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Mark Cuban Says the Best Investment Is Paying Off Your Debt — Is He Right?

Mark Cuban Says the Best Investment Is Paying Off Your Debt -- Is He Right?

Image credit: Invision/AP/REX/Shutterstock via GOBankingRates

Billionaire investor and Shark Tank star Mark Cuban said that the safest investment you can make right now is to pay off your debt, according to an interview with Kitco News earlier this year.

 

“The reason for that is whatever interest you have — it might be a student loan with a 7 percent interest rate — if you pay off that loan, you’re making 7 percent,” said Cuban. “And so that’s your immediate return, which is a lot safer than trying to pick a stock, or trying to pick real estate or whatever it may be.”

Cuban is mostly right: More often than not, paying down debt as fast as possible is going to provide the most value in the long run. And perhaps more importantly, it will do so without any real risk that comes with most investing. That said, each person’s financial situation is different, so it is worth a closer look at when it’s better to pay off debt or invest.

Debt is like investing but in reverse.

One important thing to note is that the same principals that make investing so important also make paying off your debt similarly crucial. As Cuban points out, the interest rate on your loan is essentially like the rate of return on your investments but backward. In fact, many investments are simply ways you’re letting your money get loaned out to others in exchange for them paying interest.

As such, it’s important to keep in mind that as satisfying as it might be to watch your money grow in investments, it’s doing just the opposite when you have debt.

Every loan is different.

Although debt chips away at your net worth through interest, it’s important to note that different types of borrowing do so in very different ways. Every loan is different, with some offering terms that are actually quite favorable and others that can be excessively costly.

An overdue payday loan can lay waste to your financial health in no time, but a 30-year fixed-rate mortgage with a competitive rate can be relatively easy to manage with good planning. Borrowers should be sure they understand what kind of debt they have and how it’s affecting their finances.

 

Focus on the interest rate.

The key factor to take note of when considering how to allocate funds is the interest rate — usually expressed as your APR. Debt with a high APR is almost always going to be better to pay down before you focus on any other financial priorities beyond the most basic necessities.

The average APR on credit cards as of August 2018 was 14.38 percent. That’s well in excess of what anyone can reasonably expect to sustain as a return on most investments, so it shouldn’t be hard to see that investing instead of paying down your credit card is almost always going to cost you money in the long run.

Does your interest compound?

Another crucial factor in understanding how your debts and your investments differ is whether or not your interest is compounding. Compounding interest — like that on most credit cards — means that the money you pay in interest is added to the amount due and you’ll then have to pay interest on it in the future. That can lead to debt snowballing and growing exponentially. So, not only do credit cards have high interest rates, but they also make for debt that’s growing faster and faster unless you take action to pay it down.

However, that same principle can work in reverse. Gains on something like stocks will also compound over time, so there’s a similar dynamic at work when comparing your investment returns to fixed interest costs.

Know your risk tolerance.

Another factor that plays a big part in the conversation is your level of risk tolerance. Note that the question Cuban was responding to earlier was about what the “safest” investment was. For most people, erring well on the side of caution when it comes to something like personal finance just makes sense, and in that case, focusing on paying off debt is pretty crucial.

However, others might decide that the long-term payoffs that are possible make it worth rolling the dice on their future. Borrowing money for investments is common despite the risks associated, with everyone from massive investment banks to investors with margin accounts opting to take a calculated risk that their returns will ultimately outpace the cost of borrowing.

 

Costs of debt are set, investment returns often are not.

One important aspect of understanding the risks involved is that the cost of your debt is usually set and predictable, but the returns on your investments are not. It might be easy to look at the historical returns of the S&P 500 at just under 10 percent a year and assume that it’s worth it to put off paying down debt for an S&P 500 ETF or index fund as long as your APR is under 10 percent.

However, that long-term average does not reflect just how chaotic the markets really are. Sure, it might average out to about 10 percent, but some years will be in the negative — sometimes over 30 percent into the red. Even with bonds — where your rate of return is fixed — there is always a chance that the borrower will default and leave you with nothing.

