Tag Archives: condos

9 tips for buying profitable investment condos in Toronto

Photo: Jenny Henderson

Real estate is not a one-size-fits-all strategy. Pierre Carapetian, a top 1 percent agent in Toronto and an avid real estate investor himself, shares what we should know about buying an investment property in Toronto. Here are his tips to profitable purchases.

1. Understand your goals

The type of product you invest in will depend on your goals as an investor. Are you investing for equity gains or are you looking for an investment that generates cash flow?

Cash Flow

Toronto’s lucrative condo market and rising interest rates have raised carrying costs, making it more challenging to find cash-flow positive properties. There are, however, strategic ways to improve your margins, like a higher downpayment or purchasing the right product. Your Realtor will know best.

Type of property to invest in: Resale

Equity Gains

If it’s equity gains you’re after, you’ll need to think long-term. Toronto condos are a great option as prices in the core have been stable and rising substantially. An experienced Realtor can help guide you to the right product and the right neighbourhood so that you can achieve higher equity gains.

Type of property to invest in: resale or pre-construction

2. Know your budget and closing costs

Ensure you know how much cash you will need and how much mortgage you can afford to carry. This will influence the types of properties to evaluate when investing. If this is your principal residence you are allowed to purchase with as little as 5 percent down. However, as an investor purchasing a secondary property you must have at least 20 percent down.

5 Percent vs. 20 Percent Downpayment

Different products have different downpayment structures:

Type of property to invest in with < 20 percent downpayment: resale
Type of property to invest in with 20 percent + downpayment: resale or pre-construction

Closing Expenses

Beyond your downpayment, you’ll also need to account for closing expenses. These include Land Transfer Taxes and, on pre-construction condos specifically, HST (capped at $24,000).

Use this Land Transfer Tax Calculator to find out how much you’ll owe. First-time buyers are also eligible for a partial Land Transfer Tax rebate.

When investing in a pre-construction condo, you’ll need to pay HST on the registration date (approximately four years after purchase) to a maximum of $24,000. With a one year lease in place though, this amount is fully refundable as you’re able to file for a full HST rebate.

3. Understanding price per square foot averages in the neighbourhood

Paying attention to the price per square foot is a great indicator of an investment’s profit potential. Look for properties that have a low price per square foot compared to a comparable unit trading in that same neighbourhood. This will also help you determine if the best deal is pre-construction or resale.

“If the average resale condo in King West is trading for $900 per square foot and the current pre-construction deal is selling for $1,100 per square foot, you’re likely going to generate higher returns investing in resale,” says Pierre.

Photo: Jenny Henderson

4. Know how to spot a good deal

Beyond the price per square foot, there are many other factors to consider when spotting a profitable investment condo. Some of these include:

  • Does the builder have a good reputation?
  • Does the location or floorplan allow you to rent for a premium?
  • Is there future infrastructure development coming to the area?

We aren’t all real estate whisperers — if you don’t know how to spot a good deal, or maybe don’t have the time, hire an experienced Realtor to help you.

“I’m always scouring the market for profitable purchases that I can send along to my investor clients.”

5. Purchase investments where you can charge a premium in rent

There are key factors to look for as you search that will help guide you to a profitable investment property.

Rental prices favour condos along major transit/subway lines. You can also typically charge about the same rent for a two-bed, two-bath, 750-square-foot condo as you would a two-bed, two-bath 800-square-foot condo if they are in the same building. That 750-square-foot condo, however, will cost less to purchase, so you actually will improve your margins and lower your carrying costs.

6. Buy in gentrifying neighbourhoods

When it comes to equity gains, the biggest wins to be had are in pre-construction properties in up-and-coming neighbourhoods. If you can invest in areas when prices are low, you’ll reap the benefits in years to come as the area becomes more desirable.

Leslieville is a great example of how gentrification impacts property values. Condo prices there have increased 50 percent since 2014.* Investment opportunities in up-and-coming neighbourhoods where rental inventory is low will also allow you to charge a premium in rent.

