Tag Archives: flipping real estate

The Top 8 Real Estate Calculations Every Investor Should Memorize

investment-portfolio
Despite what many of us math-allergic folk would prefer, real estate does involve some math. Luckily, most of the formulas are simple and straight-forward. In fact, if you can master the calculations below, you should be just fine.

The Top 8 Real Estate Calculations Every Investor Should Memorize

Cap Rate

Net Operating Income / Total Price of Property

Example:

NOI: $25,000

Total Price (Purchase + Rehab): $300,000

$25,000 / $300,000 = 0.083 or an 8.3 Cap Rate

This calculation is mostly used for valuing apartment complexes and larger commercial buildings. It can be used for houses and small multifamily too, but operating expenses are erratic with houses (because you don’t know how often and how bad your turnovers will be).

Related: The Investor’s Complete Guide to Calculating, Understanding & Using Cap Rates

You want to have a cap rate that is at least as good, preferably better, than comparable buildings in the area. I almost always want to be at an 8 cap rate or better, although in some areas, that’s not really possible. And always be sure to use real numbers or your own estimates when calculating this. Do not simply use what’s on the seller-provided pro forma (or as I call them, pro-fake-a).

Rent/Cost

Monthly Rent / Total Price of Property

Example:

Monthly Rent: $1,000

Total Price of Property (Purchase + Rehab): $75,000

Rent/Cost = $1,000 / $75,000 = 0.0133 or a 1.33% Rent/Cost

This is a great calculation for houses and sometimes small multifamily apartments. That being said, it should only be used when comparing the rental value of like properties. Do not compare the rent/cost of a property in a war zone to that in a gated community. A roof costs the same, square foot for square foot, in both areas. And vacancy and delinquency will be higher in a bad area, so rent/cost won’t tell you what your actual cash flow will be. The the old 2% rule can lead investors astray, and they shouldn’t use it. But when comparing like properties in similar areas, rent/cost is a very helpful tool.

According to Gary Keller in The Millionaire Real Estate Investor, the national average is 0.7%. For cash flow properties, you definitely want to be above 1%. We usually aim for around 1.5%, depending on the area. And yes, I would recommend having a target rent/cost percentage for any given area.

Gross Yield

Annual Rent / Total Price of Property

Example:

Annual Rent: $9,000

Total Price (Purchase + Rehab): $100,000

Gross Yield = $9,000 / $100,000 = .09 or a 9% gross yield

This is basically the same calculation as above but flipped around. It’s used more often when valuing large portfolios from what I’ve seen, but overall, it serves the same purpose as rent/cost.

Debt Service Ratio

Net Operating Income / Debt Service

Example:

NOI: $25,000

Annual Debt Service: $20,000

Debt Service Ratio = $25,000 / $20,000 = 1.25

This is the most important number that banks look at and is critical for getting financing. Generally, a bank will look at both the property’s debt service ratio and your “global” debt service ratio (i.e. the debt service ratio of your entire company or portfolio).

Anything under 1.0 means that you will lose money each month. Banks don’t like that (and you shouldn’t either). Generally, banks will want to see a 1.2 ratio or higher. In that way, you have a little cushion to afford the payments in case things get worse.

Cash on Cash

Cash Flow / Cash In Deal

Example:

Cash Flow (Net Operating Income – Debt Service): $10,000

Cash Into Deal: $40,000

Cash on Cash: $10,000 / $40,000 = .25 or 25%

In the end, this is the most important number. It tells you what kind of return you are getting on your money. In the above example, if you had $40,000 in the deal and made $10,000 that year, you made 25%. This is a critical calculation not only when it comes to valuing a property, but also when it comes to evaluating what kind of debt or equity structure to use when purchasing it.

