Category Archives: real estate

Millions of Americans still trapped in debt-logged homes ten years after crisis

EAST STROUDSBURG, Pa., 2018 (Reuters) – School bus driver Michael Payne was renting an apartment on the 30th floor of a New York City high-rise, where the landlord’s idea of fixing broken windows was to cover them with boards.

Click here to hear Payne’s story. 

So when Payne and his wife Gail saw ads in the tabloids for brand-new houses in the Pennsylvania mountains for under $200,000, they saw an escape. The middle-aged couple took out a mortgage on a $168,000, four-bedroom home in a gated community with swimming pools, tennis courts and a clubhouse.

“It was going for the American Dream,” Payne, now 61, said recently as he sat in his living room. “We felt rich.”

Today the powder-blue split-level is worth less than half of what they paid for it 12 years ago at the peak of the nation’s housing bubble.

Located about 80 miles northwest of New York City in Monroe County, Pennsylvania, their home resides in one of the sickest real estate markets in the United States, according to a Reuters analysis of data provided by a leading realty tracking firm. More than one-quarter of homeowners in Monroe County are deeply “underwater,” meaning they still owe more to their lenders than their houses are worth.

The world has moved on from the global financial crisis. Hard-hit areas such as Las Vegas and the Rust Belt cities of Pittsburgh and Cleveland have seen their fortunes improve.

But the Paynes and about 5.1 million other U.S. homeowners are still living with the fallout from the real estate bust that triggered the epic downturn.

As of June 30, nearly one in 10 American homes with mortgages were “seriously” underwater, according to Irvine, California-based ATTOM Data Solutions, meaning that their market values were at least 25 percent lower than the balance remaining on their mortgages.

It is an improvement from 2012, when average prices hit bottom and properties with severe negative equity topped out at 29 percent, or 12.8 million homes. Still, it is double the rate considered healthy by real estate analysts.

“These are the housing markets that the recovery forgot,” said Daren Blomquist, a senior vice president at ATTOM.

Lingering pain from the crash is deep. But it has fallen disproportionately on commuter towns and distant exurbs in the eastern half of the United States, a Reuters analysis of county real estate data shows. Among the hardest hit are bedroom communities in the Midwest, mid-Atlantic and Southeast regions, where income and job growth have been weaker than the national norm.

Reuters Graphic

Developments in outlying communities typically suffer in downturns. But a comeback has been harder this time around, analysts say, because the home-price run-ups were so extreme, and the economies of many of these Midwestern and Eastern metro areas have lagged those of more vibrant areas of the country.

A home is seen in the Penn Estates development where most of the homeowners are underwater on their mortgages in East Straudsburg, Pennsylvania, U.S., June 20, 2018. REUTERS/Mike Segar

“The markets that came roaring back are the coastal markets,” said Mark Zandi, chief economist at Moody’s Analytics. He said land restrictions and sales to international buyers have helped buoy demand in those areas. “In the middle of the country, you have more flat-lined economies. There’s no supply constraints. All of these things have weighed on prices.”

In addition to exurbs, military communities showed high concentrations of underwater homes, the Reuters analysis showed. Five of the Top 10 underwater counties are near military bases and boast large populations of active-duty soldiers and veterans.

Many of these families obtained financing through the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs. The VA makes it easy for service members to qualify for mortgages, but goes to great lengths to prevent defaults. It is a big reason many military borrowers have held on to their negative-equity homes even as millions of civilians walked away.

A poor credit history can threaten a soldier’s security clearance. And those who default risk never getting another VA loan, said Jackie Haliburton, a Veterans Service Officer in Hoke County, North Carolina, home to part of the giant Fort Bragg military installation and one of the most underwater counties in the country.

“You will keep paying, no matter what, because you want to make sure you can hang on to that benefit,” Haliburton said.

These and other casualties of the real estate meltdown are easy to overlook as homes in much of the country are again fetching record prices.

 

But in Underwater America, homeowners face painful choices. To sell at current prices would mean accepting huge losses and laying out cash to pay off mortgage debt. Leasing these properties often won’t cover the owners’ monthly costs. Those who default will trash their credit scores for years to come.

DREAMS DEFERRED

Special education teacher Gail Payne noses her Toyota Rav 4 out of the driveway most workdays by 5 a.m. for the two-hour ride to her job in New York City’s Bronx borough.

