Tag Archives: apartment rentals

Liberals look to ease affordability concerns with release of housing strategy

Liberals look to ease affordability concerns with release of housing strategy

The plan will put a heavy focus on housing supply building tens of thousands of affordable housing units over the next decade and repurposing other cash to maintain housing supplements.

There are expectations that the plan will also include a new portable benefit that low-income renters can carry with them through the market.

Those are just two of a number of anticipated measures aimed at making housing in Canada more affordable, particularly for the 1.7 million households that are forced to spend more of their disposable income than they should on housing.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau will be in Toronto to unveil the details of the plan, while Social Development Minister Jean-Yves Duclos travels to Vancouver to make a simultaneous announcement on the West Coast to mark National Housing Day.

Recently released census data found that 1.7 million households were in “core housing need” in 2016, meaning they spent more than one-third of their before-tax income on housing that may be substandard or doesn’t meet their needs.

Outside of Vancouver, the cities with the highest rates of core housing need were in Ontario. In Toronto, close to one in five households were financially stretched the highest rate of any city in the country.

The government hopes that building 80,000 new affordable rental units, along with billions more in spending over the next decade, will lift 500,000 of those families out of core housing need and help a further 500,000 avoid or get out of homelessness.

The details of how the spending will roll out are of keen interest to housing providers and cities. Municipal leaders have been meeting with federal officials this week to talk about the national housing strategy.

The Liberals laid the financial backbone for the plan in this year’s federal budget, promising $11.2 billion over a decade in new spending. About $5 billion of that money the Canada Mortgage and Housing Corp. is expected to turn into $15 billion by leveraging $10 billion in private investment.

Still, most of the money won’t be spent until after the next election in 2019, which concerns anti-poverty groups.

Those groups are planning demonstrations in multiple cities today, demanding the Liberals spend the full $11.2 billion before the next election.

Source: The Canadian Press

Liberals look to ease affordability concerns with release of housing strategy

Advertisements
Tagged , , , ,

Ontario’s potential rental housing crisis in 11 statistics

Ontario Rental Housing Crisis-compressed

Earlier this week, the Federation of Rental-housing Providers of Ontario (FRPO) published a major report prepared by Toronto-based real estate market data firm Urbanation on the state of the Ontario rental market with a focus on the province’s largest region, the GTA.

A number of the report’s key findings will come as no surprise to those who have recently searched for rental housing in the city and surrounding region. Demand for rentals has hit multi-decade highs, according to the report, “driven by robust economic and population growth, job creation for prime renter cohorts, and a decline in homeownership affordability.”

While the report makes some encouraging observations on expected increases to the rental supply, the housing advocate concludes that a significant supply shortfall will remain and likely worsen unless the pace of construction ramps up quickly to meet demand.

Without policy action, the FRPO expects Ontario renters, especially those in the GTA, will experience mounting challenges in finding suitable housing.

Here are 11 stats from the report that illustrate the difficult market conditions that the province’s renters face:

1. The vacancy rate for purpose-built rental buildings sat at a 15-year low at the end of 2016. It was 2.1 per cent in the province and 1.3 per cent in Toronto.

2. The vacancy rate for Toronto condos — many of which are purchased by investors and added to the city’s rental pool — was even lower at the end of last year, sitting at a seven-year low of 1 per cent.

3. Eighty-five per cent of purpose-built rentals in Ontario are over 35 years old. Upgrading this aging existing stock will require a significant investment from rental owners, possibly to the tune of $5 billion over the next 5 years, the report estimates.

4. When looking at the age distribution of renters, the 25 to 34 year old demographic made up 21 per cent of total renter households in Ontario, making this cohort the “prime renter age segment.” The 35-44, 45-54 and 65+ age segments each made up 19 per cent of the total. Over the next five years, however, the prime 25 to 34 year old segment will see “accelerated population increases” thus further increasing demand for rentals.

5. Immigration to the Greater Toronto Area represented 30 per cent of Canada’s immigration total. Ninety thousand immigrants came to the region in 2016 and a similar number are expected to arrive in 2017. As the report notes, the majority of recent immigrants rent when they arrive.

6. After hitting a five-decade high in 2011, the homeownership rate in Ontario is expected to “flatten or decline in the next 10 years.” Affordability issues, higher interest rates and stricter mortgage policies are all expected to contribute to this trend.

7. By mid-2017, the cost disparity between owning and renting in the GTA remained at its highest level in more than five years.