The 50% Rule

Operating Income X 0.5 = Probable Operating Expenses

Example:

Operating Income: $100,000

Operating Expenses = $100,000 * 0.5 = $50,000

This is a shorthand rule that I judge to be OK. It is for estimating the expenses of a property. Whenever possible, use real numbers (i.e., the operating statement), but this is good for filtering out deals that don’t make sense. Just remember, a nicer building will have a lower ratio of expenses to income than a worse one and other factors, like who pays the utilities come into play. Don’t simply rely on this rule.

Related: Rental Property Numbers so Easy You Can Calculate Them on a Napkin

The 70% Rule

Strike Price = (0.7 X After Repair Value) – Rehab

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After Repair Value: $150,000

Rehab: $25,000

Strike Price = (0.7 X $150,000) – $25,000 = $80,000

This is another rule like the 50% rule, although I think this one is better. This one is for coming up with an offer price. Always crunch the numbers down to the closing costs before actually purchasing a property. But if you offer off the 70% rule, you should be just fine as long as your rehab estimate and ARV (after repair value) estimates are correct.

Comparative Market Analysis

Unfortunately, there’s no real calculation for this. It’s mostly used for houses, and it’s all about finding the most similar properties and then making adjustments so that a homeowner or investor would find each deal identical. The MLS is by far the best for this, but Zillow can work too (just don’t rely on the Zestimate). For a more detailed explanation, go here.

In the end, the math isn’t that bad. No rocket science here luckily. Instead, there are just a few handy calculations and rules to evaluate properties before purchase and analyze their performance afterward. Memorize these, and you should be fine.

What formulas do you use to analyze your deals? Any calculations you’d add to this list?

Let me know with a comment!

Source: BiggerPockets – Andrew Syrios
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Is investing in Canadian real estate still viable?

When a series of tax and mortgage rules was introduced in Canada in 2016 to prevent a housing market bubble, activity slowed down significantly in the years that followed. Given the current circumstances, is it still viable to invest in property?

In a think piece in Macleans, market watcher Romana King said even with fears of a global recession, real estate is still a smart way to invest.

“For investors, the key to making strategically smart decisions is to consider the underlying economic factors that impact your investment,” she said.

King said the housing market could climb out of negative growth forecasts this year. Citing figures from the Canadian Real Estate Association, she said the national sales activity was on target to increase by 5% in 2019 and could expand further by 7.5% in 2020.

“Canada boasts strong population growth, and government budgetary decisions are acting as stimulants for the national housing market, all of which point to a healthy future for Canada’s real estate market,” she said.

Investing in real estate, however, is not without risks. For investors, it is crucial to know some strategies to lessen the potential risks, King said. The first is to be aware of additional debt. Investors must keep an eye on their credit scores and pay bills on time.

“Most investors will require a mortgage to purchase rental real estate. This can alter your debt ratios, which can impact whether or not you get the best mortgage or loan rates. Talk to an advisor before applying for new credit or renewing a current loan,” King said.

Another must-have strategy is budgeting. King said investors need to control how much they spend on maintenance and repairs to ensure that their rental properties are cash-flow positive.

“An investor needs to budget for a contingency fund. If the anticipated monthly rent covers all monthly expenses, including a repair fund, then the property is cash-flow positive, which is fundamental for a good investment,” she said.

Getting insurance could also mitigate the risks of catastrophic events.

“Virtually all insurance policies will cover a catastrophic loss of a building, but as a real estate investor, you must also consider the loss of income due to damage or destruction. A comprehensive rental policy will provide a landlord with income to replace lost rent at fair market value,” she said.

Overall, investors need to treat real estate investing as a business. Citing Edmonton-based investor Jim Yih, King said the key to successful real estate investing is positive cash flow, and not just the purchase price and the potential sale price.

Source; Canadian Real Estate Magazine – by Gerv Tacadena 12 Nov 2019
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    Cash Flow vs Capital Gains: The 2 Types of Investment Income

    Cash Flow vs Capital Gains by Kim Kiyosaki

    Making money through cash flow versus capital gains

    How do you currently make money? By going to your job every day and collecting a biweekly paycheck in exchange for your work? Most people make money this way, because it’s what they are taught to do by their parents or teachers. Also, it feels like a safe and secure path because it’s the traditional route.

