Category Archives: new construction

What happens when builders can’t get financing?

Source: Real Estate Professional – by Neil Sharma10 Nov 2017

In the wake of Castlepoint Numa’s announcement that it failed to secure financing for Museum Flats, the highly touted and anticipated Junction Triangle condo development, many purchasers feel like they’ve been left hung out to dry in a market that’s grown more expensive.

By one purchaser’s account, this is the second time Castlepoint has informed his family that it will not be completing a development.

According to Akshay Dev, a sales agent with REMAX Realty One, researching builders is paramount. If he’d ever encountered a builder who failed to secure financing, he’d steer clear of them.

“I haven’t had a situation like that in my portfolio yet, but definitely before we get into projects I like to do some research about the builder to make sure they have a certain reputation, background and that they have credibility,” Dev told REP. “Some builders I like working with, and some I keep my paws off.”

Dev is frequently invited to development launches, which are good places to conduct due diligence. He likes to scrutinize the builder and their past projects, as well as determine whether or not problems could arise at any point during their latest build.

He added that, because banks typically provide financing when a development is 70% sold, a developer unable to secure financing might hint at other problems.

“If a builder is pulling out of a project, it means they lack credibility right there,” he said. “If a developer cannot achieve [70% sales], it means there’s something wrong there. Either the project or location aren’t good, or they don’t have the experience to handle the whole situation.

While Dev hasn’t had a builder fail to bring a project to market, he would tell his clients not to renegotiate with them for a relaunch, or even buy a unit in a future project.

“I would advise them to walk away. If they reached a point where they haven’t gotten financing, there’s a lot more involved in this. If you’re going to talk to a builder about getting financing, what is the guarantee that they’ll get it, and what’s the guarantee there won’t be problems afterwards? It’s a credibility issue right there and then.”

Zia Abbas, owner and president of Realty Point, agrees with that sentiment, and added that, as a sales agent, his reputation is on the line as well.

“As far as I’m concerned, whenever I go and sell any product to my client, for me the credibility of the builder is as important as the location of the project,” said Abbas, adding a builder’s credibility is in their portfolio. “What if we find the best of the best location but the project won’t proceed because the builder doesn’t have the reputation?”

Abbas admits that some builders he’s spoken to have said that they could pull out of the project and bring it back to market at higher price points that better reflect Toronto’s hot market, they wouldn’t sully their reputations that way.

“They’ll stick with the promises made, and this is what is called credibility,” he said.

But that doesn’t mean unscrupulous builders never give in to temptation.

Such builders don’t just damage sales agents’ reputations, they also lose the latter money.

“I’ve never worked with these builders and I’m not going to work with any builder with whom I’m not comfortable because the money I’m making on commission is all future commission,” he said. “There would be nothing in my hand. What if the project doesn’t go through? I’m going to lose time, money and credibility in front of my client.”

Abbas has been selling in throughout the GTA for a long time and says he’s had a couple of builders pull out of projects. Clients’ deposits were returned with nominal interest. As a veteran sales agent, he knows how to keep builders like that at arm’s length.

Toronto city councillor Ana Bailao recently went on record as saying that there needs to be more protection for purchasers like the ones who won’t be moving into Museum Flats.

Dev agrees.

Purchasers’ deposits are held in trust, but there have been cases in the past in which rogue builders and lawyers took off with the monies.

“Anybody who has invested money in real estate is investing hard earned money,” he said, “and hoping to grow that money and take their net worth to next level. We need to make sure wherever they put their money is safe. If they invest in certain people who don’t have a proven track record, then they are risking their investments. If you go to credible builders, chances are your money is safe, your project will be completed, the builder will get financing and deliver you a quality product. And with the right market conditions, you’ll get a good return on your investment.”

Advertisements
Tagged , , , , , ,

The one market to target in Toronto?

It may be the one market many investors are now overlooking, but one industry veteran argues Toronto is still a great buy for potential landlords.

“Everyone is concerned about all the condos being built in Toronto but every year there are 81,000 new permanent residents coming to the city,” Andrew Adams, vice president of finance and investments for Capital Developments, told Canadian Real Estate Wealth. “Compare that to the 95,000 total new residents in Toronto; prices and rents are growing.”

Prices in Toronto jumped 14.9% year-over-year in February to $685,728. Condos, however, remain a more affordable option at an average of $403,392.

One neighbourhood Adams is bullish on is the Yonge and Eglinton area in mid-town Toronto.
“The Yonge and Eglinton area is one of the strongest markets for investors in Toronto,” Andrew Adams, vice president of finance and investments for Capital Developments, told Canadian Real Estate Wealth. “It’s got the Yonge line and the Eglinton LRT and it’s one of the strongest rental markets in the city.”

