Tag Archives: building code

Ontario’s 16 new housing measures

Houses are seen in a suburb located north of Toronto in Vaughan, Canada, June 29, 2015.

The Ontario government has announced what it calls a comprehensive housing package aimed at cooling a red-hot real estate market on Thursday. Here are the 16 proposed measures:

  • A 15-per-cent non-resident speculation tax to be imposed on buyers in the Greater Golden Horseshoe area who are not citizens, permanent residents or Canadian corporations.
  • Expanded rent control that will apply to all private rental units in Ontario, including those built after 1991, which are currently excluded.
  • Updates to the Residential Tenancies Act to include a standard lease agreement, tighter provisions for “landlord’s own use” evictions, and technical changes to the Landlord-Tenant Board meant to make the process fairer, as well as other changes.
  • A program to leverage the value of surplus provincial land assets across the province to develop a mix of market-price housing and affordable housing.
  • Legislation that would allow Toronto and possibly other municipalities to introduce a vacant homes property tax in an effort to encourage property owners to sell unoccupied units or rent them out.
  • A plan to ensure property tax for new apartment buildings is charged at a similar rate as other residential properties.
  • A five-year, $125-million program aimed at encouraging the construction of new rental apartment buildings by rebating a portion of development charges.
  • More flexibility for municipalities when it comes to using property tax tools to encourage development.
  • The creation of a new Housing Supply Team with dedicated provincial employees to identify barriers to specific housing development projects and work with developers and municipalities to find solutions.
  • An effort to understand and tackle practices that may be contributing to tax avoidance and excessive speculation in the housing market.
  • A review of the rules real estate agents are required to follow to ensure that consumers are fairly represented in real estate transactions.
  • The launch of a housing advisory group which will meet quarterly to provide the government with ongoing advice about the state of the housing market and discuss the impact of the measures and any additional steps that are needed
  • Education for consumers on their rights, particularly on the issue of one real estate professional representing more than one party in a real estate transaction.
  • A partnership with the Canada Revenue Agency to explore more comprehensive reporting requirements so that correct federal and provincial taxes, including income and sales taxes, are paid on purchases and sales of real estate in Ontario.
  • Set timelines for elevator repairs to be established in consultation with the sector and the Technical Standards & Safety Authority.
  • Provisions that would require municipalities to consider the appropriate range of unit sizes in higher density residential buildings to accommodate a diverse range of household sizes and incomes, among other things.

Source: The Canadian Press – April 20, 2017

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Mike Holmes: Speaking in code

Before starting any job, it’s important to check code to ensure you’re using the proper materials and practices so that when the project is finished, it will pass inspection. By now, you all know that I like to build above minimum code whenever possible — and by doing so, we’ll have stronger buildings that are built using better products and practices.

In fact, because building codes are different depending on where you live, the best way for me to teach others is to leave minimum code at the curb and focus on teaching homeowners how to build better and stronger homes in the first place.

Here’s a question I’m asked often: When it comes to fasteners, what do I use? While there’s not one fastener for all occasions, when it comes to screws or nails, I’m going to use screws wherever possible.

The right fastener for the job

When it comes to fastening, I always say to glue it and screw it. Gluing gives you a solid connection while the screws will keep it there — and not loosen over time. Find the right fastener for the job by checking code first.

There are some projects where you need the right kind of screws, and other jobs where screws on their own just won’t cut it.

Wood screws are used to secure lumber, but the kind of job you’re doing will dictate what kind of screws to use. There are screws that are designed for interior or exterior projects.

In the case of exterior wood screws, you can get them specifically designed for the type of wood you’re using, like cedar, or a pressure-treated wood. Pressure-treated wood is treated with Alkaline Copper Quaternary (ACQ), which is more corrosive for metal. That means you need a fastener that is approved for outdoor use with ACQ treatment in mind.

For indoor projects, drywall screws are designed to hold drywall securely in place because they have deeper threads than a typical screw, which keeps them from dislodging from the wall.

Screws popping out of drywall

Have you ever had your screws pop right out of your drywall? There are a few reasons why this could be happening — but it usually comes down to an issue with the installation. A lot of installations are done too quickly. If you’ve only got one guy installing the drywall as fast as possible they might not be putting proper pressure on the sheet of drywall making sure it’s on tight.

Too many builders worry about speed, without taking the time to truly do the job right.

In the case of minor popping there’s a relatively simple fix. Push the drywall in and ensure it is snug against the stud, and add some new screws. From there, mud over the screws, sand it, and add a fresh coat of paint.

Squeaky floors

If you’ve ever tried to quietly sneak around your house only to be given away by the telltale sound of a squeaky floor — the problem may actually lie in your subfloor, and how the builder fastened the sheathing to the floor joists. You can sheath a subfloor with hardwood but you will find that it contracts and expands depending on the humidity conditions in the home.

Because the hardwood is nailed to the subfloor, in time, as the wood contracts, the nails can pop out.

To keep things quiet and in place, use a plywood subfloor that’s been properly glued down and secured with screws. The glue makes the connection between the sheathing and the subfloor, and the screws hold everything in place without loosening over time.

Builders often use a nail gun to install subfloors, and you sometimes have the nail missing the joist. When not completely secured, the floors will move when pressure is placed on them (every time someone walks on them), causing that annoying squeak you hear.

Before you decide on fasteners for your next project, always check what code dictates in your area. The spec of the job will let you know what kind of fastener you should be using. If it’s my choice — I’m going to glue it and screw it.

Building a strong house that will stand up to anything you can throw at it is all a matter of building it right and choosing the right materials.

Watch Mike Holmes in his series, Holmes Makes It Right, on HGTV. For more information, visit makeitright.ca.

Source: National Post – Mike Holmes | April 1, 2017

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