8. On the rental supply side, purpose-built rental development reached its highest level since the 80s in both Ontario and the GTA. However, after the new rent control measures were unveiled as part of the province’s Fair Housing Plan, the rate at which new purpose-built rental buildings were proposed slowed when compared to previous quarters, with some projects originally proposed as rental even indicating a change to condominium.

9. On the rental demand side, the report forecasts that rental demand will outweigh supply by approximately 57,500 units over a 10-year period, or 5,750 units per year. This unit total “does not necessarily represent the level of additional rental development required to bring the market into a state of balance, but rather represents a level that keeps conditions from worsening over time.”

10. There is only one rental unit under construction per 1,000 GTA residents. In Vancouver, the ratio is over three rental units while in Montreal, it’s two units.

11. According to the report, rental starts need to double immediately and eventually triple from current levels just to satisfy demand.

Ontario Rental Housing Crisis-compressed

Source: Buzz Buzz News Canada –  

Tagged , , , , , , ,

The average cost of rent in major Canadian cities in September (MAP)

 

Although there has been a little fluctuation in prices, the ultra-hot Canadian rental market continues to increase across the board.

While some city’s prices for one-bedroom rentals remained unchanged since last month, the most expensive in Canada has now surpassed $2000, according to the latest report by PadMapper.

Not surprisingly, Vancouver and Toronto continue their domination as the top two cities with the most expensive rental markets in Canada.

Last month, Vancouver’s median rent for one-bedroom showed a decline of 4.8%. But one month can change a lot in this market, and the price of a Vancouver one-bedroom has jumped up 1.5% from last month bringing it to $2,020. Two bedrooms have also gone up in the city, and are now renting at $3,160.

In Toronto, rent continues to increase every month as the city saw a 4.3% hike in one bedroom rentals, which are now $1,930. Two bedrooms also increased to $2,440. The most shocking part about rental costs in this hot city is that one-bedrooms in Toronto are up 15.6% since this time last year. Let that sink in for a minute. Actually don’t, time is money…

PadMapper

Trailing behind Toronto is Barrie, which also experienced a massive 15.4% annual growth rate over the past year. One and two bedrooms have settled this month with medians of $1,200 and $1,450, respectively, in the Ontario city.

Meanwhile, Montreal remained in fourth place. Rent in the popular Quebec city has experienced a 3.5% hike to $1,190, with two bedrooms now renting at $1,520.

Back to the west coast, where Victoria remains in fifth place with its median one bedroom costs increasing by 4.5% to $1,150, and two bedrooms growing slightly higher than last month to $1,490.

The largest drop in rental in Canada was in Quebec City, where one bedrooms dipped to $810, and two bedrooms went down 5% to $1,130.

But in Ontario, Hamilton climbed up three spots on the list to become the 11th most expensive rental market in Canada. This city’s growth rate for one bedroom units is up 5.3% to $1,000, and two bedroom rent grew 2.6% to $1,200.

Calgary remains steady, as one bedrooms are $1,020 just like last month, and two bedrooms also remain unchanged at $1,300.

The cheapest city to rent on the list is still Quebec’s Saguenay, which jumped a little to $640 for a one-bedroom, and $730 for a two bedroom. It’s probably one of the only cities in Canada where you never have to think about having a roommate these days.

PadMapper

See also
Tagged , ,

8 Things You Should Always Do Before Signing A Lease

things to do while apartment hunting

Make sure you know the full picture before you move in with all your stuff.

Finding the perfect rental can be a challenging process— scouring listings, cramming multiple viewings into a single day, and feeling like your ideal place is a needle in a haystack. So it’s understandable to quickly pull the trigger when you find that dream home in the perfect neighborhood with a reasonable monthly rent.

But before you sign on the dotted line for the keys to that perfect apartment for rent in Dallas, TX, there are some things to keep in mind. Pay attention to these 8 details, and you’re bound to be a happy camper once you’re all moved in.

8 Steps All Renters Should Take Before Signing a Lease:

  1. Read the entire lease

    Reading your entire lease will help prevent simple problems from popping up. But you can take this one step further and make sure you’re signing the right lease for your city or state. Ordinances vary by city and state, so be sure to call your local government to find out local regulations for landlord-tenant law. Fortunately, there are nonprofit renters’ rights organizations in most major cities, so a quick phone call can help make sure you’re on the right track.

