Some lenders will charge you a larger amount for the first payment of your mortgage to cover the interest that has accrued from the Advance Date to the day you make a payment against the outstanding loan. Some lenders don’t increase the first payment, but allocate a larger portion of this payment to pay off the outstanding interest. Either way, you want to be clear about what’s being charged, and when.

Don’t forget property taxes

Mortgage documents

Under the property taxes clause you will notice that the monthly sum added to your mortgage payment is an “estimate” based on the lender’s assessment of your annual property taxes. If you don’t want to pay your property tax monthly or you want to amend how much you pay you’ll need to negotiate this with your lender.

Loan prepayment privileges can make or break a penalty

mortgage documents

In recent years, we’ve heard a lot about mortgage penalty fees. You pay these penalties to your lender whenever you break the negotiated terms of your loan contract. If you have an open mortgage, there should be no penalties for pre-payments or to pay-off the entire loan before the end of the negotiated term. If you have a variable-rate mortgage, you will be charged a penalty that’s equivalent to three months of mortgage payments, plus administrative fees. If you have a fixed-rate mortgage, you will be charged a fee that’s calculated using the Interest Rate Differential calculation. This calculation is different for every lender, but it can add up, quickly.

 

Planning a reno? Read the fine print

mortgage documents

Many homebuyers are shocked to learn that they can void their home insurance policy if they undertake home modifications or renovations without first notifying the insurance company and, typically, paying an additional premium. But did you know you can also void your mortgage loan contract—and prompt a lender to recall and cancel the loan—if you obtain a mortgage and don’t disclose intended construction, alterations or renovations to the home? Read your mortgage contract carefully to see exactly what must be disclosed.

Be prepared with documentation

mortgage documents

When reading your mortgage contract the lender will typically list the type of documents you are required to submit in order to verify the information you have provided. This will include pay-stubs, Notice of Assessments for your income tax, as well as additional loan or income verification. But don’t be surprised if your lender follows up with requests for additional documentation. Typically, they cover this off with a broad statement that notifies you that any information they request must be provided. A sample of this type of statement is above, in the red square highlight.

 

Check the accuracy of the payment frequency

mortgage documents

Do you have a plan to pay off your mortgage quickly? Part of that plan may include how often you pay your mortgage—the more frequent the payments, the more you pay and that means paying off the principal faster, which reduces the overall interest you pay for the loan. Every mortgage document will have an area where you can choose the frequency of payments. Be sure to check off your selection, as making change after the document is signed will cost you, as you can see below (in the red circle).

mortgage documents

Administrative fees to open and close a mortgage loan can add up. Ask for an amortization schedule—to verify how much of each payment is going towards the principal and how much is interest—and you’ll need to pay your lender. Want a mortgage statement? Fork out more money. Need to renew, you may be slapped with an additional fee. But the one that can be annoying, even if it is relatively minor, is the “Payment Change Fee” (highlighted in red). If there’s an error in your payment frequency in mortgage document you signed and you phone to make a correction, this lender will slap you with a $50 fee. Not your error, but it is your penalty. To avoid paying unnecessary fees, make sure to check your mortgage documents for inaccuracies.

 

Make sure you have insurance

mortgage documents

Did you buy a home but forget to shop for a home insurance policy? If your mortgage advance date arrives and you still haven’t been able to submit valid home insurance to your lender, expect a fee. For example, this lender charges $200 per month until you can provide evidence of a valid insurance policy for the home.

Other fees are deducted from the loan amount

mortgage documents

Did your lender ask for an appraisal on the home you want to buy? Don’t be surprised if you have to pay for that report (see highlights above). Plus, some lenders who require title insurance will deduct it from the total amount loaned to you; it’s only a few hundred dollars, but it can leave you scratching your head as to why you didn’t get your full mortgage-loan amount.