If you have a variable rate loan

Of course, if your loan has variable interest rates, the equation changes yet again. You could see your interest rate rise or fall depending on what the Federal Reserve does, adding another layer of uncertainty to the decision — especially when it’s impossible to say with certainty which direction interest rates are headed in for the long run.

So, although debt will typically have more certainty associated with its costs than investing, that’s not always the case and variable rate loans could change things for some borrowers.

Don’t forget taxes.

You should also remember that the tax code includes a number of provisions that promote investment, and those can boost the value of investing. In particular, contributions to a 401(k) or traditional IRA are made with before-tax income, meaning that you can invest much more of that money than you would have with your after-tax income that would be used to pay down debt.

That’s especially true when you have an employer who matches your 401(k) contributions. If your employer matches, you’re essentially getting a chance to not just avoid paying taxes on that income, but you’re doubling its value the moment you invest — before it’s even started to accrue returns.

 

Some opportunities are unique.

Another important factor to consider is what type of investments you can make. In some very specific cases, you might have access to an investment opportunity that brings with it huge potential returns that could tip the scale. Maybe a specific local real estate investment you’re particularly familiar with or a startup company run by a family member where you can get in on the ground floor.

Opportunities like this usually come with enormous risks, but they can also create transformational shifts in wealth when they pay off. Obviously, you have to gauge each opportunity very carefully and make some hard choices, but if you do feel like it’s a truly unique chance to get the sort of returns that just don’t exist with publicly-traded stocks or bonds, it might be worth putting off paying down debt — especially if those debts have fixed rates and a reasonable APR.

What really matters with debt and investments

At the end of the day, you certainly shouldn’t opt to invest money that could be used to pay down debt unless the expectation for your returns is greater than the interest rate on your debt. If your personal loan has an APR of 15 percent, investing in stocks is probably not going to return enough to make it worthwhile. If that rate is 5 percent, though, you could very well do better with certain investments, especially if that’s a fixed rate that doesn’t compound.

But, even in circumstances where you might have reasonable expectations for returns higher than your APR, you might still want to take the definite benefits of paying down debt instead of the uncertain benefits associated with investments. When a wrong move might mean having to delay retirement or delay buying a home, opting for the sure thing is hard to argue with.

Which decision is right for you?

Unfortunately, there’s no magic bullet for knowing whether your specific circumstances call for you to prioritize paying down debt over everything else. Although paying down debt is typically going to be the smartest use for your money, that doesn’t mean you should do so blindly.

Putting off paying down your credit card balance to try your hand at picking some winning stocks is a (really) bad idea, but failing to make regular 401(k) contributions in an effort to pay off your fixed-rate mortgage a couple of years early is probably going to cost you in the long run — especially if you’re missing out on matching funds from your employer by doing so.

So, in a certain sense, Mark Cuban is right: Paying down debt is very rarely going to be a bad idea, and it’s almost always the safest choice. But that said, it’s still worth taking the time to examine the circumstances of your specific situation to be sure you’re not the exception that proves the rule.

Source: Entrepreneur – Joel Anderson , 

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The main reason Canadian homeowners refinance

 

The main reason that 15% of Canadian homeowners refinanced their homes was to consolidate debt.

That’s according to the CMHC Mortgage Consumer Survey which shows that debt consolidation outranked home improvements and that one third of refinancers say that their debt, including their mortgage, is higher than expected.

That said, 69% say they are comfortable with their current level of mortgage debt and 63% said that, if they run into financial problems, they have other assets they can tap to meet their needs.

The survey also showed that 68% were satisfied with their broker and 79% were satisfied with their lender but would have liked to receive more information from their mortgage professionals about mortgage or purchase fees, types of mortgages, closing costs and interest rates.