    Well, what if I told you that there’s another way? Another path in life that doesn’t require you to trade time for money? A path that allows you to follow your passion, achieve financial freedom, and reach your life goals? Now I’ve piqued your interest, right?

    This path is precisely how the rich make their money — and it’s not from an hourly wage or salary. Instead, they make their money from their investments. In fact, the best way to make money is as an investor — but the question I’m often asked is: How do you make that money? If your monthly income as an investor does not come from a job, then where does it come from?

    Making Your Money Work for You

    If there’s one thing the rich do differently than the poor, it’s that they put their money to work instead of working for their money. What does that mean? Their money isn’t just sitting around in a savings account, accruing little-to-no interest, waiting for a rainy day. Their money is being invested — and delivering a return!

    Different investments produce different results. The question is, what results do you want?

    There are two primary outcomes an investor invests for:

    Investor Income #1: Capital Gains

    If you enjoy watching those “fix it up and flip it” TV shows, you’re probably already familiar with the concept of capital games — essentially, it’s the game of buying and selling for a profit.

    In real estate, let’s say you buy a single-family house for $100,000. You make some repairs and improvements to the property, and you sell it for $140,000. Your profit is termed “capital gains.” Any time you sell an asset or investment and make money, your profit is capital gains. Of course, there are also capital losses (which occur when you lose money on a sale).

    The same concept holds true outside of real estate. If you buy a share of stock for $20, and sell it once the stock price increases to $30, that’s also a capital gains profit.

    The Problem with Capital Gains

    While there is money to be made through capital gains, it’s also important to note the risks.

    First, it’s a formula you have to keep repeating over and over again — you have to keep buying and selling, buying and selling, and buying and selling, or the game and the income stop.

    Second, if the real estate market takes a nosedive, “flippers”— people who buy a real estate property and quickly turn around and sell it for a profit, or capital gains — can get caught with inventory they can’t sell.

    Before the housing bubble burst in 2008, the mindset for many was that the market would continue to go up. So, when the market reversed and crashed, the properties were no longer worth what the flippers bought them for, and there were no buyers to flip the properties to. This led to a record-breaking number of foreclosures, and people simply walking away from homes.

    Most investors today are chasing capital gains in the stock market through stock purchases, mutual funds, and 401(k)s. These investors are hoping and praying the money will be there when they get out. To me, that’s risky.

    As long as market prices go up, capital-gains investors win. But when the markets turn down and prices fall — something nobody can predict — capital-gains investors lose. Do you really want that gamble?

    Investor Income #2: Cash Flow

    Cash flow is realized when you purchase an investment and hold on to it, and every month, quarter, or year that investment returns money to you. Cash-flow investors, unlike capital-gains investors, typically do not want to sell their investments because they want to keep collecting the regular income of cash flow. If you aren’t already familiar with my motto, cash flow is queen!

    If you purchase a stock that pays a dividend, then, as long as you own that stock, it will generate money to you in the form of a dividend. That is called cash flow. To cash flow in real estate, you could purchase a single-family house and, instead of fixing it up and selling it, you rent it out. Every month you collect the rent and pay the expenses, including the mortgage. If you bought it at a good price and manage the property well, you will receive a profit, or positive cash flow.

    The cash-flow investor is not as concerned as the capital-gains investor whether the markets are up one day or down the next. The cash-flow investor is looking at long-term trends and is not affected by short-term market ups and downs — what a great position to be in!

    The Advantage of Cash Flow versus Capital Gains Investing

    The best thing about cash flow is that it’s money flowing into your pocket on a continual basis — whether you’re working or not. You could be on the golf course, jet-setting around the world, watching Neflix in your jammies, or building a business, and your money is busy working for you. And generally, cash-flow investing is based on fundamentals that aren’t as susceptible to market swings like capital-gains investments, which means that even in bad times, money still flows into your pockets.