  2. Remember: It’s a partnership

    The landlord-tenant relationship can be friendly, especially if it gets off to a good start. Present yourself well on viewing day and be as polite and professional as you would be for a job interview. They are probably showing the property to many prospective tenants — and you want to stand out in all the right ways. Also remember that as much as your landlord is trusting you with their property, you are trusting them to maintain a safe and healthy living environment. Don’t be afraid to ask questions or request repairs and note the response. If they’re not willing to hear your concerns or write repairs into the lease, it could foretell problems down the road.

  3. Visit the apartment at different times of day

    Maybe the master bedroom gets gorgeous morning sunlight — but also sits right under a street lamp, throwing off even the best sleeper’s circadian rhythms. (Potential solution: blackout shades!) Visiting a unit more than once and at different hours will help you get a better sense of the space, from changing noise levels to noting the best hours for soaking up the rays. And while it’s not possible to stretch out your visits over multiple seasons, it’s always a good idea to ask the landlord about the apartment under different weather conditions. He or she may be able to prepare you for a loud radiator come winter or give you the scoop on a lifesaving cross-breeze during the summer months.

  4. Ask about alterations (no matter how small)

    Most lease agreements will specify what changes you’re allowed to make to an apartment, but it’s always a good idea, before signing, to get specific. Whether you’re hoping to install patio stones in the backyard or just put some nails in the wall, be sure to bring up those enhancements at the first viewing. Landlords can differ greatly in what customization they will allow; taking it for granted that you can “make your rental home your own” could put your security deposit at risk. And if there are things you feel compromise the safety or integrity of the apartment, have your landlord agree — in writing — to make those repairs.

  5. Understand the rules for subletting

    Subletting can be a great option for renters who might need to move out early. Maybe you’re renting while planning to buy, and your dream home comes along mid-lease, or a job unexpectedly takes you to a new state. Subletting can help you avoid breaking your lease by letting someone else pay out the remaining months — but make sure your landlord allows it or would consider an exception to the rule. Penalties for subletting can range from a hefty fine to eviction, so best to be in the clear before passing off the keys to another renter.

  6. Ask what’s included (and be clear on what isn’t)

    Utilities and other hidden costs can add up if they’re not included in the monthly rent. Even if you determine that the basics like gas and electric come with the rental, be sure to ask about hidden fees like garbage pickup, on-site parking, or monthly pet fees. Or if the property hosts an on-site gym or free laundry, factor those savings into your household budget. If no utilities are included, try to get a ballpark idea of what they might cost and budget accordingly. Asking a neighbor or the previous tenant can help give you an idea of what others spend.

  7. Talk to your new neighbors

    Get to know your neighbors, even before you sign. If they’re in the same building, you can get an expert opinion on the ins and outs of your prospective rental. They can let you know what utilities usually cost, weigh in on the dependability of your landlord or property management company, and tell you what to expect from the neighborhood. Ask how long they’ve lived in their apartment: It’s a good sign if your neighbor has found reason to renew their yearly lease. Neighbors can be good for so much more than a borrowed cup of sugar!

  8. Have your papers in order

    Competitive rental markets like New York, NY, and San Francisco, CA, often see many qualified candidates vying for the same apartment. In these cases, the most crucial thing you can do before signing a lease is to be 100% prepared. Having your paperwork ready to go with your application will expedite the process and increase your chances of signing that lease.

Is there anything you wish you’d asked a landlord before signing on the dotted line?

 

Source: Trulia.com – By Christine Stulik | Apr 12, 2017

Tagged , , , ,

Liberal budget released: These are the housing related promises

Liberal budget released: These are the housing related promises

Cities and affordable housing providers will find themselves with $11.2 billion more to spend on new and existing units over the coming decade, as part of the federal government’s multi-pronged push to help people find homes.

Of that money, which comes from the government’s social infrastructure fund, $5 billion will be allotted to encourage housing providers to pool resources with private partners and to allow the Canada Mortgage and Housing Corp., to provide more direct loans to cities.

The funding falls short of the $12.6 billion the mayors of Canada’s biggest cities requested last year and Wednesday’s federal budget shows that the majority of the $11.2 billion isn’t slated to be spent until after 2022.

Over the next 11 years, the Liberals pledged $202 million to free up more federal land for affordable housing projects, $300 million for housing in the North and $225 million to support programs that provide units to indigenous peoples off reserve.

The money, coupled with $2.1 billion for homelessness initiatives over the next 11 years, sets the financial backbone for the Liberals’ promised national housing strategy that will be released in the coming months. The document will outline how the government plans to help people find affordable housing that meets their needs, and ensure a robust emergency shelter and transitional housing system for those who need it.