“I hate the commute, I really, really do,” Payne said. “I’m tired.”

Now 66, she and husband Michael were counting on equity from the sale of their house to fund their retirement in Florida. For now, that remains a dream.

The Paynes’ gated community of Penn Estates, in East Stroudsburg, Pennsylvania, is among scores that sprang up in Monroe County during the housing boom.

Prices looked appealing to city dwellers suffering from urban sticker shock. But newcomers didn’t grasp how irrational things had become: At the peak, prices on some homes ballooned by more than 25 percent within months.

Slideshow (19 Images)

Today, homes that once fetched north of $300,000 now sell for as little as $72,000. But even at those prices, empty houses languish on the market. When the easy credit vanished, so did a huge pool of potential buyers.

Eight hundred miles to the west, in an unincorporated area of Boone County, Illinois, the Candlewick Lake Homeowners Association begins its monthly board meeting with the Pledge of Allegiance and a prayer.

Nearly 40 percent of the 9,800 homes with mortgages in this county about 80 miles northwest of Chicago are underwater, according to the ATTOM data. Some houses that went for $225,000 during the boom are now worth about $85,000, property records show.

By early 2010, unemployment topped 18 percent after a local auto assembly plant laid off hundreds of workers. At Candlewick Lake, so many people walked away from their homes that as many as a third of its houses were vacant, said Karl Johnson, chairman of the Boone County board of supervisors.

“It just got ugly, real ugly, and we are still battling to come back from it,” Johnson said.

While the local job market has recovered, signs of financial strain are still evident at Candlewick Lake.

The community’s roads are beat up. The entryway, meeting center and fence could all use a facelift, residents say. The lake has become a weed-choked “mess,” “a cesspool,” according to residents who spoke out at an association meeting earlier this year. Association manager Theresa Balk says a recent chemical treatment is helping.

 

“A gated community like this, with our rules and fees, it may be just less attractive now to the general public,” he said.

Source: Reuters.com – Reporting by Michelle Conlin and Robin Respaut; Editing by Marla Dickerson SEPTEMBER 14, 2018

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What property rights do I have if I’m in a common law relationship?

Property right in a common law relationship

When it comes to the division of property in Ontario after a common law relationship comes to an end, many people believe that they benefit from the same legal rights as any married couple, especially when children are involved.

It’s true to say that legal rights pertaining to children will be the same as if you were married, however, the biggest difference between married and unmarried couples is that you’re not automatically entitled to make any claim to the property you’ve shared and possibly contributed to, nor do you have an automatic right to live in the home that you have resided in.

Property right in a common law relationship

When am I entitled to make a claim on a property owned by my common law partner?

Firstly, you would need to be considered to be in a common law relationship according to the Family Law Act and then you would need to provide evidence to prove monetary or another contribution, such as your time, which significantly bettered the household and benefited your common law partner. You may also have a claim if you can establish that the manner in which you operated as a couple greatly prejudiced you while benefiting the other side; thereby entitling you to have an interest in their property.

How do I know if I’m in a common law relationship?

The rules around this vary from province to province but in Ontario, this usually comes down to the length of the relationship and whether any children are involved. If there are no children involved, you are required to have lived together for at least three years before being deemed to be in a common law relationship and where there are children from the relationship, this time may be reduced to one year, although every case is different.

How can I prove my contribution to the household?

This is where the division of property becomes more complex in a common law relationship scenario as the responsibility falls upon the non-owner of the property to provide evidence of their contribution.

Most people in this situation will need to consult a lawyer to represent them in court as it becomes a matter of contract law as opposed to family law. If you feel as though you’ve made a valuable contribution, monetary or otherwise, over the course of the relationship, there are essentially two claims that you might be able to bring to court; unjust enrichment and constructive trust, both of which have different factors that need to be proved for the judge to make an award.

Protecting your interests

Whether you’re in a relationship and about to move into a property owned by your partner or, already in this situation and concerned about protecting your interests, there are ways in which you can be proactive and feasibly avoid the need for court should the worst happen.

Cohabitation Agreements can be drawn up by an experienced family lawyer, outlining how property should be divided if the relationship were to break down. Although this might seem like an awkward conversation at the time, once you and your partner have come to an understanding about where you both stand, it’s much less stressful to address it at the start of a relationship than it is when things may have become strained. You can get a sample cohabitation agreement but you will each need your own lawyer to advise on what your legal rights and obligations are under it for it to be legally binding in Ontario.