    Additionally, cash flow is what is known as passive income, which is the lowest taxed type of income. This is not always the case with capital gains taxes, which vary depending on the type of asset you’ve invested in and how long you’ve owned that asset. In some cases, the taxes can be very high.

    If you’re ready to start enjoying the lifestyle advantages of cash flow, don’t miss my recent blog on getting started with real estate.

    Source – RichDad.com – Kim Kiyosaki Original publish date: September 12, 2013 (Lastupdated:April 18, 2019)
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    Condo flippers beware: The taxman is watching you, and has new tools at his disposal to ‘take action’

    A condo building in downtown Toronto.Jack Boland/Toronto Sun/Postmedia Network

    If you plan on selling a home or condo that you bought fairly recently, especially if you never actually moved into it, be wary as the tax man will be carefully watching how you report any gain on your tax return, lest it be seen as a “flip” and be fully taxable as income, rather than a half-taxable capital gain.

    The Canada Revenue Agency’s ability to hunt you down over your real estate transactions has improved thanks to the recent $50-million boost in funding over five years announced in the 2019 federal budget to help “address tax non-compliance in real estate transactions.” The CRA uses advanced risk assessment tools, analytics and third-party data to detect and “take action” whenever it finds real estate transactions where the parties have failed to pay the required taxes. Specifically, the CRA is focusing on ensuring that taxpayers report all sales of their principal residence on their tax returns, properly report any capital gain derived from a real estate sale where the principal residence tax exemption does not apply, and report money made on real estate “flipping” as 100 per cent taxable income.

    But what, exactly, constitutes a real estate flip? That was the subject of a recent Tax Court of Canada decision, released this week.

     

    The case involved a transit operator for the Toronto Transit Commission who, along with his brother, bought and moved into a two-story, three-bedroom townhouse in Vaughan, Ontario, in 1999. His brother contributed toward the initial down payment, lived with him and together they equally shared all household expenses, including the mortgage payments. In 2003, the taxpayer’s brother met the woman who would become his future wife, whom he married in April 2007. She moved into the townhouse and they had a child together in February 2008.

    Sometime prior to this, the taxpayer and his brother began discussing going their separate ways. The taxpayer testified that he wanted to sell the townhouse and move to a place that was smaller and closer to work. Indeed, in 2006 he found a smaller place, a two-bedroom condo, which was in the pre-construction phase. The tentative occupancy date of the condo was April 2008, but that date was pushed back several times, ultimately to 2010.

    Prior to taking possession of the condo, however, circumstances changed. In December 2008, the brothers’ father passed away while in Jamaica, where he lived together with their mother for about six months each year. Following their father’s death, their mother did not feel safe living alone in Jamaica and in March 2009 she moved into her sons’ townhouse. The taxpayer testified that his brother and his family shared the master bedroom, while the taxpayer and their mother each occupied one of the remaining two bedrooms. This living situation didn’t last long and the taxpayer refinanced the mortgage on the townhouse in order to buy out his brother’s share of the property, enabling him and his family to move out.

    In August 2010, the taxpayer took possession of the condo and immediately arranged to list it for sale, realizing that it would be too small for both he and his mother. No one lived in the condo in the interim. He sold it in October 2010 resulting in a net gain of $13,412, which the taxpayer reported as a capital gain, taxable at 50 per cent, on his 2010 tax return. The CRA reassessed him, finding that the $13,412 should have been reported as fully taxable income and slapped him with gross negligence penalties.

    The common question of whether a gain from the sale of real estate is on account of income or on account of capital always comes down to the underlying facts. The courts will look to the surrounding circumstances and, perhaps most importantly, the taxpayer’s intention.

    The judge reviewed the facts in light of the four factors previously enumerated by the Supreme Court of Canada by which these types of cases are decided: the taxpayer’s intention, whether the taxpayer was engaged in any way in the real estate industry, the nature and use of the property sold and the extent to which the property was financed.