 

Where to go to complain

mortgage documents

Have questions or concerns about your mortgage documents? In your contract you should see a clause that clearly states how to get in touch with your lender or how to lodge a complaint. If this doesn’t work, and you’ve worked with a mortgage broker, contact the broker directly. They should work on your behalf to sort out any discrepancies with the lender. Finally, if your independent broker isn’t helpful or if you went through a bank to get a loan and you’re not getting anywhere, consider contacting the bank’s ombudsman. This is an independent role within a financial institution that’s tasked with addressing consumer complaints. If this fails, consider lodging a complaint with OBSI. But be warned: It can take up to nine months just to get an answer on a complaint, sometimes longer.

Scan the mortgage snapshot

mortgage documents

Finally, almost all lenders now provide a synopsis of all fees and terms in that back of your loan document. This doesn’t mean you should skip over the body of the document, but this summary is a great spot to start verifying if key terms, such as the mortgage rate and the length of amortization, is accurate. If not, mark it, and go back to your lender. Don’t be afraid to fight for what you agreed to. Bruner wasn’t.

Despite the reluctance by his bank’s mortgage specialist, Bruner eventually got the rate he was initially promised. One key component to his negotiations were the emails he’d kept. The correspondence was evidence of what Bruner was promised and made it hard for the bank to rescind the initial offer.

Source: Money Sense – by   October 31st, 2016

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Things You Should Know About Mortgages

Things You Should Know About Mortgages

House hunting can be both exciting and stressful and it’s one of the biggest purchases most people make in their lives. When it comes to financing your home or business, Northwood Mortgage can answer all your mortgage questions, taking the edge off an exasperating experience.

What does a mortgage broker do?

A mortgage broker secures financing for you. He or she can steer you in the right direction and provide guidance on what would be most beneficial to your personal situation. A broker knows the marketplace and is constantly in touch with banks and other lenders to get you the best mortgage possible. Mortgage agents work for mortgage brokers who hold licences.

Who pays them?

The bank or lender is responsible for paying the broker’s commission. That amount depends upon how much you’ve borrowed.

Fixed mortgage

You’ll be paying the same amount in principal and interest for the term of your mortgage no matter what interest rates do. Many homebuyers prefer this type of mortgage because they know what to expect even though there’s a chance interest rates may drop. It’s a tradeoff for stability.

Variable mortgage

Keep an eye on the prime rate because with a variable mortgage you’ll be paying according to what interest rates do. There is a chance you may have to pay more if the rate increases, but on the other hand, you’ll shell out less if rates drop.

Open versus closed rates

An open rate can be variable or fixed. It’s generally more flexible and has a higher rate of interest than a closed mortgage. You can pay it off or make more payments with any penalty. A closed rate can also be variable or fixed. Most folks opt for closed rate mortgages since the rates are lower, but you can only pay on the principal as stated. Paying it out early will net you penalties.

What about the Canadian Mortgage and Housing Corporation (CMHC)?

This government corporation gives residential homebuyers default loan insurance, providing assistance to those who find it financially cumbersome when it comes to buying a house. This insurance will cost you anywhere from 1.75 to 2.95 per cent of the entire amount of your mortgage. It gives banks and lenders protection in case you can’t pay your mortgage. You must be a Canadian citizen to take advantage of what CMHC offers.

Northwood Mortgage is one of the largest mortgage brokerage firms in the Greater Toronto Area and we know the ins and outs of the lending world and will be able to answer any queries you have. Not only do we arrange mortgages for homebuyers, but we also work with investors and those in the industrial and commercial sectors to arrange loans in the millions of dollars.

With all there is to know about mortgages and all the terms that come with that information, your best course of action is to call Northwood Mortgage. One of more than 200 experts available will tell you about their exemplary services.

Source: http://www.NorthwoodMortgage.com

 

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6 ways a mortgage is like a relationship

Is your financial health being damaged by a toxic relationship with your mortgage?

Many years ago, every date had a chaperone. Today, though a chaperone is no longer required, some of us still like to have input from friends and family as to how suitable a potential partner is for us. The same goes when getting a mortgage. Friends and family are your relationship experts, while mortgage professionals are your mortgage experts. Below are some helpful tips for keeping your relationship with your mortgage going smoothly.