Refinancer facts
The CMC survey revealed the following insights about refinancers:

  • 24% are Generation Xers (35 – 44 years old) and 35% are baby boomers (55+ years old)
  • 54% are married
  • 61% are employed full time, 7% are self-employed and 17% are retired
  • Refinancers, along with repeat buyers, represent the highest proportion of self-employed mortgage consumers
  • 72% own a single-detached home
  • 23% have a household income of $60,000 – $90,000

Source: Canadian Real Estate – by Steve Randall 19 Nov 2018

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Homeowners’ typical mortgage payments are rising much faster than home prices

Homeowners’ typical mortgage payment is rising much faster than home prices, according to new data from CoreLogic.

The US median sale price has risen by just under 6% over the past year, according to CoreLogic. However, the principal-and-interest mortgage payment on a median-priced home has spiked by nearly 15 percent. And the trend looks set to continue – CoreLogic’s Home Price Index Forecast predicts that home prices will rise 4.7% year over year in August 2019. Mortgage payments, meanwhile, are forecast to have risen more than 11% in the same time period.

One way to measure the impact of inflation, mortgage rates and home prices on affordability is to use the so-called “typical mortgage rate,” CoreLogic said. That’s a mortgage-rate-adjusted monthly payment based on each month’s median US home sale price, calculated using Freddie Mac’s average rate on a 30-year mortgage with a 20% down payment.

“The typical mortgage payment is a good proxy for affordability because it shows the monthly amount that a borrower would have to qualify for to get a mortgage to buy the median-priced US home,” said CoreLogic analyst Andrew LePage.

While the US median sale price in August was up about 5.7% year over year, the typical mortgage payment was up 14.5% because of a neatly 0.7-percentage-point hike in mortgage rates over the time period, LePage said.

Source: Mortgage Professionals America – by Ryan Smith18 Nov 2018

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Credit scores are getting a makeover. Here’s what you should know

Soon, you may be able to have a credit score even if you have no borrowing history and  don't use credit cards.

Soon, you may be able to have a credit score even if you have no borrowing history and don’t use credit cards.

Getty Images

Credit scores are the linchpin of the consumer lending system — and they’re mostly focused on debt.

Banks need to have a way to measure the risk that customers will default on their loans so they can decide whether to lend, how much and at what interest rate. But the main financial behaviour credit scores pick up on is the ability to pay back debt. Usually, it doesn’t matter much whether you’ve never missed rent or have been dutifully squirrelling away money into your savings account.

 

That may be about to change. In the U.S., Fair Isaac Corp. (FICO), creator of North America’s widely used FICO score, is rolling out a so-called UltraFico score based on how cash flows in and out of customers’ chequing, savings and money market accounts. The company is planning to roll out the new score early next year.

By signing up through an app, Americans who agree to data collection from their bank accounts will get an UltraFICO score that could boost their FICO score. That could improve their chances to be approved for a loan or allow them to borrow at cheaper rates.

WATCH: Apps that help Canadians save

The company says seven out of 10 consumers who show average savings of $400 without going into overdraft for three months will see a credit score boost. It also estimates that 15 million consumers who currently don’t have a regular FICO score could get an UltraFICO score. The idea is that this could be a toehold on the credit score ladder for many people.

It isn’t clear how soon the UltraFico score will make it to Canada. Credit bureau Equifax Canada, which uses a number of FICO scores, told Global News it’s “too early to share specific details on new scores.” TransUnion did not return a request for comment.

But others are working on coming up with new ways to calculate customers’ credit default risk.

 

In Ontario, DUCA Credit Union is also trying to develop metrics for lending without using borrowing history.

One of its pilot programs targets Canadians with low credit scores. Through a partnership with fintech startup CacheFlow, the credit union is hoping to be able to lend to those with low credit using their cashflow data.

CacheFlow’s software for financial advisers creates a cashflow plan that, among other things, tells clients how much they can spend every month in order to achieve their savings or debt-repayment goals.