According to Adams, there are two types of condo buildings available in the neighbourhood; older, circa 1970 apartment-style condos and new-build condos that boast modern amenities and finishes.
The older condos often yield rents in the $2.60-$3.00 per square-foot range, while the newer units earn investors, on average $3.00-$3.50 per square-foot, Adams says.

“The Yonge and Eglinton neighbourhood has everything you need; the RioCan Centre has recently been updated, it has great access to public transit, and its surrounded by great amenities,” he said.

Source: Canadian Real Estate Wealth by Justin da Rosa 23 Mar 2016

Tagged , , , , , , ,

Four things people always forget to check when buying a new home

Buying a home is no easy task.

With so many open houses and so many choices, by the time you find a property that just has that right feeling, you’re usually tempted to grab for the pen and sign your life away. Take a minute though; because people often get so lost in the appeal of the home and property itself, they forget to consider the surrounding neighbourhood. And believe us, your new home can really lose its luster if its located say, a 30-minute drive away from the nearest grocery store or school. That’s why Canada AM hosts sat down with Real Estate Expert Sandra Rinomato, so that you can get the home you want, in the neighbourhood you want it in.

CONSIDER YOUR LIFESTYLE

Whether you have pets, or are extremely active or consider yourself a foodie–these factors can all influence the areas in which you might want to live. So take a second to think about all the things that are important to you, Rinomato says. Maybe you want a short commute, or want to be in close proximity to a dog park, or restaurants and shopping centres. This should be the first thing you do after figuring out your financing and having an idea of what you can afford.

WALK SCORE

If you don’t own a car or plan to rent the property out in the future, a solid walk score can go a long way (the higher, the better). A walk score is based on your ability to walk from the property in question to things like banks, transit, shopping centres and so forth. Rental tenants can be lured in by a high walk score, and it’s generally a plus to know that convenient services aren’t very far away.

SCHOOL DISTRICT

It’s really easy to move into a new home and then realize it’s nowhere near or a school, or the kind of school you wanted to enroll your children into. Fortunately, there are many resources available online that can show you what kinds of schools are in your area (Ontario’s is right here).

EMERGING NEIGHBOURHOODS

By the time you have everything sorted–the neighbourhood, the school, the walk score, etc.–you might realize there’s no property that checks all of your boxes. Don’t worry, that’s normal. But often, it means sacrifices have to be made and you may have to look outside of your ideal neighbourhood. If this happens, Rinomato has some advice for how to find emerging neighbourhoods, where costs are still low but will rapidly rise in the future. The best way to find these spots is to look at the periphery of areas that are already hot and popular. As the population grows in the core, development will spread to the fringes.

Source; theloop.ca – FEB 26

Tagged , ,

Mississauga Set to Welcome Another Iconic High-Rise

The urbanization of Mississauga is continuing with the emergence of another stylish, modern high-rise condominium.

While City Centre has been the focus of most condo developers, some companies are looking beyond Square One to fast growing neighbourhoods in need of sleeker and more urbane skylines. With the Erin Mills area growing fairly rapidly, Daniels has cornered the market and erected three buildings in Erin Mills Parkway and Eglinton region. The brand built the West Tower Residential Condominiums and the Skyrise Rental Residence in the neighbourhood and is about to put its third Erin Mills property — Arc Condominiums — on sale.

“We have very deep roots in this [neighbourhood],” says Daniels spokesperson Dominic Tompa. “We’ve been building there since the 80s.”

When we say Daniels has the market cornered, we don’t mean it simply boasts more buildings than other developers. It has a literal community in the area, known as Daniels Erin Mills. The company calls the area a “mixed use” community designed for residents who want to “live, work, play, grow and shop” in and around their home.

Targeting the growing Erin Mills area is wise. For years, the sleepy neighbourhood was content to be home to Erin Mills Town Centre, Credit Valley Hospital and pockets of family homes. There was ample living space, but not a lot of options for play (unless you count the long-dead EMTC mini-golf course and Montana’s). With EMTC being reinvigorated by a dramatic facelift and more shops and restos popping up in the community, the time to further urbanize the evolving space was ‘nigh.

While some people shake their fists at any new skyscraper, it’s hard to deny that Arc is going to look pretty cool.

“The design is very unique,” says Tompa. “It has a luxury cruise ship feel, so it’ll be unique for the skyline. It has a lot of character. We’ve got 15,000 sq. ft. of retail space and two floors (or 50,000 sq. ft.) of office space [going into the building]. People will be able to work and shop there.”

When Arc is built, the three buildings (Arc, West Tower and Skyrise) will share an exclusive space that will boast an outdoor courtyard, gardening plots, a running track and more.

“It’ll anchor the community,” Tompa says. “We’re bringing in the farmer’s market as well. Backyard Farmer’s Market will be in the plaza area in the base of the Arc.”