If you’re already going through the process of separation from a common law partner, the other arrangement that you could make is a Separation Agreement. As long as the parties are able to agree, a well drafted agreement sets out how the property is to be divided and can again save on time and money in going to court, but it is also enforceable by court should the need arise (again, so long as each party has made full financial disclosure and had independent lawyers acting for them).

Need advice on your particular situation?

If you want to understand how to best protect your assets or you need some help determining what you might be entitled to, contact our team today to book your free consultation with a member of our Family Law team.

Epstein & Associates, Barristers and Solicitors – Posted on August 12, 2019

 

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Pharrell Williams is collaborating with developers on a new Toronto condo project

<img class=”aligncenter size-full wp-image-197263″ src=”https://d3exkutavo4sli.cloudfront.net/wp-content/uploads/2019/11/untitled_condo_pharrell.jpg” alt=”” width=”1200″ height=”1034″ />

Photo: Anthony Cohen

Grammy Award-winning artist, songwriter and producer Pharrell Williams is collaborating with developers on a new midtown Toronto condominium project.

Westdale Properties and Reserve Properties launched the marketing for their two-tower residential development, called untitled, today during a press event in Yonge-Dundas Square. Williams, who introduced the project via video on the screens across the public square, partnered with the developers on the design and creative elements of the condominium tower.

“This partnership has evolved from a desire to do something really unique for Toronto in architecture and design as a whole,” said Sheldon Fenton, president and CEO of Reserve Properties, at the launch. “We believe that by bringing in a cultural icon with vision and ideation, from outside the realm of real estate, it would allow us to break the mold in terms of what has been traditionally done.”

<img class=”aligncenter size-full wp-image-197266″ src=”https://d3exkutavo4sli.cloudfront.net/wp-content/uploads/2019/11/untitled_condos_pharrell.jpg” alt=”” width=”1200″ height=”1333″ />

Photo: Norm Li

Untitled is said to focus on key themes surrounding, “essentialism, connections to the elements and the universality of space,” according to a project press release. Williams desired to create an ethos of universality within the project, whereby “physical space is only a backdrop.” Drawing from these ideals, the project team landed on the name, untitled.

“We wanted to make sure that it continued to give you the message of this amazing vibration of being home, and once you get in it, you make it you,” said Williams via a recorded video, who could not be present for the launch in person. “It’s universally beautiful, but there’s enough space for you to get into it and make it yourself.”

 

Working with the project team, which also consists of Toronto-based architects IBI Group and local interior design firm U31, Williams played a role in crafting the vision and material aspects of untitled. His involvement ranged from consultation on the architectural and interior design, to choosing the furnishings in specific spaces. Williams is best known for his appearances as a judge on The Voice and his 2013 chart-topping single, “Happy.” Untitled marks his debut into multi-residential development.

“The opportunity to apply my ideas and viewpoint to the new medium of physical structures has been amazing,” wrote Williams in the release. “Everyone at the table had a collective willingness to be open, to be pushed, to be prodded and poked, to get to that uncomfortable place of question mark, and to find out what was on the other side. The result is untitled and I’m very grateful and appreciative to have been a part of the process.”

Source: Livabl.com –

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How to Choose an Out-of-State Market for Investment (in 3 Easy Steps!)

Aerial view of of a residential neighborhood in Hawthorne, in Los Angeles, CA
You’ve decided, for whatever reason, that you want to invest outside of your local area or state. Your next question is—where should I invest?

 

I’m going to offer you a list of things that you can consider when trying to figure out what market to invest in. These things are in no particular order, and some of them may not apply to you or your particular situation. My intention with each one is to give you something to think about and hopefully some ideas on where and how to start looking for a market that suits your investment needs.

Here we go!

Step #1: Narrow Down Your Market Options

First, if you are brand new to out-of-state investing and don’t have a clue where to start, your location choices are likely going to feel extremely overwhelming. I have two things for you to think about that will hopefully at least get you moving in some kind of direction.

Where do you have friends and family?

Are there any cities where you have friends or family who might be good assets to have on your “team” on the ground? I’m not necessarily saying go into business with your friends or family or make them an official part of the team. But if you already have ties to any particular cities, maybe take a little time to decide if any of those cities might be good ones to get started.