 

Working with Prosper Canada, a financial literacy charity, DUCA plans to offer cheaper loans to CacheFlow users with low credit scores who would normally turn to expensive debt options like payday lenders. The credit union will structure loan repayments according to each individual’s cashflow.

The goal is to lower the share of income that goes to loan repayment and, in the long run, help clients be debt-free or graduate to mainstream lending.

“What you don’t want to do is find a new way to assess credit, only to fill a gap with another loan that’s reused all the time because all you’ve done is put a Band-Aid on a symptom,” DUCA president and CEO Doug Conick told Global News.

 
In a similar vein, the credit union is also focusing on professionals who are newcomers to Canada, where they have no credit history.

It can take some time for, say, a doctor from Southeast Asia to be able to practice in this country. Accreditation is often a complicated and expensive process, said Keith Taylor, executive director of the DUCA Impact Lab, which is spearheading these new lending initiatives.

With no access to credit, foreign-trained professionals often end up getting a low-paying job so they can support their families, Taylor said. And that can significantly delay and sometimes compromise their ability to get Canadian licencing.

 

But is it all good?

Licensed insolvency trustee Doug Hoyes is no fan of the old way of calculating credit scores.

There are some obvious problems with the current system, which “rewards borrowing,” Hoyes said.

For example, current credit rating models recommend borrowers who use a low percentage of what they can take out on revolving credit accounts such as credit cards and lines of credit. This means that someone with three credit cards, each with a $10,000 limit and a $3,000 outstanding balance, may have a better credit score than someone earning the same income who has a $600 balance on one $1,000 card, Hoyes wrote in a blog post.

“That is ridiculous,” he said.

Relying on a record of cash transactions could be a good thing, he added, but the devil is in the details.

 

For one, Hoyes is concerned about privacy.

“This creates a pipeline to your bank account. Is it worth it?”

After all, he noted, credit bureaus have not been immune from data hacks. In 2017, Equifax revealed it had suffered a breach that affected nearly 150 million Americansand over 19,000 Canadians.

The other question is whether a cashflow-based risk rating could also end up encouraging consumers to take out loans they can’t comfortably afford or aren’t able to manage.

Relying on banking information would eliminate the need for people to take out loans they don’t need just so they can build a credit history and work their way up to, say, being able to get a mortgage.

It could also benefit individuals with low credit scores who display financially responsible behaviour.

 

But Hoyes worries they could also encourage some to borrow too much too soon.

For young people and those new to Canada and its financial system, it might not be a bad idea to be able to borrow only small amounts at first.

“If you don’t pay off your $500 credit card, that will rarely be financially fatal,” he said. Missing payments on a mortgage would be a much more serious mistake.

“I can see how (the new system) could help some people but also hurt others,” Hoyes said.

For his part, DUCA’s Conick says he’s determined to stay on the right side of that fork in the road.

“What I don’t want to get us involved in is finding a much better mouse trap to assess risk and provide credit that can be abused,” he said.

Source: Global TV –

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Can you walk away from your home?

The fluctuating housing market can make purchasing a house a bit of a gamble. If you buy when prices are high and the value of your home goes down, most homeowners can just wait it out. Houses are long-term investments and eventually with time you know the market will rise again.

“If you bought at the market high and prices drop, you could be underwater on paper, which means you owe more than the home is worth. If you’re not planning to sell and you can meet your payments, you don’t lose,” says Scott Terrio, manager of consumer insolvency for debt relief experts Hoyes, Michalos & Associates. “It becomes a problem for someone who discovers they can’t carry the mortgage payment plus all their other debt, especially if they’ve lost a job, dealt with an illness or they’ve simply run out of credit.” In those instances, it may make fiscal sense for the homeowner to abandon their mortgage and walk away. The home goes into foreclosure — the home is turned over to the lender, who attempts to recover their investment by forcing the sale of the home and using the money to pay off most of the debt.

