Category Archives: mortgage marketing

Mortgage rates, charges decisive factors for consumers

A combination of reasonable mortgage rates, no unexpected charges, and special features were the most important factors in consumers’ choice of mortgage originator, according to a recent survey conducted by financial services firm D+H.

The study’s results accompanied the increased popularity of the internet as a valuable resource for would-be borrowers, giving them more confidence in their transactions as well as making them more wary of hidden fees.

“People are asking the right questions. Even a caveman could find the lowest mortgage rates online within seconds. What you can’t learn as easily are the hidden costs, including mind-blowing penalties, inflated blend and increase rates (the rates lenders charge on any new money you add to your mortgage), ridiculous rates to convert from a variable mortgage to a fixed, aggravating fees to switch lenders, restrictions when porting your mortgage, and so on,” mortgage columnist and RateSpy.com founder Robert McLister wrote in a February 28 piece for The Globe and Mail.

McLister stated that the results pointed at the growing importance of a second informed opinion, apart from online information, in determining the best mortgage rates available.
 
“It’s no surprise, then, that two out of three borrowers value the person arranging their mortgage more than the lender itself. And they should. Lender reputation is immaterial compared to proper guidance and mortgage flexibility,” McLister said.

The survey also revealed that the largest contributor to consumer satisfaction is the absence of time pressure, which can be achieved by the broker going the “extra mile” to assist with the details.

“Besides time pressure, the survey found the biggest headaches for borrowers were paperwork, uncertainty about getting the best rate and finding the time to meet with a banker or broker,” McLister noted.

Source: MortgageBrokerNews.ca – by Ephraim Vecina | 02 Mar 2016 

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Big bank makes unique offer to try to entice clients to switch

Scotiabank is currently offering potential clients the chance to switch their mortgage over – and earn 24 free movie passes for their trouble.

Not the most enticing offer – it will save avid movie goers $355, based on ticket prices at downtown Toronto’s most central Cineplex.

However, the bank claims the switching process is easy and that it would even cover transfer and discharge fees.

A fee-free chance to for a client to switch their mortgage and earn free movie passes?

Not quite.

“Discharge and transfer fees – which are usually a couple hundred dollars — are separate form penalties,” Anson Martin, a broker with VericoFair Mortgage Solutions, told MortgageBrokerNews.ca. “Prepayment penalties can be in the thousands.”

Scotiabank does mention prepayment penalties on its website for the promotion. In the fine print, at least.

“Prepayment charges with your existing lender may be applicable if the mortgage has not reached the maturity date,” the bank writes.

This promotion is the latest in a long tradition of big bank ploys to entice other lenders’ clients.

Last September, CIBC ran an advertising campaign that promised clients could switch their mortgages over for free. And earn some cash.

The campaign – which was being pushed online and in print advertisement, including A-frame boards outside branches – told potential clients that, for a limited time, they could switch their mortgage to CIBC for free, and get up to 5% cash back.

A disclaimer did state that the “free” switch doesn’t include existing lender fees.

Source: MortgageBrokerNews.ca  by Justin da Rosa | 07 Jan 2016

Thinking of switching your mortgage? Sit down with and independent mortgage professional and explore all your options. Contact the Ray C. McMillan Mortgage Team or visit www.RayMcMillan.com to schedule your no obligation consultation.

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Toronto Homeowners Get $8,500 Richer Every Month, While Condo Owners Get The Shaft

Bicycle Bob/Flickr

Forget working. The real way to accumulate wealth is to buy a single-family house in Toronto, and wait.

OK, that’s bad advice. But given what’s been going in Toronto’s housing market, you can be forgiven for coming to a conclusion like that.

If you own an average single-family home in Toronto, your net worth has been growing by about $8,500 a month over the past year.

According to the latest numbers from the Toronto Real Estate Board, a single-family home in the 416 now averages $1,053,871, up 10.7 per cent from a year ago. Break down that increase by month, and you get around $8,500.

But in yet another sign of the growing gap between condos and houses, Toronto’s condo dwellers aren’t seeing anywhere near that kind of wealth growth.

The average Toronto condo is now worth $418,603, 5.6 per cent more than a year ago. That works out to a wealth gain of $1,925 a month. Condo owners are growing their wealth at less than one-quarter the pace of homeowners. In the 905 region around Toronto, condo owners are adding only $637 per month in wealth.

Condos just aren’t seeing the same rate of appreciation. While standalone homes in Toronto have grown by 34.8 per cent in price over the past three years, condo prices have gone up only 10.9 per cent in that time.

Say hello to the new face of wealth inequality in Toronto, where owning a back yard is a pass to riches, and owning a balcony is a pass to condo fees.