Communication is key

It’s never a bad idea to discuss a problem with your partner; you should feel as though you can share your stress with them so you don’t have to deal with it alone. The same goes with your mortgage lender if you’re experiencing any financial difficulties and you can’t make a payment, or you need additional funds to consolidate debts. Talking with your lender is in the best interest of both parties involved. This is especially true if you anticipate a problem, as making sure everyone is aware of the situation makes a solution more likely than if you go into the silent treatment mode.

Don’t let your past poison your present

If you’ve had some credit hiccups in the past, don’t let it stop you from moving on and establishing new positive credit habits. We are all allowed to make bad decisions as long as we learn from them, it’s important to take action and establish good credit as soon as possible to offset the bruised repayment habits. In order to qualify for the lowest rates and most favorable terms, you need to show a potential lender that you’re a good catch. You can do this by moving past the bad and changing your ways, or pay higher rates and a potentially larger downpayment.

Are you really ready to commit?

It can be tough if you get into a relationship and realize a ways into it that you weren’t ready to commit, the same goes for a mortgage. Entering into a commitment that is unaffordable or not sustainable can spell trouble for both partners. A borrower who can’t pay their mortgage is stressed out; a mortgage lender who isn’t receiving payments is calling you non-stop acting like a clingy ex. It’s important to thoroughly analyze whether you’re ready for the commitment you’re about to make.

The good thing is there isn’t as much variety among mortgage options as there is with potential life partners. You can read more online about a mortgage than you can about the person you are thinking of dating, though wouldn’t it be nice if potential partners came with reviews? Is that an app yet?

Revisit the questions you asked in the beginning

Don’t let comfort stop you from meeting any goals you have set for yourself before you enter into a relationship as it’s never too late to keep trying and the same goes for your financing targets. Make sure you’re scheduling regular mortgage check-ups to ensure the terms still align with your lifestyle. The mortgage you had at 25 may not be ideal at age 40, so don’t be afraid to challenge old ideas and explore new options. You may want to consider a more mature home equity line of credit, rather than the trusty default 5-year fixed term. Get into the habit of asking yourself ‘what are you hoping to accomplish in the next year, 5 years, or 10 years, and make sure your financing fits those objectives. 

The first option isn’t always the best choice

Dating a few different people before you decide on the best choice is normal practice; the same should apply to shopping for a mortgage. Exploring the products available while you assess the pros and cons is in your best interest as it ensures you’re getting a solution best suited to your present and future needs. Don’t be afraid to ask questions to gain a thorough understanding of what you’re getting into and feel confident you’re making an educated decision before you enter into any agreement.

Lying can lead to a break-up

Mortgage fraud has been in the headlines more than a few times lately. With that in mind, falsifying information in a new relationship can lead to negative discoveries and a corresponding break-up if it’s a big secret. The same goes with mortgage lenders, if they find out they were lied to, they’re not happy. It’s extra bad because they’ve been burned before and now protect themselves with a clause in their contract stating they can pull back any financing offers immediately if deception is discovered. Don’t take any chances, be honest and upfront and avoid a potentially nasty split.

There’s no magic formula for forging the perfect relationship, the same can be said for finding a mortgage. There are a few key ingredients that go into making it work, like a steady income, good credit and a healthy downpayment or equity position. With all of the little extras that make or break the success of the relationship between a borrower and lender, it comes down to the desire to make it work through persistence, education, and patience.

Source: GoldenGirlFinance.com – February 8th, 2016

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Maple Bank Siezed by OSFI and Cut Off by CMHC

Maple Bank

Maple Bank, a niche securitization player in Canada’s mortgage market, looks like it’s going down.

Banking regulator OSFI has taken control of the bank’s Canadian operations according to the Financial Post, which quotes OSFI Superintendent Jeremy Rudin as saying, “We are guided by our mandate, which is to protect the depositors and creditors of the Canadian branch and have taken this step to safeguard their interests.”