If you have lots of debt and you’re not meeting your payments, can you simply choose to pack up your belongings and walk away from your high-priced mortgage?
If you have lots of debt and you’re not meeting your payments, can you simply choose to pack up your belongings and walk away from your high-priced mortgage?  (CONTRIBUTED)

This happened frequently in the U.S. during the financial crash in 2008; lenders were forced to absorb the unrecovered debt. Could this happen in Canada? It’s not quite as simple here. “In Ontario and most other provinces, there are full recourse rules, which means you can’t walk away from your mortgage obligation without recourse from the lender, who can pursue mortgage shortfalls in court,” explains Terrio. However, homeowners can file a proposal or bankruptcy, which makes any shortfall unsecured (like other debt such as student loans, payday loans, car loans, line of credit and credit card debt). “Once a proposal or bankruptcy is filed, you can’t be sued for any shortfall, which is the difference between what you owe and what the lender can get for the house.”

What is the difference between filing a proposal and filing for bankruptcy? They’re both solutions to resolve debt and provide legal protection from creditors (for example, creditors stop wage garnishments). In bankruptcy, you surrender certain assets in exchange to discharge debt. When you file a proposal, you make an offer to settle debt for less than you owe.

“Proposals are filed more frequently with our clients now than bankruptcy,” explains Terrio. While you have to make a better offer to your creditor than what they would get if you filed bankruptcy, “it has less impact on your credit long-term and you can keep your belongings, which makes it a very realistic and favourable option for many.”

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New mortgages up 63% among Canadians aged 73-93: TransUnion

NEWS: MONEY 123: WEIGHING THE COSTS AND BENEFITS OF REVERSE MORTGAGESX

https://globalnews.ca/video/embed/4359268/#autoplay&stickyiframe=video_4359268&mute

WATCH: Reverse mortgages have recently increased in popularity as nearly one-third of Canadians are approaching retirement with little or no savings.

– A A +

The volume of new mortgages across Canada has been slowing down in recent months, amid rising interest rates and tougher federal regulations, a new TransUnion report shows. But the country’s oldest homeowners are bucking that trend – big time.

Among Canadians aged 73 to 93, the so-called silent generation or pre-war generation, the number of mortgages issued between January and March of 2018 was up a whopping 63 per cent compared to the same period last year, TransUnion data shows. Baby boomers are also getting new mortgages, although the increase in loan originations among Canada’s 54- to 72-year-olds is a more modest 18 per cent.

 

That stands in stark contrast with what’s happening with the country’s first-time homebuyers and younger generations in general. Mortgage originations were down 19 per cent among millennials (ages 24-38) and 22 per cent among gen-Z (18-23).

 

Overall, the number of new mortgages issued between January and March was down 3.4 per cent compared to the same period last year. This follows at eight per cent drop in the last three months of 2017 compared to the last three months of 2016. (New mortgages include brand new loans, loans renewed at a different lender and refinancing.)

Older generations could be re-mortgaging or borrowing against their home equity in order to “support retirement or to financially support younger generation family members,” the TransUnion report reads.

Research shows that retirement expenses tend to skyrocket around age 80, due to health care and long-term care costs.

WATCH: Why women need to save more for retirement

But the pre-war generation is also joining forces with boomers to help the younger kin.

“We hear of parents and grandparents supporting their children and grandchildren, whether it’s student loans or buying a house,” Matt Fabian, director of financial services research and consulting for TransUnion Canada, told Global News.

 

That said, as large as the six-fold surge in new mortgages issued to Canada’s 70-to-90-year-olds may seem, the volume of mortgages in that age group remains very small, Fabian said. (The data does not include reverse mortgages, TransUnion said.)

Still, the numbers do suggest that the stricter mortgage rules introduced on Jan. 1 of this year are having a much bigger impact on newer generations.

“The stress-testing rules are about affordability,” Fabian said. Younger mortgage applicants may be either finding out that they don’t qualify or that they can’t get the amount and loan type they want, he added.

Older Canadians who have enjoyed remarkable home-equity gains in the last few years don’t have to worry about stricter standards on things like loan-to-value ratios, Fabian said.