But so what, you may ask. This value is tied up in the home, it’s not like people can live off it.

Well, yes and no. A growing number of Canadians are taking out home equity lines of credit against the value of their house. The higher the house value, the more they can borrow, and some experts are getting worried Canadians have borrowed too much this way.

And there is also the wealth effect: People change their behaviour when they feel richer, generally buying more than they otherwise would.

This effect seems to be strong in Canada right now. It certainly helps to explain why consumer spending held up in Canada this year despite all the talk of recession, and why imports to Canada are strong even while exports are flailing.

So the money may be stuck in your home, but its effects on the economy are real.

Here’s a breakdown of how much wealth Toronto-area residents are accumulating per month off their real estate.

Single-family homes in Toronto (416):
$8,491 in wealth per month (avg. price $1,053,871, up 10.7 per cent in a year)

Single-family homes in GTA (905):
$6,404 in wealth per month (avg. price $732,852, up 11.6 per cent)

Condos in Toronto (416):
$1,925 in wealth per month (avg. price $418,603, up 5.6 per cent)

Condos in the GTA (905):
$637 in wealth per month (avg. price $307,295, up 2.2 per cent)

Source:  |  By  Posted: 10/06/2015 12:29 pm EDT

To get more information on home ownership and mortgage qualification visit: www.RayMcMillan.com

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Getting a Mortgage

Getting a Mortgage

Once your Offer to Purchase has been accepted, go to see your lender. Your lender will verify (and update, if necessary) your financial information and put together what’s needed to complete the mortgage application. Your lender may ask you to get a property appraisal, a land survey, or both. You may also be asked to get title insurance. Your lender will tell you about the various types of mortgages,terms, interest rates, amortization periods and, payment schedules available.

Depending on your down payment, you may have a conventional mortgage or ahigh-ratio mortgage.

Types of Mortgages

Conventional Mortgage

A conventional mortgage is a mortgage loan that is equal to, or less than, 80% of the lending value of the property. The lending value is the property’s purchase price or market value — whichever is less. For a conventional mortgage, the down payment is at least 20% of the purchase price or market value.

High-ratio Mortgage

If your down payment is less than 20% of the home price, you will typically need a high-ratio mortgage. A high-ratio mortgage usually requires mortgage loan insurance. CMHC is a major provider of mortgage loan insurance. Your lender may add the mortgage loan insurance premium to your mortgage or ask you to pay it in full upon closing.

Mortgage Term

Your lender will tell you about the term options for the mortgage. The term is the length of time that the mortgage contract conditions, including interest rate, will be fixed. The term can be from six months up to ten years. A longer term (for example, five years) lets you plan ahead. It also protects you from interest rate increases. Think carefully about the term that you want, and don’t be afraid to ask your lender to figure out the differences between a one, two, five-year (or longer) term mortgage.

Mortgage Interest Rates

Mortgage interest rates are fixed, variable or adjustable.

Fixed Mortgage Interest Rate

A fixed mortgage interest rate is a locked-in rate that will not increase for the term of the mortgage.

Variable Mortgage Interest Rate

A variable rate fluctuates based on market conditions. The mortgage payment remains unchanged.

Adjustable Mortgage Interest Rate

With an adjustable rate, both the interest rate and the mortgage payment vary, based on market conditions.

Open or Closed Mortgage

Closed Mortgage

A closed mortgage cannot be paid off, in whole or in part, before the end of its term. With a closed mortgage you must make only your monthly payments — you cannot pay more than the agreed payment. A closed mortgage is a good choice if you’d like to have a fixed monthly payment. With it you can carefully plan your monthly expenses. But, a closed mortgage is not flexible. There are often penalties, or restrictive conditions, if you want to pay an additional amount. A closed mortgage may be a poor choice if you decide to move before the end of the term, or if you want to benefit from a decrease of interest rates.

Open Mortgage

An open mortgage is flexible. That means that you can usually pay off part of it, or the entire amount at any time without penalty. An open mortgage can be a good choice if you plan to sell your home in the near future. It can also be a good choice if you want to pay off a large sum of your mortgage loan. Most lenders let you convert an open mortgage to a closed mortgage at any time, although you may have to pay a small fee.

Amortization

Amortization is the length of time the entire mortgage debt will be repaid. Many mortgages are amortized over 25 years, but longer periods are available. The longer the amortization, the lower your scheduled mortgage payments, but the more interest you pay in the long run. If each mortgage term is five years, and the mortgage is amortized over 20 years, you will have to renegotiate the mortgage four times (every five years).

Payment Schedule

A mortgage loan is repaid in regular payments — monthly, biweekly or weekly. More frequent payment schedules (for example weekly) can save some interest costs by reducing the outstanding principal balance more quickly. The more payments you make in a year, the lower the overall interest you have to pay on your mortgage.