Finance Minister Bill Morneau told reporters the spending will make a difference for those who rely on social housing. He said the Liberals want to ensure cities can access funds as quickly as possible to make necessary investments in the country’s stock of aging affordable housing.

Liberal budget released: These are the housing related promises

The details are among many laid out in the budget, which outlines how the government plans to spend the $81 billion it is making available between now and 2028 to address future infrastructure needs and, the government hopes, boost the economy to create new jobs and government revenues.

It also gives $39.9 million over five years for Statistics Canada to create a national database of every property in Canada. This will include up-to-date information on sales, the degree of foreign ownership and homeowner demographics and finances to answer lingering questions about the skyrocketing cost of housing that may squeeze middle-class buyers out of the market.

The Liberals clearly see a need to attract private investors to help pay for infrastructure projects, including affordable housing, given the federal government’s tight fiscal position.

At the centre of that push is a proposed new infrastructure bank that would use public dollars to leverage private investment in three key areas: trade corridors, green infrastructure and public transit.

The government is setting aside $15 billion in cash for the bank, split evenly between each of the aforementioned funding streams, with spending set to start as early as the next fiscal year on projects based on budget projections.

Morneau said that the government wants to have the bank up and running this year, including having some projects that will be identified for investors.

But the budget document again projects that the majority of the bank’s spending won’t happen until after 2022. And in the case of trade corridor infrastructure, spending isn’t expected to start until 2020, even though some experts argue this stream would give the country the biggest economic bump.

The Liberals are also tweaking how much of the bill it will cover for municipal projects under the second phase of its infrastructure plan in order to nudge provinces to pony up more money for work and to prod cities to consider using the bank for projects that could generate revenue, like transit systems.

The government will cover up to 40 per cent of municipal projects under the upcoming phase of its infrastructure plan, 50 per cent for provincial projects and 75 per cent for indigenous projects.

Source:  The Canadian Press 22 Mar 2017

Tagged , , , , , ,

Toronto explores laneway homes as a solution to the housing crunch

Laneway homes could be a solution to Toronto's housing crisis, advocates say. The city is holding public consultations about this.

Laneway homes could be a solution to Toronto’s housing crisis, advocates say. The city is holding public consultations about this. (CBC News)

The solution to Toronto’s housing affordability crisis could be found in your own backyard.

In response to skyrocketing home prices, the city’s looking to loosen the bylaws around developing one of its few sources of underused land: laneways.

A proposal went to public consultation Monday, exploring the possibility of letting homeowners build a secondary suite on the edge of a property leading into a laneway.

But don’t call your realtor just yet.

Those smaller homes wouldn’t be for sale, said Alex Sharpe, one of the co-founders of the policy groups co-ordinating the public discussion.

“It’s not going to create a whole new crop of cheap houses that people can buy,” said Sharpe, who lives in one of the city’s few legal laneway homes and runs a group called Lanescape.

Laneway Toronto house

Alex Sharpe lives in a laneway home in Toronto and is the co-founder of Lanescape, which looks at the development of laneways. (CBC News)

Instead, it would build on the idea of a basement apartment. A laneway home would have more natural light, but unlike a basement apartment there would be more privacy because the backyard acts as a buffer between the main home and secondary suite, Sharpe said.

In theory, the move could benefit both Toronto’s renters and homeowners.

For property owners, it translates into an extra unit to cover the mortgage and house adult children or relatives. But it’s also a way to cool down the long-term rental market, which has seen supply shrink alongside the rise of AirBNB, studies have found.

“We view laneways as an opportunity to expand the supply of units in existing residential neighbourhoods,” Sharpe said. “They have the services, [they] have the infrastructure, the transit and they’re well-connected.

Media placeholder

Play Media

Toronto laneway home owner1:06

“We’ve had a shortage of housing in Toronto in the last number of years and it’s growing in intensity because we’ve run out of land.”

Tiny home fever

Laneway homes may be new to Toronto, but Vancouver’s city council gave landowners the green light to start building them in 2009. Regina and Ottawa have also followed suit.

In fact, Vancouver actually provides a how-to guide to residents that includes potential floor plans for the tiny homes.

Toronto city councillors Ana Bailao and Mary-Margaret McMahon say laneways could be critical to the future of the city’s development.

Laneway Toronto

Sharpe lives in a laneway home with two bedrooms and a streamlined design. (CBC News)

McMahon represents Ward 32, Beaches-East York, where she said there’s a concern about the effect that high-rises would have on streetscapes.

“So this is a very measured approach to density,” she said of the laneway discussions. “We have concerns about privacy creep and what-not so you’re not going to see the Taj Mahal of four-storey laneway home; it’s going to be in keeping with the character of the neighbourhoods.”