    The taxpayer testified that he purchased the condo with the full intention of living in it after his brother moved out of their shared townhouse; however, when his father died and his mother wished to return to Canada to live full-time, the taxpayer “changed his plans to move so that his mother could live with him at (the townhouse), which was a larger space.” He testified that since he could not afford to own both homes, he listed and sold the condo shortly after assuming title. As he testified, if not for his father’s death and his mother’s return to Canada, he would have carried out his plan to sell the townhouse and live in the condo as his primary residence.

    The judge concluded that the taxpayer’s intention with respect to the condo was indeed to live in it as his primary residence. He had no secondary intention of putting the condo up for resale at the time of purchase.

    The judge therefore concluded that the sale of the condo was properly reported as a capital gain and ordered the CRA to reassess on that basis and cancel the gross negligence penalties.

    One final note is warranted: while justice was ultimately done and the taxpayer prevailed, it actually took him nine years and three separate visits to court to get relief. The CRA originally reassessed his 2010 capital gain as income back in 2014. The taxpayer filed a Notice of Objection to oppose the reassessment, which was reconfirmed by the CRA in January 2016. The taxpayer then had 90 days to appeal the CRA’s reassessment to the Tax Court. For a variety of reasons, he missed that deadline and ended up in Tax Court seeking an extension of the deadline to file an appeal. The Tax Court denied his request for an extension. He then went to the Federal Court of Appeal which, in June 2017, reversed the lower court’s decision and allowed an extension of time to appeal to Tax Court, which heard the case in March 2019 and released its decision this week.

     

    Source: Financial Post – Jamie Golombek July 5, 2019

     

    Jamie Golombek, CPA, CA, CFP, CLU, TEP is the Managing Director, Tax & Estate Planning with CIBC Financial Planning & Advice Group in Toronto.

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    7-Step Process for Finding Great Contractors for Home Renovations

    To be blunt, most contractors are terrible. As a landlord, I deal with it all the time. 

    They don’t answer their phone. They don’t show up when they said they would. They don’t do what they said they are going to do.

    But there ARE gems to be found in the rubble. The problem is most people have no idea how to identify that great contractor from all the bad ones out there—until long AFTER they’ve already hired one.

    I want to share with you my seven-step process to identify a great contractor before hiring them. Whether you’re remodeling your own home, a rental property, flipping houses, or need a contractor for something else, here’s how to land a great one.

    How to Find a Great Contractor

    1. Build your contractor list

    What I mean by this is you need to get the names and phone numbers of a lot of different contractors in your area. I mean, if we’re searching for a needle in a haystack, we have to first get a haystack.

    You can find potential contractors in a number of ways, but my three favorite are: 

    1. Referrals, meaning ask people you know who they have used
    2. Referrals, so yeah, asking people you know who they have used
    3. You guessed it! Referrals.

    Human nature is to generally do what you’ve always done. It doesn’t guarantee success, but when you know a contractor has done great work in the past, it’s likely they’ll do it again.

    So get in the habit of asking your friends and family often—even when you’re not looking for a contractor. “Who did this work for you?” Then, keep track of those referrals.

    There are a few other ways to find contractors, as well. I like to talk to other contractors and ask who they like working with.

    Rockstars tend to party with other rockstars, and good tradesmen tend to work with other good tradesmen.

    For example, I have a great finish carpenter, so I can ask him, “Hey, do you know any great plumbers?”

    You can also build your list by snapping a photo every time you see a contractor sign on the side of a work truck, or by searching Yelp, or by asking the employees in the pro department of your local home store who they like.

    Related: The Ultimate Guide to Finding an Incredible Contractor

    1. Pre-screening on the phone and in person

    Just as with tenants, our opinion of the contractor begins the moment we start talking with them, whether over email, phone, or in person.

    Do they carry themselves professionally? Do they respond well to questions?