PRO-TIP: Be on the look-out for investment opportunities on the Danforth along the subway line.

7. When purchasing, think long-term

When it comes to investing, it’s always wise to think long-term. The longer you hold your investment, the more equity you amass. As your investment’s market value goes up and your mortgage goes down, you’re able to leverage that equity into other investment condos. Learn about Pierre’s leveraging strategy and building a real estate portfolio.

PRO-TIP: Borrowing to invest can dramatically improve ROI.

8. Understand the tax implications

Knowing how your investment will affect your taxes — and the amount you owe — can make all the difference when purchasing property.

Capital Gains

When you sell your investment property, you are required to pay Capital Gains Tax. This means that 50 percent of your net profit will become taxable income. You are entitled to deduct expenses incurred during the investment from these gains (like interest on a loan and cash-flow losses).

HST

As we mentioned earlier, when investing in a pre-construction condo you’ll need to pay HST to a maximum of $24,000 when the building registers with the city (typically four years after your initial purchase). Your lawyer can file for a full HST rebate, refunded approximately four to six weeks later, provided you have a one year lease in place.

If you do not rent out your property for the minimum one year, you are not eligible for the HST rebate.

9. Ensure you’re playing by the rules

Ensure you play by the rules when investing. This includes understanding the rules regarding short-term rentals (eg. Airbnb) in the building to flipping condos and the financial consequences that come with it.

If you sell your investment too quickly you run the risk of being taxed as a trader rather than as an investor, which means you can be taxed on 100 percent of your profits as it’s seen as business income. It is best to get legal and property advice from your lawyer and/or accountant regarding tax implications as a flipper.

When it comes to spotting profitable investment opportunities in Toronto, just remember: it’s not about buying something, it’s about buying the right thing. Equipped with these nine investment tips, you can rest assured you’ve invested with sound advice and guidance from one of Toronto’s top real estate brokers.

You can read more on Pierre’s investment strategies here.

*Based on E01’s average condo price for 2018 compared to 2014

 

Source: Livabl.com – Feb 11, 2019

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How to ‘plan, invest and retire wealthy’

What if condo investing were as easy as owning a mutual fund? Well, it can be.

Connect Asset Management will be at the Investor Forum on March 2 to explain how it helps its clients turn one property into several and build portfolios that cash flow millions of dollars. One of the ways in which Connect Asset Management does that is by helping investor clients access to some of the most exclusive real estate developments in Ontario.

“We help investors plan, invest and retire wealthy with cash flow in condos,” said real estate broker and founder of Connect Asset Management Ryan Coyle. “It’s completely hands-off for our clients; we make investing in real estate as easy as owning a mutual fund.”

Connect Asset Management builds a strategy for its clients predicated on timing—that is, strategically choosing when to purchase a property.

“From acquisition to completion, there’s a tremendous amount of growth on capital appreciation and rental appreciation, so when the condo is built they have all this appreciation that gives them the ability to refinance, pull out the equity and buy more property,” said Coyle. “We help our clients identify the optimal time to flow that capital into more properties.”

The strategy, which Connect Asset Management will decode at the Investor Forum, is called the Multiplier Effect: The ability to use equity in a safe, not to mention lucrative, way. Coyle says that, with the right strategy, anyone can become a millionaire through investing in real estate.

For starters, ever wonder why the best units in key developments are gone well before sales open to the public?

“We’ve been a top-producing team for many years now and what that means for us is we get to access all the best developments, and we get our clients first access to all the developments before they open to general public and, quite frankly, before anyone even knows about them,” continued Coyle. “This way, our clients are able to get the best deals on the best units.”

Condominiums are far from Connect Asset Management’s sole investment strategy. The firm identifies key markets where yields remunerate clients well, and some of them include university towns with high enrollment but meagre student lodgings.