On top of that, CMHC has terminated Maple as an approved issuer of mortgage-backed securities (MBS). CMHC made this statement:

Effective immediately, Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation (CMHC) has suspended Maple Bank GmbH – Toronto Branch as an Approved Issuer of National Housing Act Mortgage-Backed Securities (NHA MBS). The suspension is the result of restrictions placed on the operations of Maple Bank GmbH by Germany’s Federal Financial Supervisory Authority (BaFin) that affect its ability to fulfill its obligations as an Approved Issuer.

CMHC provides a timely payment guarantee of interest and principal to NHA MBS investors. CMHC’s guarantee of NHA MBS issued by Maple Bank GmbH – Toronto Branch are not impacted by the suspension.

Here is a good summary from Handelsblatt about what triggered Maple’s woes → Link.

 

maple bank chart

Maple Bank is probably not coming back. National Bank has already written off its 25% stake. That’s disappointing for the mortgage market because, while Maple was a small player in the MBS market, it was still a player. And in a market where MBS spreads have widened significantly in the last year, the market needs all the liquidity it can get. (MBS spreads refer to the extra yield that mortgage investors demand on top of safe government bonds.)

According to sources, Maple bought mortgages from a handful of non-bank lenders. It also provided warehouse facilities (i.e., short-term capital to fund mortgages until they’re sold to investors). Lenders would take funded mortgages, package them up, sell them to Maple and then Maple (as a former CMHC-approved issuer) would issue MBS and/or sell those mortgage pools into the Canada Mortgage Bond (CMB) program. This provided cheaper funding for lenders than simply selling their mortgage commitments to big institutional buyers.

Based on CMHC data, Maple was ranked 21st out of 82 MBS issuers in terms of market share, with $3.49 billion of MBS outstanding out of $441 billion industry-wide.

“Losing any funder is never good,” said one lender executive who preferred not to be quoted. “All of their mortgages were originated in the broker space.” That leaves big securities firms like TD Securities, RBC Dominion Securities, National Bank Financial and Merrill Lynch as the main buyers of broker-originated mortgages. “If it’s just big players left, it’s not positive for consumers,” he added, noting that less competition raises funding costs for bank challengers.

Side story: On an unrelated positive note, we hear that Laurentian Bank is now going to be a player in the securitization space. That is very welcome news for broker lenders. More from Bloomberg.

None of this should cause investors in Canada’s MBS market to lose confidence. What sunk Maple Bank was unrelated to Canada’s housing or securitization markets. CMHC is now managing its MBS to ensure investors get paid as expected. The housing agency sent CMT this statement today:

Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation’s (CMHC) guarantee of NHA MBS issued by Maple Bank GmbH – Toronto Branch is not impacted by the suspension, therefore there is no impact on MBS investors.  Furthermore, this suspension will have no impact on homeowners or mortgage holders.

CMHC has taken control of the NHA MBS and related mortgage cash flows and provides a timely payment guarantee of interest and principal to NHA MBS investors.

CMHC has previously had four issuer defaults in the early 1990s. No MBS payments to investors were ever missed and CMHC did not incur any losses on these previous issuer defaults.

We’re told by other sources that CMHC has never lost money by guaranteeing NHA MBS, even when issuers default. That’s thanks in part to the excess spread that’s earned between the mortgage interest (paid by borrowers) and the MBS interest (paid to investors). 

“The [MBS] trades themselves are fine; but with Maple now essentially closed for business…whoever was using them will have to find alternative funding…” said one capital markets pro we spoke with. Fortunately, all lenders who relied on Maple have backup funders, we’re told.

As for small Canadian depositors, the fallout is limited. Maple’s latest annual report notes: “The Toronto branch specializes in lending businesses, in particular the acquisition of mortgage loans for securitization, and deposit taking.” According to OSFI, however, Maple Bank is a foreign bank “authorized under the Bank Act to establish branches in Canada to carry on banking business in Canada.” Foreign banks cannot generally “accept deposits of less than $150,000” in Canada.

Maple’s last report noted that its “securitization business grew significantly” through 2014. And now it’s gone; just like that.