    Ask them some general questions, such as:

    • How long have you been in this line of work?
    • What skill would you say you are the best at?
    • What job tasks do you hate doing?
    • In what cities do you typically work?
    • How many employees work for you? (Or “work in your company” if you are not talking to the boss.)
    • How busy are you?
    • Do you pull permits, or would I need to?
    • If I were to hire you, when could you start knocking out tasks?

    Then, set up a time to meet and show them the project, if you have one. Set an appointment and be sure to show up a few minutes early, just to see exactly what time they arrive.

    Are they on time? Late? Early? Do they look professional? How do they act?

    If everything feels OK after this first meeting, move on to the next step.

    man sitting at desk working on a computer

    1. Google them

    The first thing we do now when looking for information on a certain contractor is to simply search Google for their name and their company name. This can often unearth any big red flags about the person.

    You’ll also want to add your city name and some other keywords to the search, such as “scam” or “rip off” or “court.”

    For example, if we wanted to find out more about First Rate Construction Company in Metropolis, we would search things like:

    • First Rate Construction Metropolis
    • First Rate Construction scam
    • First Rate Construction sue
    • First Rate Construction court
    • First Rate Construction evil

    These terms can help you discover major complaints about a contractor. But keep in mind, not all complaints are valid. Some people are just crazy.

    What this will do, however, is give you direction about what steps to take next.

    1. Ask for references

    Next, ask the contractor for references from previous people for whom they have worked. Photos are nice, but names and addresses are better.

    Then, do what 90 percent of the population will never do and actually call those references!

    You may want to ask the reference several questions, like:

    1. What work did they do?
    2. How fast did they do it?
    3. Did they keep a clean job site?
    4. You are related to [contractor’s name], right? (If they are, they will think you were already privy to that information and will have no problem answering honestly!)
    5. Any problems working with them?
    6. Would you hire them again?
    7. Can I take a look at the finished product? (This could be in person or via pictures.)

    These questions will help you understand more about the abilities and history of the contractor. Then, if possible, actually check out the work the contractor did and make sure it looks good.

    Another tip recently given to us by J Scott was to ask the contractor to tell you about a recent big job they’ve done. Contractors love to brag about their big jobs, so he or she will likely regale you with the story of how much work they needed to do and how great it looked at the end.

    Find out the address, and then go to the city and verify that a permit was pulled for that project. If not, the contractor did all the work without a permit, which is a good indication they are not a contractor you want on your team.

    1. Verify

    It’s okay to be trusting, but make sure the contractor is worthy of your trust first! To do this, first verify that they truly do have a license to do whatever work you intend for them to do.

    If they are an electrician, make sure they have an electrical license. If they are a plumber, make sure they have a plumbing license. If they are a general contractor, make sure they have a general contractor’s license.

    Next, make sure they do actually have the proper insurance and bond. As we mentioned earlier, you could ask them to bring proof, but you can also simply ask the name of their insurance agent and verify it with that agent. Either way, just make sure they have it.

    Remember: this protects you.

    1. Hire them for one small task

    Before hiring the contractor to do a large project, hire them to do just one small task, preferably under $500 in cost. This will give you a good idea of what kind of work ethic they have and the quality of work that they do.

    If the work is done on time and on budget, and if it meets your quality standards, consider hiring them for more tasks.

    Even if the contractor has passed through the first several steps of this screening process, 75 percent of them will still likely fail at this step, so don’t settle with just one contractor. Hire multiple contractors for multiple small jobs and see who works out the best.

    Related: 14 Killer Questions to Ask Your Contractor

    1. Manage them correctly

    Ninety percent of the time, when I have a disastrous situation with a contractor, the blame lies on no one but myself. If I had managed the job correctly, I wouldn’t be caught in the positions I’ve been in.

    Here’s an example. I hired a contractor to paint a bedroom. He says $500. I say, “Great.”

    He calls me, tells me he’s done, and I send him the $500.

    Now, I go check out the property and what do I see? He didn’t paint the ceiling, despite the obvious need for it. And there are a couple paint splatters on the floor that are easy to clean—but now I have to do it.