Laneways rejected before

Toronto city staff cited privacy concerns — that secondary homes might overlook their neighbour’s backyards or cast shadows — among their reasons in a 2006 report that recommended against allowing laneway housing.

Uncertainty about how to deliver public services like garbage pick-up, barriers to emergency access and the possibility that residential properties would be subdivided also killed the idea from going ahead at the time.

Ana Bailao

Coun. Ana Bailao says that laneway homes are no different than allowing a property owner to rent out a basement suite. (CBC News)

But the current plan at the public debate would see all public services delivered from the front of the property, in the same way that it’s done for rental suites, Coun. Bailao said.

“We already have basement apartments in the city of Toronto,” said the Ward 18, Davenport councillor. “All we’re saying is maybe we should allow it at the back of the houses as well.”

Consultations are also happening within the planning departments about those changes and there’s a push to name the city’s laneways so that first responders would be able to navigate them more easily, she said.

Province supports laneways

And, unlike in 2006, laneway advocates now have the support of Ontario law.

The province made changes to its Planning Act in 2011, when it introduced new legislation that requires municipalities to “establish official plan policies and zoning bylaw provisions” for secondary units — including those for laneways.

“The policy at the province level is disjointed from the local level,” Sharpe said, something he said he hopes the public consultations will change.

Tagged , , , , , ,

What it’s like to live in women’s-only housing in NYC

You get a housekeeper, but you can’t bring boys over

Though apartment buildings designed for professional women—think the Barbizon Hotel on the Upper East Side, or the Martha Washington Hotel on Park Avenue—are largely a thing of the past, some of these women-only enclaves still exist in Manhattan. One of these is the Webster Apartments on West 34th Street, and the New York Times is ON IT.

Specifically, they recently ran a profile of a 24-year-old resident of the building who ticks basically all the boxes you’d expect from someone who lives in what is basically a glorified dorm. She’s a recent New York City transplant (check) who works in fashion (check) and doesn’t mind the living situation because she lived in sorority houses in college (check). Her room, which measures just 13 feet by 8 feet, is decorated with twinkly lights (check), a copy of The Devil Wears Prada (check check), and a poster of Audrey Hepburn in Breakfast at Tiffany’s (checkcheckcheck). “I had to live in Manhattan,” she told the Times. “I was so excited when I went to get my license and it said New York, New York.” (Oh, honey.)

But what’s really interesting to us, as professional real estate gawkers, are the specifics of this particular living arrangement, which isn’t so different from the ones offered at trendy “co-living” situations like WeLive or Common—but without the cool start-up factor, and with far more stringent rules.

Residents at the Webster Apartments get their own rooms, but have shared bathrooms—five or six to a floor, to accommodate 25 to 30 women (each room also has its own private sink). According to the Times, rents in the building go from $1,000 to $1,800, and are determined by a sliding scale “pegged to the resident’s income.” Residents must also be employed, “at least 35 hours a week or have an internship or fellowship of at least 28 hours a week,” with a yearly between $30,000 to $85,000.

What do you get for that price? Actually, quite a lot: Housekeeping, two meals a day, plenty of common spaces (including a TV room and a library), and per the Times, “social events, most with an educational or professional bent”—resume workshops, mixers, and the like. (The resident they profiled mentions a painting workshop, but there are also yoga classes and movie nights, among other things.)

When you compare the cost of living there to something like WeLive—where a studio will soon cost $3,050 (albeit with a private bathroom)—it may seem like a pretty decent deal, particularly if you’re new to the city or not inclined to live with strangers. There is still a rule that men aren’t allowed into rooms—and given that these sorts of boardinghouses came from a general fear of women’s well-being in early-20th-century New York City, it’s not surprising that it exists, though that doesn’t make it any less weird in modern-day New York City. (Though the building apparently has “beau rooms” that are “uniquely decorated recalling ‘Legends and Lotharios.’” where you can take a, well, beaus.)

But the Webster’s website notes that it’s been filled to capacity since it opened in 1923, so clearly there’s a demand for this sort of housing—even if the audience for it is limited. And the resident the Times spoke with, at least, is happy with her situation—especially considering it’s temporary, since the Webster has a five-year limit for residents. “Even when my mom came to visit me last month and stayed on a cot in my room, she was like, ‘I don’t want to go back home!’” Isn’t that sweet.

 

Source: Curbed New York – BY DEC 9, 2016

Tagged , , , , ,