Even if your friends or family there aren’t part of your team, they may be able to occasionally drive by your property once you own it and tell you if anything crazy seems to be going on. It never hurts to have an extra set of trustworthy eyes on an investment property!

Where are other investors buying?

Thanks to technology and the internet (and websites like BiggerPockets!), you can easily and quickly network with other out-of-state investors. Ask people which markets they are buying in, and if they seem friendly and interested in chatting more, find out why they are buying in those markets.

Don’t struggle to reinvent the wheel when experienced investors are already out there succeeding with out-of-state properties. I did secretly throw a keyword in there—experienced. Don’t take just anyone’s word for what they claim to be a good city to invest in. But remember, you’re just trying to get a list started. You can dig into details later as you go along.

Start there. Make a list of the cities that come up when you consider those two things. Again, this isn’t your final list, but at least your list is much shorter now than it was when it had all 19,354 U.S. cities on it as investing options.

You may not have known you had a list of 19,354 cities on it, but if you were starting from scratch, the whole country was a possibility! That would have to be intimidating and overwhelming—and almost an impossible point to start from. Now you have a less intimidating starting point.

Related: What Moving Out of State is Teaching Me About Remotely Managing Rentals

Step #2: Analyze Those Markets

So, you are looking at your list of some number of cities or major markets, and now your question is—how do I know a good city to invest in from a bad city?

In my mind, there are only two major questions I ask to determine whether I want to invest in a particular city:

  • Do the numbers work?
  • How likely am I going to be able to sustain those numbers?

If you don’t know what numbers I’m talking about, I’m talking about your returns. Returns (aka profits) can be generated in two major ways: cash flow and appreciation. This is at least true for rental properties.

If you are flipping out of state, some of this will not apply to you, and there are some slightly different considerations that you’ll need to incorporate into your analyses. You’re on your own, though, for those—I’ve never flipped, so I definitely shouldn’t be the one to tell you how to rock that method out.

Most likely, if you are wanting to invest out of state, you’re probably doing so because you want cash flow. Most of the investors who invest out of state do so because the numbers locally don’t pencil out. This is often the case in a lot of the bigger markets—Los Angeles, San Francisco, New York, etc.

businesswoman doing paperwork at office desk, working through finances, using calculator and making notes in her notebook with pen

And while those markets don’t usually pencil out for cash flow, they are the bigger players when it comes to appreciation. So, in thinking of anyone who lives there and wants to buy out of state, it’s probably because they want cash flow. See my logic?

Either way, let’s assume you are going after cash-flowing rental properties out of state because you can’t find cash flow locally. If that’s the case, the numbers need to work in the market you choose to invest in. Otherwise, what’s the point?

So, let’s think about the numbers. What kind of numbers do you need to understand when it comes to cash flow?

If you are in it for cash flow, you want to be able to determine the projected cash flow on a property. To help you do that, use the easy formulas in this article: “Rental Property Numbers so Easy You Can Calculate Them on a Napkin.”

In addition to the equations in that article, a term you will want to be familiar with is “price-to-rent ratio.” This term compares the price of a property to how much rent it can collect. The reason these two things matter is because they will determine whether you can cash flow on the property or not.

As you saw in those cash flow equations, you need the rental income you collect on a property to surpass the expenses of buying and owning that property in order to have positive cash flow. If the expenses of buying and owning that property are higher than the rent you can collect from the property, you’re in a negative cash flow situation and losing money (on the cash flow front at least).

Knowing this term now, if someone asks you if you’re interested in a particular market for investing, your first question might be—how are the price-to-rent ratios there? What you’re ultimately asking here is—is there an option for cash flow in that particular city?

For instance, I can tell you that hands-down the price-to-rent ratios in Los Angeles are not supportive of cash flow. I can tell you that the price-to-rent ratios in Indianapolis are generally favorable for cash flow. In no way does that mean every property or every location within Indianapolis will cash flow, but it does mean there is an option for it—whereas in Los Angeles, there’s really no option for cash flow.

Now, let’s say a particular market has generally favorable price-to-rent ratios for cash flow.

Oh wait, I just heard you ask—how do I know if a market has favorable price-to-rent ratios? Great question.