Source: Canadian Mortgage Trends  February 10, 2016  Robert McLister  

Maple Bank

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CBC FORUM House keys sent to the bank? Your thoughts on mortgage defaults

The federal government is worried about Albertans making strategic defaults on their mortgages.

 

Some Albertans are walking away from their mortgages by putting their keys in the mail and sending them back to the bank.

It’s a phenomenon known as jingle mail — sparked by a combination of high debt and lost jobs — and was a big problem in Alberta back in the 1980s.

As a result, the federal government is watching the Alberta market closely. Jingle mail, or strategic defaults, weaken the housing market and increase loan losses among Canada’s banks, say experts.

We asked what this means to you: Does your mortgage keep you awake at night? What would make you send your house keys to the bank? Any personal mortgage anecdotes you want to share?

You weighed in via CBC Forum, our new experiment to encourage a different kind of discussion on our website. Here are some of the best comments made during the discussion.

Please note that user names are not necessarily the names of commenters. Some comments have been altered to correct spelling and to conform to CBC style. Click on the user name to see the comment in the blog format.

Many chimed in with their own mortgage advice.

  • “Sending house keys back to the bank seems very irresponsible. The banks are not going to absorb the costs — customers will be on the hook in the end.” — EOttawa​
  • “People who buy the McMansions in the hopes that someday they will become part of the upper class are the ones who should worry. Big risks have serious consequences. Good luck with it.” —Chris K
  • “No, it doesn’t keep me awake for the simple reason that we bought a home well within our means with a mortgage way lower than what the banks said we could borrow … It’s a question of common sense and priorities.” — docp

There was some discussion on who should be blamed.

  • “Lots of blame and finger pointing to go round. Bottom line, as many others have said, it falls on personal responsibility to make good decisions and sometimes circumstances outside our control force us to make tough decisions to survive — like using ‘jingle mail’ in Alberta.” — Don Watson

Several commenters even had their own jingle mail stories.

  • “My ex-husband and I returned the keys to the bank when it became clear that he was unable to maintain the mortgage payments on the home he had bought before we were married. This happened in the first year of marriage and it was a terrible blow to him. Later he declared bankruptcy.” — LinneaEldred
  • “We purchased our home within our means and have been able to keep up with the payments. We lived in Fort McMurray for four years, after they went through the downturn of the economy in the early 80s. Folks were turning in their keys then and walking away. People still don’t learn from past mistakes.” — Leslie Riley​

There were even some thoughts on the future … or lack of it.

  • “I have a mortgage and I also have a full-time job, yet I still worry about the future of my mortgage. I don’t believe that we need to point out the fact that even if you were or are smart about your money, you cannot predict your future.” — Samantha R.

You can read the full CBC Forum live blog discussion on mortgages below.

Can’t see the forum? Click here

Source: By Haydn Watters, CBC News Posted: Feb 09, 2016 12:26 PM ET

 

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…mortgages made simple…

Slide3

THE RAY C. MCMILLAN ADVANTAGE

The Ray McMillan Mortgage Team  is licensed through Northwood Mortgage Ltd. We deal with major banks, trust, life insurance, finance companies and private lenders. We are licensed to provide the most competitive mortgage rates and terms available for your real estate financing needs throughout Ontario.

OUR SERVICE INCLUDES:

 

  • First and second mortgages
  • Transfers
  • Condominium/Townhouse purchases
  • Home Improvement Loans
  • Construction Loans
  • Debt Consolidation
  • Refinancing
  • Power of Sale
  • Multi-residential
  • Vacant land
  • Cottages and recreational properties
  • Rural and farm properties

 

 

ARE THERE ANY COSTS INVOLVED?

When we arrange a prime residential first mortgage the lender pays us a finder’s fee.This does not affect the rate our terms of the mortgage in any way.

When we arrange any other type of mortgage that does not qualify as a prime residential mortgage then the lender does not pay us. We must then charge a brokerage fee*. The fee is based on the complexity involved to arrange the mortgage.

any-questions

You have mortgage questions, the Ray McMillan Mortgage Team has answers.

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