In terms of amenities, Arc’s offerings are not dissimilar from other Mississauga high-rises. Residents can expect a full-court gymnasium, fitness centre, outdoor terrace with barbecues, a bookable lounge and meeting space, a smaller lounge with comfy seats and a bookable party room.

As far as prices go, people shopping for affordable condos will be pleased to know that some units start in the low 200,000s. In terms of design, features and finishes are selected by interior design company HOKand the uniquely-shaped suites (which will be influenced by the curvaceous design of the building) will boast nine foot ceilings, laminate flooring, quartz countertops, custom-designed cabinetry with soft-close drawers and stainless steel appliances.

In terms of demand, Tompa says Daniels is seeing a lot of interest.

“We’re just starting to be out there with the building itself and a lot of people are waiting for it to come out.”

Since Daniels has been present in the area for three decades, Tompa has noticed an interesting trend in terms of demographics. Rather than primarily attracting first-time homebuyers or singles, the condos are appealing to long-time residents who are ready to downsize within their long-term neighbourhood.

“It’s really interesting, we had a lot of local buyers who wanted to downsize to West Tower,” he says, agreeing that Daniels has, in this case, sort of been able to follow and adhere to the lifestyle requirements of residents moving through the lifecycle. “You can walk to the hospital, which is good for people who have retired. It’s across the street from the mall and restaurants. It’s a really nice location and even though it’s Mississauga, you could live here and not need a car.”

For those interested in purchasing a unit, registrants can join the Arc Condominiums Inner Circle by visiting the website. Inner Circle members will receive an invitation to attend the first advance sale before the public gets a kick at the can. They’ll also get a more comprehensive selection of suites, floors and views. If you’re interested in joining, expect to pay a one-time fee of $300. That $300 will be applied towards your purchase or, in the event you decide not to buy an Arc suite, refunded in full.

As for the retail space, Tompa says Daniels does its best to curate the occupying businesses to suit resident’s needs.

“We try to curate a community. You need a place to shop and be entertained and play. It’s a place to spend your time. The east side of Arc will have the retail space and it’s a little too early to know who will occupy it. There [will be] a restaurant at the base and a pharmacy. We try to get the right fit for the community.”

As for when units will go on sale, Tompa expects people will be able to start purchasing in late May or early June. The building will offer everything from studio suites to three-bedroom units.

“There’s a growing demand for three-bedroom units. Some people are coming from 200,000 sq. ft. houses and still want the extra space and other [residents] are families with children. We’re recognizing and accommodating that demand.”

Click on link to get more info on this new condo development. 

Source: Insauga.com by Ashley Newport on February 24, 2016

Tagged , , , , ,

Do you know the biggest cost of your new home?

New road construction is one of the infrastructure costs built into development charges.

Development charges are making it more difficult for young families to afford new homes.

So what are development charges? Ontario’s cities and towns pass bylaws to set development charges. They use these charges to collect money from new homes and businesses to pay for critical infrastructure: sewers and water pipes, roads, transit, parks and community centres. There is no doubting their importance.

The Development Charges Act is the over-arching provincial legislation that allows municipalities to collect them.

These bylaws are accompanied by a background study, which outlines the estimated amount and location of development within a municipality, and the related calculations of how the new services will accommodate the new population.

The topic of development charges (DCs) is part of the province’s 80-day public consultation on improving the land use planning and appeals system. I have been writing about the consultation in this space over the past few weeks and will continue to discuss it until the consultation ends on Jan. 10.

BILD and the Ontario Home Builders’ Association addressed DCs during a recent meeting held at our office that sought input from both associations’ members. The province is our partner in economic growth, and we have a lot to say about DCs’ effect on this growth.

In 2012 alone, the industry estimates that more than $1 billion was paid in DCs by new-home owners across the GTA.

But at the end of the day, DCs and other taxes represent one-fifth of the cost of a home in the GTA, according to a study of six GTA municipalities by Altus Group Economic Consulting. That is too much for a young family to take on.

The study involved Toronto, Markham, Oakville, Bradford West Gwillimbury, Ajax and Brampton.

Since 2004, those municipalities have increased DCs between 143 and 357 per cent.

Let’s look at the Town of Oakville, as one example: for a new single-detached home, Oakville charges $23,503 in DCs; Halton Region charges $36,778; Oakville’s school boards charge $4,175 in educational DCs to allow them to acquire land for schools. In total, that new-home owner is paying $64,456 in DCs.

Those DCs are added to new-home owners’ mortgages, and they must pay the interest on those charges for decades.

When DCs are the biggest charge on a home, they pose a threat to the affordability of homes and even the health of the home-building industry.

It’s important to note that our industry employs about 202,700 people and generates $10.8 billion in wages.