The fastest way to find that out is to network with other investors. You can either ask other people where they are investing, which I already mentioned, or let’s say you have a family member in a particular city and you’re curious about whether or not you can cash flow there. Post in a BiggerPockets Forum and ask people if they have any knowledge of cash flow potential in said market.

Look for people investing there, and find out the best places for cash flow there. If all of that fails, start looking up properties and running those equations I taught you, and see if you’re coming out ahead on cash flow.

Let’s say a particular market has generally favorable price-to-rent ratios for cash flow. This is where that second question I asked comes in—how likely am I going to be able to sustain those numbers?

The answer to this question is lengthy, so I’ll just give you one basic thought to consider for now. Is the market you are looking at a growth market or a declining market? The reason this matters is because you can project cash flow numbers until the cows come home, but if certain factors come into play with your property, you may never see a single bit of that projected cash flow materialize.

Bad tenants, for example, can cause you to not see a penny of your projected flow because they can cost so much in expenses—IF they are even paying the rent.

For details on growth versus declining markets, check out “How to Know If Any Given Real Estate Market is Wise to Invest in (With Real Life Examples!).”

To help you understand the potential consequences of investing in a declining market, check out “5 Risks of Buying Rental Properties in Declining Markets.”

Step #3: Decide on a Market

Your list of potential markets should be even shorter now than it was when you narrowed it down from 19,354 cities to either cities you know people in or have ties to or cities other investors recommend. It should only include markets/cities where the numbers not only work but also where the numbers have good potential of sustaining themselves. (That last part is purely my own personal investment strategy preference—it’s certainly not a requirement.)

You may have one market on your list at this point, or you may have a handful. Which one you ultimately decide on may just come down to personal preference at this point—or it may depend on your situation and your resources.

At this point, here are a few more things you can look at.

Budget/Capital

You just might not have enough capital to invest in all of the good options out there. For instance, I know of some amazing deals in Baltimore and Philadelphia, but those particular deals require a minimum of $90,000 up front.

You may not have $90,000. You might only have $20,000. Well, good news—$20,000 can get you a great cash-flowing property in other cities!

So, for your budget, you may stay focused on one area over another. I used to work with triplexes in both Chicago and Philadelphia. At that time, you could get a good cash-flowing triplex in Philadelphia for $130,000. The triplexes in Chicago at the time were bigger and nicer, and they were around $270,000.

The cash flow on the Chicago properties was higher, of course, but not everyone’s budget would support buying one of those triplexes. But many of those people could get one of the Philadelphia properties. So, more than anything, your available capital may further limit you on where you can invest. This isn’t always the case, but it is a consideration.

Property Type

This is simply a personal preference factor. For example, some markets like Philadelphia and Baltimore tend to have properties with more of an urban feel. They are often more of the row house-type of structure. Not everyone likes the urban feel, and not everyone likes adjoined buildings.

The other option would be properties with a suburban feel that are free-standing. You can find lots of these in the Midwest. Additionally, some markets offer a lot of multifamily (MFR) options, and some markets only have single-family (SFR) options that will cash flow. So, if you prefer urban or suburban over another, and if you prefer SFR or MFR over another, those personal preferences will steer you toward particular cities and away from others.

Related: Forget the Demographics and Focus on Researching THIS Before Investing Out-of-Area

Look! You’re continuing to narrow down your list! Here’s how to further narrow it.

Returns vs. Risk

At the end of the day, some cities and property types will be more risky than others. Even if you are looking within stable growth markets and none of the areas you are looking in are majorly dangerous, some may have significantly better schools than others, etc.

Maybe one market is slightly more in a “gentrifying” stage than another more matured market. It’s always fine to take on a little more risk, but make sure the proposed returns are high enough to justify it. Or if you are more risk-adverse, you may choose to accept slightly lower returns in exchange for staying with a less risky market and property. That’s totally fine as well.

So, you want to have a feel for the returns versus the risk available to you in each potential market and weigh that against where you are on your own personal scale of desire. What’s more important to you: returns or playing it safer? That should help you further whittle down your list.

Ease of Commute

This one may be less significant than others, but it could play a role. If you have narrowed your list down to say, two markets, and those two markets are weighted pretty evenly against each other—which one is easier to get to? If a nonstop, not-too-lengthy flight is available to one and to get to the other would require a couple stops and a longer travel time (which would also probably be more expensive), go with the one you can get to easier!