Closing Day

Closing day is the day when you finally take legal possession and get to call the house your home. The final signing usually happens at the lawyer or notary’s office.

These are the things that happen on closing day:

  • Your lender will give the mortgage money to your lawyer/notary.
  • You must give the down payment (minus the deposit) to your lawyer/notary. You must also give the remaining closing costs.
  • Your lawyer/notary
    • Pays the vendor
    • Registers the home in your name
    • Gives you the deed and the keys to your new home

Source: Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation

For more information on getting a mortgage, contact the Ray C. McMillan Mortgage Team at 905-813-4354

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Broker: Lender staffing issues leading to last-minute deal issues

Lenders are understaffed and dealing with record volume, according to one former underwriter, which explains the increase in last minute audits and the resulting problems with files.

“There is often another level of review after the underwriter signs off on a deal before it gets funded; the underwriters sometimes miss something and it’s a function of underwriters being overwhelmed,” Tim Hill of Dominion Lending Centres Primex Mortgages told MortgageBrokerNews.ca. “Volumes for lenders are also as high as they’ve ever been, and a lot of documents are being looked at very late in the process.”

Those last minute reviews are done by an auditor that oversees underwriters’ work according to Hill, who worked as an underwriter for Street Capital for over three years before moving to the broker side of the business.

An increasing number of brokers are reporting issues late in the mortgage origination process with last minute audits.

For his part, Robert Clancy of Verico Safebridge Financial argues these last minute audits are being exacerbated by lenders who all interpret mortgage regulations differently.

“A lot of the time there is an issue with conditions being added on by lenders at the end of deal; all of a sudden lenders call and ask for more documents,” Clancy told MortgageBrokerNews.ca. “It seems to be the monolines grappling with the regulation changes; everyone seems to be interpreting them differently.”

One specific example Clancy encountered was when a lender requested – at the last minute –that a number of debts to be paid down.

“They requested this days before closing, and even though we showed them their calculations were wrong they still forced us to deal with it.”

Luckily Clancy was able to work with the client and eventually got the deal funded. But not all brokers have the same luck at the last minute.

Source: MortgageBrokerNews.ca by Justin da Rosa | 02 Sep 2015
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Your HomeBuyingTeam – What Professionals Should You Call On?

Your HomeBuyingTeam - What Professionals Should You Call On?

Your HomeBuyingTeam

What Professionals Should You Call On?

Even if this isn’t your first homebuying experience, you’ll want to get help from a team of professionals. Having the help of professionals will give you experienced and knowledgeable people for reliable information and answers to your questions. These are the people who can help you:
•Realtor
•Lenders or mortgage broker
•Lawyer or notary
•Insurance broker
•Home inspector
•Appraiser
•Land surveyor
•Builder or contractor

You will be doing a lot of interviewing to establish your team. Use this handy CMHC worksheet to help you keep track of the people you interview and the ones you finally choose.

The next sections describe each professional role.

The Realtor

Your realtor’s job is to:
•Help you find the ideal home
•Write an Offer of Purchase
•Negotiate to help you get the best possible deal
•Give you important information about the community
•Help you arrange a home inspection

Finding a Realtor

When looking for a realtor, don’t be afraid to ask questions — especially about possible service charges. Normally, the seller pays a commission to the agent. But, some realtors charge buyers a fee for their services. Use the CMHC worksheet Checklist for Evaluating Realtors to help you.
If you would like to know more about a realtor’s ethical obligations, go to the Canadian Real Estate Association’s website at www.crea.ca, or call your local real estate association.

The Lender or Mortgage Broker

Many different institutions lend money for mortgages — banks, trust companies, credit unions, caisses populaires (in Quebec), pension funds, insurance companies, and finance companies. Different institutions offer different terms and options — shop around!

Mortgage brokers don’t work for any specific lending institution. Their role is to find the lender with the terms and rates that are best for the buyer.

Finding a Lender or Mortgage Broker
•Ask around. Your realtor, another professional, family members, or friends may give you helpful suggestions.
•Look in the Yellow Pages™ under “Banks,” “Credit Unions” or “Trust Companies” for a lender and under “Mortgage Brokers” for a broker.
•Contact the Canadian Association of Accredited Mortgage Professionals at 1-888-442-4625, or visit the Association’s website at www.caamp.org.

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The Lawyer/Notary

Having a lawyer/notary involved in the process will help ensure that things go as smoothly as possible. You need a lawyer (or a notary in Quebec) to perform these tasks:
•Protect your legal interests by making sure the property you want to buy does not have any building or statutory liens, charges, or work or clean-up orders
•Review all contracts before you sign them, especially the Offer (or Agreement) to Purchase.