“Student housing is often referred to as ‘recession-free real estate,’ meaning that when recessions hit student housing tends to be among the strongest real estate because more people go back to school and that increases the demand on both the rental and resale side. The areas we invest in are seeing some of the highest enrollment rates in the country, and Canadian schools have a shortage of on-campus housing, so there’s a new demand for student living, such as condos.”

Source: Canadian Real Estate Magazine – by Neil Sharma  07 Feb 2019

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Do You Know Your Clients?

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Mortgage Professionals – get to know your clients! Millennials are just one of the surveyed groups from our Mortgage Consumer Survey. 

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Condo Nation

Condos reign supreme in Canada’s hottest cities. The majority of first-time homebuyers in Vancouver, Toronto and Montreal are picking condos, in part due to affordability challenges with single-family detached residential homes. Here are the numbers behind Canada’s condo explosion.

Source: Genworth.ca

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Condo or house: What’s right for you?

Do you want a condo or house? As a first-time homebuyer, this question is probably the first you’ll answer before starting your home hunt. Budget is a large factor, as is region: condos are king in urban markets like Vancouver, Toronto and Montreal, while houses are the go-to in Calgary and on the East Coast. Want to know what’s right for you? Take our “Condo or House?” quiz to shed light on your condo or house dilemma.

Condo or House?

Answer each question below, noting which answer you picked. Use our answer key and tally up your points to find out what’s better for you: condo or house.

Question 1: Can you afford to spend $500,000 or more on your first home?

  1. a) Yes.
  2. b) No.

Question 2: Do you work from home?

  1. a) Yes, most or all of the time.
  2. b) No.
  3. c) I may occasionally bring light work home.

Question 3: Are members of your household very busy with outside activities, or do you tend to be homebodies?

  1. a) We’re very busy and spend a lot of time outside.
  2. b) Most of our hobbies are home based.
  3. c) It’s a mix in our household.

Question 4: Do you enjoy outdoor chores like yardwork, gardening and home maintenance?

  1. a) Yes, I love working on my home and garden.
  2. b) No way!
  3. c) I’m not sure, but I’d consider it.

Question 5: Do you like to entertain friends and family in your home?

  1. a) Absolutely! We love hosting big family dinners and dinner parties.
  2. b) Sometimes, but we’re more into parties than sit-down meals.
  3. c) Yes, but we prefer intimate get-togethers, like having a couple of dinner guests over at a time.
  4. d) No, we prefer to host guests in a restaurant.

Question 6: What best describes your household composition?

  1. a) Living solo and loving it!
  2. b) We’re a couple, with no immediate plans for kids.
  3. c) We’re a couple, getting ready to start our family.
  4. d) We’re a full house of four or more, looking for room to grow!

Question 7: Minimalist living: yay or nay?

  1. a) Yay: I am the queen (or king) of clutter-free living!
  2. b) Nope: I like personalizing my space with my objects.

Answer key:

Q1:

If you selected A, add 10 points.

If you selected B, add 5 points.

December 2017’s national average house price was $614,575. While houses can be had for less, even in big cities like Edmonton, Ottawa and Montreal, those who live in the Greater Vancouver Area or Greater Toronto Area will find that a budget of half a million dollars limits them to condos.

Q2:

If you selected A, add 15 points.

If you selected B, add 5 points.

If you selected C, add 10 points.

Those who work from home should prioritize home office space; a spare bedroom is ideal. Others can get by with a small computer station or even converting a closet into a tuck-away office.

Q3:

If you selected A, add 15 points.

If you selected B, add 5 points.

If you selected C, add 10 points.

The more time you spend at home – and the more members of the household that join you – the more home you’ll need for comfort.

Q4:

If you selected A, add 15 points.

If you selected B, add 5 points.

If you selected C, add 10 points.

Owning a house comes with both seasonal tasks (shovelling snow, gardening, raking leaves, etc.) and weekly chores (taking the trash and recycling to the curb).

Q5:

If you selected A, add 15 points.