The data also shows significant variations across cities. While new mortgages dropped by almost 18 per cent in Toronto, they remained virtually flat in Vancouver, with growth of less than one per cent in the first three months of 2018 compared to the previous year.

But new mortgage volumes rose in Ottawa (up 8.4 per cent) and Montreal (up 5.2 per cent), where relatively low real estate prices have been attracting an influx of buyers.

WATCH: How mortgage stress tests are affecting millennials

More credit cards and higher balances

Canadians may be having a harder time getting a mortgage, but they aren’t giving up their credit cards.

TransUnion reported a “surge” in the number of credit cards issued in the first three months of 2018, which was up 5.6 per cent year-over-year across all age groups.

“This represents a dramatic shift compared to an approximate 10 per cent decline year-over-year from [the first quarter of] 2016 to [the first quarter of] 2017,” the report said.

The average consumer now carries a balance of $4,200, the data shows. Collectively, Canadians now owe $99 billion through their credit cards.

READ MORE: Here’s what happens to $1K in credit card debt when you make only minimum payments

Total non-mortgage debt still rising, although at a slower rate

Overall, the average Canadian had almost $29,650 in debt excluding mortgages in the period between April and June, an increase of almost four per cent compared to the same three months in 2017, TransUnion said.

“This is the third consecutive quarter where the quarterly change is less than the change seen in the previous year,” the report noted.

In other words, Canadians continue to borrow more, but at least the pace at which they’re piling on debt has slowed.

Source: Global TV – 

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The solution to debt isn’t more credit

Here’s the litmus test for determining if you have too much debt: if your income was delayed, could you pay your monthly bills? “If you couldn’t meet those expenses, you’ve got too much debt,” says Doug Hoyes, licensed insolvency trustee for debt relief experts Hoyes, Michalos & Associates. “We often see our clients facing this situation. They might think the answer is to borrow to alleviate the immediate problem. But the solution to too much debt is not to get into more debt. You have to get off the hamster wheel.”

The cycle Hoyes is talking about goes something like this: Something happens to cause an initial shortfall. It might be that you get sick, injured, lose your job, split with your partner. You start to put too much on your credit cards and you can’t pay them off. “Then, you get an additional credit card and you continue to rack up more and more debt on your cards. The number of cards and balances keep going up.”

When you’re finding it difficult to make ends meet, more borrowing isn’t the answer.
When you’re finding it difficult to make ends meet, more borrowing isn’t the answer.  (CONTRIBUTED)

Now you have a problem, so you decide to solve it by consolidating your debt. You might try and apply for a line of credit, which you may not qualify for, or get a payday loan with monstrous interest rates. “Once you start getting payday loans, it’s very difficult to recover,” warns Hoyes. “In some instances, payday loans cost you $15 for every $100 you borrow. In order to pay it off, many of our clients have to get another payday loan.”

So how do you stop this cycle of debt? “Rather than continuing to add more to what you already owe, it’s important to stop borrowing and stop the bleeding,” says Hoyes. He suggests taking an inventory of what you owe and then making an honest budget to see if you can find a way to pay it back on your own. “You might also consider ways to add income rather than just deal with expenses. Perhaps you get a second job or a roommate to help with expenses.” In the likely situation where you discover you can’t do it on your own, consider talking with a Licensed Insolvency Trustee to help you find a way to pay off a few debts.

For most clients, the best way to deal with debt is a consumer proposal or bankruptcy, explains Hoyes. “In a consumer proposal, we make a deal to pay back considerably less than the amount owing. Instead of making minimum payments for decades or declaring bankruptcy — your last resort — with a consumer proposal, you pay an agreed amount that’s much less than what you owe over a five-year period. Then three years later, it comes off your credit report.”

As Hoyes explains, it’s not about consumers running from debt. “It allows them an opportunity to make manageable payments and ultimately, get a fresh start.”

 

Source: The Star – Thu., Aug. 16, 2018

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