Ultimately, the most important thing about whichever market you decide on is whether or not you will lose sleep over investing there. Maybe it’s because you can’t stomach your investment property being so far out of reach, maybe it’s because the market is a little riskier, maybe you hate single family homes and really wanted a multifamily. Whatever the situation, go with what will put a smile on your face (and hopefully some cash flow in your pocket).

marketing-strategy

Summary

A quick summary on the steps you can take to help you decide on a market:

Step 1: Narrow down your market options.

  • Where do you know people?
  • Where are other people investing?

Step 2: Analyze those market options to further narrow down your list.

  • Is it a good market to invest in?
  • Do the numbers work?
  • Will you be able to sustain the numbers?

Step 3: Choose what you like!

  • Decide on your personal preferences and see which markets fit those.

Then, once you have your market decided on, go shopping! Even if you only narrowed your list down to a couple of cities, that’s fine. Two cities is easier to shop in than 19,354.

And here’s one last tidbit for you. At the very end of it, no matter how or why you chose the market(s) you did, you need to confirm one last thing. Are you ready?

The last thing that matters is that you can form a good team in the market you choose.

If you can’t find good team members to help you with your property, go to another market. If you don’t have a solid team as an out-of-state investor, you’ll be up that famous creek without a paddle.

If you’ve narrowed your list down to a couple of cities you’d be willing to invest in, choose the one that offers the best team. If you’ve narrowed your list down to one city you want to invest in but then you can’t form a solid team of good people there, start over and choose a new market. You must have the team!

There you have it! Now go market shopping.

 

 

Source: BiggerPockets.com – By Ali Boone November 5, 2019

 

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Here’s Where You Can Buy a Home if You Make Less Than $50,000 a Year

 

The conversation around homeownership in Mississauga and surrounding cities has been a challenging one, especially as prices remain high across all housing types in the city and surrounding municipalities (in fact, the average 905 condo is selling for over $400,000 and has been for sometime now).

But while it’s frustrating for experts—and non-experts who entered the market years ago—to tell prospective homebuyers that they’ll have to move to find an affordable housing, some people might be interested to know that there are indeed still places in Canada that offer affordable homes for single buyers with more modest salaries.

And a recent Zoocasa report reveals where solo homeowners-to-be on a budget might be able to purchase a home.

“While having a dual-income household can greatly improve purchasing power and the ability to qualify for a mortgage, that’s not to say homeownership isn’t in the cards for single-income earning buyers. In fact, according to recent calculations by Zoocasa in celebration of Single Awareness Day (February 15), there are a number of markets where it’s possible to buy a home on one income – and even have money left over,” says Penelope Graham, managing editor, Zoocasa. 

Graham says that, to determine which markets were affordable, the average and benchmark home prices were sourced from regional real estate boards. It was then assumed the buyer would make a 20 per cent down payment and take out financing with a 3.29 per cent interest rate amortized over 30 years, to determine the minimum income required to qualify for a mortgage on the average home.

Those findings were then compared to median income data of “persons living alone who earned employment income” as reported by Statistics Canada.Buying Single - Income Gap - Age 25-64

  • Buying a Home Single - Age 25 to 34
  • Buying a Home Single - Age 35 to 44

Buying a Home Single - Age 45 to 54

So, where can solo buyers most easily afford a home?

Overall, single home buyers will see the best bang for their buck in Eastern Canada and the Prairie provinces, with Regina taking top spot out of 20 cities for greatest affordability.

There, a single buyer earning the median income of $58,823 would enjoy an income surplus of $20,025 on the average priced home of $284,424.

That’s followed by Saint John, where someone earning the median of $42,888 would see a surplus of $18,038 on a $181,576 home, and Edmonton, where earning $64,036 would net a $17,826 surplus on the average home price of $338,760.

MLS listings in Calgary, Lethbridge, Winnipeg, and Halifax also fall within the realm of affordability for single-income purchasers.

So, where are single buyers less likely to purchase a home? As expected, Zoocasa says the Greater Golden Horseshoe (which includes Toronto and the GTA), is out of most people’s budgets.

Graham says a buyer earning the median of $50,721 would fall a whopping $88,361 short on the average $1,019,600 for MLS listings in Vancouver. Toronto real estate listings are the second-least affordable with an average home price of $748,328; a buyer earning $55,221 would face an income gap of $46,858.

