Tag Archives: death and home ownership

3 reasons high household debt in Canada won’t contribute to a US-style housing crash

Photo: BasicGov/Flickr

By one measure, conditions in Canada are reminiscent of those present in the US right before a stateside housing bubble burst, yet a repeat performance to the north is unlikely.

Oxford Economics notes that the Canadian rate of debt to disposable income reached a record 167 percent last year, meaning for each dollar of disposable income households in Canada had, they owed $1.67.

In 2008 — ahead of the housing crash and financial crisis — the ratio was at 163 percent in the US.

However, there are a number of reasons that similarity isn’t likely a sign that Canadian households are stretched to the breaking point or US-style housing crash is imminent, Oxford Economics, a firm that specializes in economic forecasting and analysis, explains.

In economies with a higher share of indebted households, a few factors stand in the way of consumers defaulting on loans en masse. “In any leveraged economy, the key factors preventing defaults and rapid deleveraging include solid income growth, low interest rates, free-flowing and high-quality credit, and solid balance sheets,” writes Tony Stillo, Oxford Economics’ director of Canada Economics, in a Research Briefing.

“In that regard, there are some positive trends in Canada’s household finances,” Stillo continues, before homing in on three positive factors in a general climate of rising interest rates.

Canadian household income growth expected to continue

It’s not difficult to see why declining or stagnating incomes would be an issue for households dealing with rising debt levels.

Fortunately for Canadian households, Oxford Economics projects personal disposable income in Canada will increase by 12 percent from 2018 to 2020. “This will help households manage payment increases with higher [interest] rates,” Stillo says.

Debt quality in Canada is not a major concern

Citing Bank of Canada numbers, Stillo suggests big banks are approving fewer mortgages for borrowers with high levels of debt. Another possible positive is mortgage stress testing introduced a year ago.

The tests have now been expanded to force uninsured-mortgage applicants to approve for their loan at a higher rate than they are signing on for. This should be better prepared to handle higher borrowing costs in the future.

Mortgage arrears are still low in Canada

The share of mortgages in arrears (that’s at least three months of missed payments) in Canada sits at 0.24 percent, notes Oxford Economics. And in Ontario and BC, home to the country’s priciest markets, the rates are much lower. According to the Canadian Bankers association, 0.09 percent of Ontario-originated mortgages were arrears, while the rate was 0.14 in BC.

 

Source: – Livabl.com –  

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What happens to your mortgage after you die?

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They say death and taxes are the only two constants in life, so the question is, what happens to your mortgage when you die?

The short answer, according to Donna Lewczuk, a mortgage agent with Dominion Lending Centres, is “If you’re single and have no insurance, the executor of the estate will sell the property and pay back the mortgage. If you are married you can continue with the mortgage if you are able to make the payments.”

That’s because the mortgage stays with the property, not the person or persons, says Mary Wahbi, a partner at Folger Rubinoff LLP who looks after estates. “Not much will happen when you die, the mortgage isn’t triggered on your death and isn’t payable then but it is still your debt.”

The debt remains even after you die. Mortgages are also considered secured loans and the lenders want their money and they will come after your estate to get it. Secured creditors have a leg up when it comes to loans and if there is security, like your home, they will get paid first.

If you’re the sole owner of the property and you have a will, the executor of the estate will have the authority over your estate. They can either sell the property and use the money to discharge the mortgage or if there is enough money to carry the costs, the mortgage can continue to be paid. If you die without a will, Wahbi says that someone will apply to the court for authority over your estate and then the same decisions will be made regarding your property.

If you bought your home with a spouse, more than likely you’re considered joint tenants (check your legal documents from when you bought your home). When one joint tenant dies, the other gets the home automatically by right of survivorship and the home doesn’t pass through the deceased’s estate. So the spouse can continue to make the payments if they can afford it and then when the mortgage comes up for renewal, they can decide if they want to keep the home and negotiate a new mortgage based on their financial standing or sell it.

Now if you bought the home with a friend, you’re not considered joint tenants. You’re considered tenants in common and the surviving person doesn’t have the right of survivorship. The share of the home, the asset, becomes part of the deceased’s estate and is distributed according to their will. Even then, as there is still a mortgage, the secured creditors are still the first ones to get paid out of the estate.

“Banks don’t care who’s paying the mortgage once they get paid,” says Wahbi.

Source: LowestRates.ca – By: Renee Sylvestre-Williams on January 8, 2019

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