If you selected B, add 5 points.

If you selected C, add 5 points.

If you selected D, add 5 points.

Avid home chefs and entertainers will benefit from a roomy kitchen and an open-plan kitchen/dining/living area. A large backyard would be a perk. Condos needn’t cramp your style if you have smaller get-togethers, or if you host your birthday bash in a party room, the perfect pop-up spot for canapés and mingling.

Q6:

If you selected A, add 5 points.

If you selected B, add 5 points.

If you selected C, add 10 points.

If you selected D, add 15 points.

Although condo living is adaptable, at a certain point a growing family may be bursting at the seams and need more room to roam.

Q7:

If you selected A, add 5 points.

If you selected B, add 10 points.

Decluttering will keep your smaller space looking sharp. While houses also look their best when belongings are edited, they do provide more hiding spots for those things you’ve been meaning to purge (but haven’t gotten around to yet!).

Results:

Tally up your points and find out whether a condo or house is better suited to your lifestyle.

If you scored:

35-55: Confirmed Condo-ista

Between price and lifestyle considerations, urban condo living is ideal for you. You’ll love the convenient, maintenance-free condo lifestyle and, of course, being in the heart of the city’s action.

60-80: Ambivalent Shopper

Aspects of condo living (convenience, price point) hold strong appeal for you, but you’re also considering a house you can grow into. It wouldn’t hurt to explore both options, plus townhouses, which offer a bit of each home type.

85-95: Hard-Core House Hunter

You’re looking to live large in a home that does your lifestyle justice – and you’re willing to pay a premium and put in sweat equity to do it. You’ll love turning your house into a home, with room for the creature comforts you cherish.

 

Source: Genworth.ca

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Kid-friendly condo features

Condo living: it’s not just for young single people anymore. In big cities like Toronto and Vancouver, many millennial parents are choosing to set down roots in vertical communities, raising their kids in the dynamic environment they love. As a result, developers are starting to pay attention to the priorities of this up-and-coming homebuying demographic. Is city living suited to your family’s lifestyle? Here are six features to look for when hunting for a family-friendly condo.

FAMILY-FRIENDLY FEATURE NO. 1: More bedrooms

As recently as 2011, many condo-dwelling families had to rely on design hacks to carve out “bedroom” space in a smaller unit. That’s because during the 2001-11 period, less than one per cent of condos on the Toronto market had three bedrooms; today, for example, one major developer dedicates, on average, about 10 per cent of its new buildings to three-bedroom units, and roughly 40 per cent to two-bedroom units. Similar changes have been afoot in Canada’s other major condo markets. The City of Vancouver mandated in 2016 that all rezoning projects hit a target of 35 per cent “family units,” defined as units with two or more bedrooms. In Montreal, developers are also reaching out to the urban family demographic, with one Habitat Design Award-nominated project incorporating not just three-bedroom but even four-bedroom units. Family-sized condos are now easier to find, which means it is less likely you’ll have to use bookcases and curtains to fake out an extra bedroom.

FAMILY-FRIENDLY FEATURE NO. 2: Better storage

A tiny hall closet just won’t do when you’ve got strollers, trikes and other gear to stash. If you’ve got a growing family, maximum closet capacity is key. One way developers max out storage space is to design smaller bedrooms; that’s a small sacrifice to make if it makes getting in and out of your unit easier each day.

FAMILY-FRIENDLY FEATURE NO. 3: Indoor play zones

Just as the party room is a grown-up condo mainstay, indoor kids’ rooms are becoming hot tickets in family-oriented condo developments. With activity-friendly flooring, furniture and play stations, these indoor play centres are the perfect spot to hang out during a rainy morning or to meet up when you think your home is too messy for a play date!

FAMILY-FRIENDLY FEATURE NO. 4: Outdoor play areas

Many planned communities include parks and playgrounds in their adjacent outdoor space. Other kid-pleasing features include gardens, fountains, splash pads and pathways where kids can bike, in-line skate and play safe from car traffic. Who says you can’t have your own backyard if you live in a highrise?