Finding a Lawyer

Law associations can refer you to lawyers who specialize in real estate law. In Quebec, contact the Chambre des notaires du Québec for the names of notaries specializing in real estate law.

Remember that a lawyer/notary should:
•Be a licensed full-time lawyer/notary
•Live/work in the area
•Understand real estate laws, regulations and restrictions
•Have realistic and acceptable fees
•Be able and willing to explain things in language you can easily understand
•Be experienced with condominiums, if that’s what you are buying

Lawyer/notary fees depend on the complexity of the transaction and the lawyer’s expertise.

Shop around for rates when choosing your lawyer/notary. Use the CMHC worksheet Checklist for Selecting a Lawyer/Notary to guide you.

The Insurance Broker

An insurance broker can help you with your property insurance and mortgage life insurance.

Lenders insist on property insurance because your property is their security for your loan. Property insurance covers the replacement cost of your home, so the size of your premium depends on the value of the property.

Your lender may also suggest that you buy mortgage life insurance. Mortgage life insurance gives coverage for your family, if you die before your mortgage is paid off. Your lender may offer this type of insurance. In this case, the lender adds the premium to your regular mortgage payments. However, you may want to compare rates offered by an insurance broker and by your lender.

Don’t confuse property insurance, or mortgage life insurance, with mortgage loan insurance.

The Home Inspector

Whether you are buying a resale home, or a new home, consider having it inspected by a knowledgeable and professional home inspector.

The home inspector’s role is to inform you about the property’s condition observed at the time of the inspection. The home inspector will tell you if something is not working properly, needs to be changed, or is unsafe. He or she will also tell you if repairs are needed, and maybe even where there were problems in the past.

A home inspection is a visual inspection. It should include a visual assessment of at least the following:
•Foundation
•Doors and windows
•Roof and exterior walls (except winter)
•Attics
•Plumbing and electrical systems (where visible)
•Heating and air conditioning systems
•Ceilings, walls and floors
•Insulation (where visible)
•Ventilation
•The lot, including drainage away from buildings, slopes and natural vegetation
•Overall opinion of structural integrity of the buildings
•Common areas (in the case of a condominium/strata or co-operative)

Finding a Home Inspector

It’s important to hire a knowledgeable, experienced and competent home inspector. In most areas of Canada, there are no licensing or certification requirements for home inspectors. Anyone can say that they are a home inspector without having taken any courses, passed tests or even inspected houses. So look for a home inspector who belongs to a provincial or industry association holds an accreditation that demonstrates training and experience, provides inspection reports, carries insurance, provides references and has strong experience with the type of home to be inspected.

While CMHC does not recommend any individual home inspector or association, CMHC supports a common national occupational standard for home inspectors such as the home inspection industry’s voluntary and independent national certification program.

Home inspector fees range, depending on the size and condition of the home.

The Appraiser

Before you make an offer, an independent appraisal can tell you what the property is worth. This will help ensure that you are not paying too much. In order to complete a mortgage loan, your lender may ask for a recognized appraisal.

The appraisal should include:
•Unbiased assessment of the property’s physical and functional characteristics
•Analysis of recent comparable sales
•Assessment of current market conditions affecting the property

Finding an Appraiser

Ask your realtor to help you find an appraiser.

The Land Surveyor

If the seller does not have a Survey or Certificate of Location, you will probably need to get one for your mortgage application. If the Survey in the seller’s possession is older than five years, it needs to be updated.

Remember that you must have permission from the property owner before hiring a surveyor to go onto the property. Ask your realtor to help co-ordinate this with the owner.

Finding a Land Surveyor

Search the web or Yellow Pages™ or ask your realtor to help you find a land surveyor.

#mortgagesmadesimple

Borrowing is tougher for self-employed

Homebuyers looking for a mortgage are finding conditions are getting tougher if they are self-employed, at a time when there is an increasing number of self-employed Canadians. Solid credit scores are multiple years in business are still not making it easy for business owners to buy their own home. Chad Oyhenart, a Vancouver-based mortgage broker at Dominion Lending Centres told The Financial Post that conditions are tougher as the result of rule changes over the past 7 years: “They just want to make sure that they’re not putting Canadians into situations that they can’t get out of, so that we don’t end up being the U.S.” Jeff Mark of Spin Mortgage also sounded a supportive note for tighter regulations commenting that they were too loose in the past. He says that the self-employed may have to take larger incomes from their businesses, meaning more tax to pay, in order to qualify for mortgages.
Source: MortgageBrokerNews.ca Steve Randall | 24 Jul 2015