 

During the current 80-day provincial consultation, now is the time for citizens ton tell the province about what they think is fair and reasonable to be charged by the municipalities.

Municipalities do have other alternatives to raise revenue. And it’s time they looked at their other options.

 

This column has been updated from a previous version.

Bryan Tuckey is President and CEO of the Building Industry and Land Development Association and a land-use planner who has worked for municipal, regional and provincial governments. Follow him at twitter.com/bildgta , facebook.com/bildgta , and bildblogs.ca.

Tagged , ,

This $11,918,000 Vaughan penthouse is all glamour on main floor, all pool party on the roof

Possibly the most glamorous condo in the 905, the penthouse of One Cordoba Drive suggests a suite that might be at home in Dubai or Hong Kong or somewhere as exotic. Sitting atop a mid-rise building at Bathurst and Steeles, just north of the Toronto municipal border, the two-level unit offers more than 16,000 square feet on two entire floors. The estate, for that is what is must be called, includes four bedrooms, 11 bathrooms, a full-size bar, a private seven-car garage and more.

Harvey Kalles Real Estate

Harvey Kalles Real Estate

Okay, since you asked, here’s the rest of the listing’s luxurious features: You’ll be able to seat 30 for dinner in the columned dining room, which is open to the palatial living room and its sleek steel-and-glass spiral staircase. A direct private elevator will take you to the main floor or to the rooftop, where there’s a full-size swimming pool, spa and full-size stainless steel chef’s kitchen. The entire rooftop is protected by a retractable glass roof that makes the space usable year-round. The 360-degree views from the indoor/outdoor patio are bested only by the potential for summer star-gazing from the comfort of your own in-pool floatie (with a glass of Champagne on hand from your poolside bar, of course).

Harvey Kalles Real Estate

Harvey Kalles Real Estate

The residence is entirely custom-designed, with inlaid marble floors, arched doorways, massive mouldings, full-height windows on every side, and 15-foot ceilings.

Harvey Kalles Real Estate

Harvey Kalles Real Estate

This home is ideal for those who need space in which to entertain. Have an elegant cocktail party with a jazz pianist on the main floor, while the children go wild upstairs in the pool. Teens can be entertained in the home theatre. Also included are a smart-home system, a home office with private terrace, a sauna and a gym.

Yours through Jamie Erlick at Harvey Kalles Real Estate, for $11,918,000.

Source: Shari Kulha | Last Updated: Nov 26 11:45 AM ET

Tagged , , , ,

Whole blocks of Yonge St. boarded up as condos soar

yonge street condos

Toronto is a city undergoing massive transformation, a fact which is underscored with particular weight when one walks up its main artery. Long the heart of hodgepodge retail in Toronto, Yonge St. is in the midst of being reborn as the city’s primary condo corridor.

The process got underway a while ago with developments like Aura and One Bloor East, but the condo machine is working overdrive now with so many developments in the works that the previous character of the street will be forever changed.

yonge street condosPerhaps it’s already happened. Walking north of College, one encounters two sprawling blocks of demolished and boarded up buildings. Further north at Bloor, a soon-to-be-finished skyscraper casts a shadow on a collection of heritage buildings boarded up and awaiting restoration before a new tower rises above them.

yonge street condosOne is tempted to say that Toronto looks like Detroit in these instances, but the comparison is unfair given that the hoarding is temporary. Soon, polished brick and lots of metal and glass will takeover. What you do have, however, is a last image of old Yonge St. The two storey block to be demolished at Yonge and Alexander, for instance, dates back to the late 1970s, when the street was at its grittiest glory.

yonge street condosLet’s channel Don Draper and say “change is neither good or bad — it simply is.” Getting too misty eyed about massive development on Yonge St. would be to ignore that fact that this is exactly where condos should be built in the city, right above our best served subway line.

yonge street condosNevertheless, one should note and perhaps mourn a certain version of Toronto that’s in steep decline. The mom and pop shops on Yonge St. all have an expiry date now. With two massive developments planned at Gerrard, Remington’s isn’t long for this world. Zanzibar will hold out longer, but it too will be consumed.

yonge street condosSome developments are kind to street level retail and the heritage of this centuries old thoroughfare, but the head shops and indie restaurants (so long Papaya Hut) can’t afford the increased rent, and so corporate blandness sets in even as the buildings are beautifully restored. Am I the only one who will miss the Kleen Air Shoes sign?

Each major intersection from Bloor St. south to the Massey Tower project near Queen St. is in various stages of redevelopment along Yonge St.. But right now, it’s the area just north of College that tells the story of the street. With one foot in the future and the other in the past, the state of things here is like an allegory for the whole city.

We’re growing up, but lots is being left behind.

Source: Blog TO  Derek Flack / NOVEMBER 3, 2015

Tagged , , , , , ,