FAMILY-FRIENDLY FEATURE NO. 5: Parking

If moving your brood around includes four wheels, you’ll be looking for a parking spot. Parking is a hot commodity, and many big-city condo buildings have significantly fewer parking spots than they do units. Keep in mind that a parking spot isn’t just a one-time purchase; it’s subject to additional monthly maintenance fees. If you’re an occasional driver, check the building’s proximity to a car share location. Avid cyclist? Look for a building with a secure bike room to avoid condo clutter and cut the risk of bike theft outdoors.

FAMILY-FRIENDLY FEATURE NO. 6: Location, location, location

One of the perks of urban living is proximity to work and big-city attractions. There’s something appealing about walking to the museum on a Saturday morning, or picking your kids up at daycare after work and leisurely strolling to a nice restaurant for dinner. Consider walkability and access to public transit when condo shopping. Trimming your commute and streamlining your day makes family life less stressful and way more fun.

Source: HomeOwnership.ca

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Buyers of new condos get twice the space in Waterloo as in Toronto

Cities west of GTA gain ‘notable traction’ in sales in first six months

New condominium buyers deterred by soaring Toronto prices are apparently venturing further afield to Hamilton, Kitchener and Waterloo, which offer more bang for their buck and the promise of new transit links that will improve accessibility.

Sales of new condominiums in these areas gained “notable traction” in the first six months of the year as regional economic activity picked up and Metrolinx moved forward with its $43-billion expansion plans, according to Altus Group, a market intelligence firm.

In Kitchener, sales between January and June rose to 806 units, up 93 per cent from the same period a year earlier, while 262 units were sold in Waterloo, a 51-per-cent jump. Though sales fell more than 20 per cent in Hamilton to 360 units, the city’s condominium market remains one of the most active outside Toronto, suggesting a continued flight to affordability, said Ray Wong, vice-president of data operations at Altus.

 

“The amount of demand in downtown Toronto, especially in the office market, has been well known for the last number of years and with that, demand for housing has steadily ratcheted up,” he said. “As these outlying areas are developed with more infrastructure in terms of restaurants and retail, it’s made them a lot more attractive.”

Those areas offer another powerful draw: the chance to secure a much larger space with a limited budget.

A buyer in Toronto with $500,000 to spend would likely have to settle for a one-bedroom unit of about 521 square feet, said Kruti Desai, manager of national research insights at Altus. But the same budget in Waterloo would secure a two-bedroom unit of 967 square feet.

Those in search of even more space could consider Barrie, Brantford, Cambridge, Guelph, Kitchener and St. Catharines, where $500,000 will buy a two- or three-bedroom unit with more than 1,000 square feet of space, she said.

“Individuals can get more bang for their buck when looking outside the Toronto market,” Desai said, adding that Hamilton, Kitchener and Waterloo are seeing the greatest amount of activity.

Momentum in Kitchener-Waterloo was linked both to affordability and to the economic growth kickstarted by Kitchener’s innovation hub and Waterloo’s Idea Quarter, a growing cluster of startup and technology companies operating in former BlackBerry Ltd. buildings.

Located close to the University of Waterloo campus and a future light-rail station, the Idea Quarter has attracted a range of firms — including OpenText Corp. and Auvik Networks Inc. — that “are now successfully competing for talent against Greater Toronto Area companies, helping stimulate condominium development,” Altus said in its report.

Hamilton, meanwhile, is expected to remain an attractive place to live for professionals working in Toronto, especially those who can take advantage of flexible working arrangements, Altus said.

A spike in new condominium sales in the city during the first three months of the year was credited to Television City Phase I, a 30-storey tower released in May 2017 that has since sold 80 per cent of the units on offer. Phase Two of the project, released in March, had sold 50 per cent of its units by the end of the second quarter.

Source: Financial Post – Naomi Powell August 8, 2018

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