Victoria is the third least affordable with an average home price of $633,386, still $39,359 above what the relatively high median income of $86,400 could afford.

Other markets not considered affordable for single buyers include Guelph, Kitchener-Waterloo, London, Montreal, and Ottawa.

Naturally, the housing market is more difficult for single millennials to navigate.

Zoocasa says the research also compared how earnings ranged by age group per location, and which demographic enjoyed the greatest affordability when purchasing a home. Across every market, Gen Xers (35 – 44 and 45 – 54 age brackets) enjoy the greatest earnings and purchasing power, with 11 markets considered within affordable reach (compared to 10 markets across all age groups).

Millennials (aged 25 – 34) had the least earning power in each city, behind Boomers (aged 55 – 64).

Overall, single home buyers aged 35 – 44 purchasing a home in Regina enjoyed the greatest affordability of all, with an income surplus of $24,215. A millennial purchasing in Vancouver had the least, facing a gap of $92,774.

Check out the infographics below to see which Canadian housing markets are most affordable for single buyers, courtesy of Zoocasa.

  • Buying a Home Single - Age 55 to 64

Top 5 Most Affordable Housing Markets for Single Home Buyers


1 – Regina

Average home price: $284,44

Income required: $38,798

Actual median income: $58,823

Income surplus: $20,025


2 – Saint John

Average home price: $181,576

Income required: 24,769

Actual median income: $42,888

Income surplus: $18,038


3 – Edmonton

Average home price: $338,760

Income required: $46,210

Actual median income: $64,036

Income surplus: $17,826


4 – Saskatoon

Average home price: $290,736

Income required: $39,659

Actual median income: $55,758

Income surplus: $16,099


5 – St. John’s

Average home price: $295,211

Income required: $40,270

Actual median income: $51,964

Income surplus: $11,694


5 Least Affordable Housing Markets for Single Buyers

1 – Vancouver

Average home price: $1,019,600

Income required: $139,082

Actual median income: $50,721

Income gap: $88,361


2 – Toronto

Average home price: $748,328

Income required: $102,079

Actual median income: $55,221

Income gap: $46,858


3 – Victoria

Average home price: $633,386

Income required: $86,400

Actual median income: $47,041

Income gap: $39,359


4 – Abbotsford

Average home price: $590,900

Income required: $80,604

Actual median income: $46,714

Income gap: $33,890


5 – Hamilton-Burlington

Average home price: $550,058

Income required: $75,033

Actual median income: $51,253

Income gap: $23,778

Source: Insauga.com – by Ashley Newport on November 1, 2019
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How to protect homes in the event of divorce

As the cost of living soars, more couples are cohabitating, even getting married sooner. But, as Statistics Canada showed, there were 2.64 million divorced people living in Canada last year, and when you throw a family gift into the mix, things get hairy.

“Family gifts are a very complicated area of the law and there are two different ways of looking at it,” said Nathalie Boutet of Boutet Family Law & Mediation. “A gift received before marriage is treated as a pre-marriage asset. There’s a huge exception if that gift is the matrimonial home.”

In other words, pre-marital exclusions don’t apply to matrimonial homes—the reason for which is to rectify a historical transgression that saw women spend most of their time in the matrimonial home but have their name excluded from title, effectively leaving them no recourse upon divorce.

“Parents who want to give money to their child need to understand before marriage that if it goes into a matrimonial home, they end up sharing that with their spouse if there’s a separation,” said Boutet. “If the parents have a condo and they give it to their child who gets married, that becomes equal sharing with the spouse. A parent should understand that first and have a conversation with their child. Sometimes when a person owns a house, they ask the person to sign a marriage agreement as a way to get themselves out of that mess should it ever occur.”

Boutet recommends that in-laws-to-be have the dreaded conversation about signing an agreement that will protect them from relinquishing their asset in the even their child gets divorced.

“I often get called in when parents still own a home and let someone go live in it,” said Boutet. “Sometimes, for planning, have them sign a prenup, or a cohabitation agreement if they’re not going to get married. At the time they begin living together, sign the agreement in case they separate.”

Another interesting scenario divorced couples and their in-laws sometimes find themselves in pertains to cottage ownership. What happens if the couple is married for a period of time during which the cottage was renovated with contributions from the outgoing spouse?

“I have a case right now where the parents own a cottage and the family has been using it for upwards of 30 years, but their child is getting divorced and his wife wants to know what her rights are to recoup renovations,” said Boutet. “The husband’s parents had been very well-advised by their own lawyers and, because they paid for all the materials, the wife could not pinpoint any specific expense she paid out of her own pocket. It was determined that she had done a little here and there, and it offsets the cost of free accommodations she’s had over all the years—she didn’t pay for the land, heating, repairs, things of that nature. So she was entitled to nothing.”

Source: Real Estate Professional – by Neil Sharma 18 Sep 2019

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When is a good time to get into the market?

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When it comes to real estate, one of the most common questions is: when is the best time to buy? The typical response is the best time to buy was yesterday and the second best time is today. That response is a bit clichéd as many homebuyers have heard it before and it doesn’t provide any practical advice.

Buying a home will likely be the largest purchase people make in their lives which is why they want to be as informed as possible when making their decisions. It’s impossible to predict where the markets are headed, but there are some scenarios where it makes sense to get into the market.

Early in the year

Historically, real estate sales slowdown at the start of the year. This happens because many people aren’t exactly excited to go out in the winter to search for a new home. Although there’s usually less inventory available during this season, there’s an opportunity for buyers since sellers may be more motivated to negotiate on price to complete the sale.

When interest rates are low

Over the last couple of years, interest rates in Canada have been at near record lows. In 2018, when the Canadian economy was doing well, the Bank of Canada increased interest rates three times from 1% to the current rate of 1.75%. The economy has since cooled and a recent poll found that many economists expect rates to remain flat until the end of 2020.

In the first half of 2020, we’ve seen mortgage rates fluctuate both up and down. In early 2019, 30-year fixed mortgage interest rates rose to between 4.5% and 5.0%. However, right now, we’re seeing rates as low as 2.54% which can be very appealing to potential and current homeowners.

When your financial situation is optimal

Buying a home is a goal for many Canadians, but it’s easier to make that a reality if your financial situation is in good standing. Ideally, you should have a secure income, good credit score, no or limited debt, and a healthy down payment.

By having all of the above, lenders are more likely to approve you for a mortgage in the amount you’re looking for. That’s not to say that lenders will ignore potential homeowners who have debt or are on a single income, it just means that they may not be extended as much money.

When inventories are high

Real estate is cyclical and things can change fast. A seller’s market can quickly become a buyer’s market if a lot of homes are up for sale. Generally speaking, spring and summer are when listings are at their peak, but there’s also an increased amount of buyers so that doesn’t automatically mean buyers will get a deal.

The highest month for home-for-sale inventories is May, followed by April and June which lines up perfectly for potential homeowners who are looking to move in by Labour Day. If there are more homes for sale compared to buyers, then sellers will need to ensure their home is priced competitively so they can get it off the market.

When the economy is doing well

Although interest rates may rise when the economy is doing well, it may still be a good time to buy a home. Those looking to buy who have been pre-approved for a mortgage may not feel the effects of any increased rates and they may be able to take advantage of new market conditions.

With an increased economy, there may be more construction of new homes which means more inventory for potential homeowners to choose from. This scenario also helps current homeowners who are looking to move up on the property ladder since they’ll likely have an easier time selling their current home before buying a new one.

The pros and cons of buying real estate

The above factors are all good reasons to start looking for a home but note that homeownership isn’t for everyone. If you’re looking to enter the real estate market, it’s important to look at the pros and cons early so you know what you’re getting into.

Pros

  • As a homeowner, you can choose what to do with your home
  • Over time, you build equity in your home
  • You may be able to generate income from your home by renting it out (or a portion of it)
  • There are some tax benefits e.g. tax deductions on mortgage interest

Cons

  • As a homeowner, you’re responsible for all the maintenance and repairs
  • There’s limited flexibility if you need to relocate quickly
  • A huge part of your net worth is locked into your home which makes it difficult to diversify
  • There are additional expenses that renters don’t have such as property tax and repairs

As you can see, deciding on when is a good time to get into the real estate market depends on quite a few things. There’s never an ideal time, but you can look at the current market conditions as well as your own financial situation and then decide if you’re ready to become a homeowner.

 

Source: Equitable Bank – Joe Flor Director, National Sales


Equitable Bank is a major lender partner to the mortgage broker network and offers mortgage products to meet almost every client need. To find out more call us at 905-813-4354 or stop by our office for a chat.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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