    I call the contractor and he says, “Well, you didn’t say I needed to do the ceiling,” and “No, the floor was perfectly clean when I left. Someone else must have made the drips on the floor.”

    Now, you might be saying, “But that’s ridiculous! It’s clearly his fault.”

    But it’s my responsibility to manage him correctly. Therefore, when you work with a contractor, always get a detailed scope of work that clearly lays out 100 percent of what is going to be worked on, what’s included, and what isn’t.

    Then, never pay anything until you’ve inspected the work. On larger jobs, be sure to spread out payments over the course of the job, so they don’t get too much money up front. You always want them hungry for the next paycheck.

    To help with this, I put together a really simple “Contractor Bid Form” over in the BiggerPockets FilePlace—100% free—so you can fill this out every time you work with a contractor. Just go to BiggerPockets.com/bigform.

    The Bottom Line

    Whether you’re a real estate investor like myself or not, you’re going to need to deal with contractors in the future. By following this seven-step process, you’ll save yourself time, stress, and a lot of money.

    Source: BiggerPockets.com by

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    Fix & Flip Overview: How is the current economic environment impacting the market?

     

    Deciding on whether or not to invest in fix-and-flip properties can be tricky, as significant benefits and challenges can influence an investor’s decision. The determinants of a good investment in fix-and-flips include the price you pay for the purchase of the property and the cost of the renovation. An investor must also be aware of the general health of the economy and the location of the property, according to a blog post by Allen Shayanfekr at Sharestates.

    Understanding how the current economic environment impacts the market can help you get the most out of your investments. If the economy is bad, people resist purchasing homes, often opting for rentals instead. If the economy is too good, the competition for fix-and-flip increases, diminishing profits. If a property is in a bad neighborhood, it will be hard to sell while the cost to renovate could outweigh the investment in the property, risking the loss of some or all of the profits.

    To better recognize the potential of a fix-and-flip, Shayanfekr establishes three metrics for ideal conditions when deciding whether or not to move forward on this type of investment property.

    The availability and changes in housing inventory can significantly influence decision-making. Low housing inventory is perfect for house flippers, as home buyers have fewer good options, especially with new homes, creating a higher demand for rehabilitated properties. While some have seen higher housing inventory levels in 2019, others see inventory still in decline. It depends on the location. Either way, keep an eye on inventory levels in 2019.

    Changes in the rate of home purchases also have a strong impact on investment decisions. The market is seeing an influx in homebuying, specifically with first-time home buyers. Though millennials have waited longer than any previous generation to buy homes, we are seeing millennials now buying or planning to buy homes. This upward trend is a good sign that the market will remain steady.

    Fluctuation in the cost of homebuying puts additional pressure on the outcome for investors. Home prices rose 5.6% from January 2018 to January 2019, according to the Federal Housing Finance Agency. The increase in the cost of purchasing homes creates a challenge for many families, often displacing families with few options in future home buying.

    While these metrics may not look great, Shayanfekr recognizes the value of the location as a key to finding a good investment property. CNBC Home Hacks writer Shawn M. Carter establishes the following markets as the top 10 states to invest in:

    • Tennessee
    • Pennsylvania
    • New Jersey
    • Louisiana
    • Colorado
    • Maryland
    • Virginia
    • Florida
    • Illinois
    • Kentucky

    These states have an average ROI of 83-155% and an average flip of 180 days, making them ideal markets for fix-and-flip investments.

    With the market in constant flux, it’s important to keep in mind that just because one market goes south, it doesn’t mean that another location or market can’t offer good opportunities. If fix-and-flip isn’t looking like a sound investment, rental properties are another area that is growing. Whichever direction you choose, remember to asset class diversification is key to building a profitable investment portfolio.

    Source: Mortgage Professionals America – Ryan Rose 04 Jun 2019

     

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    How to ‘plan, invest and retire wealthy’

    What if condo investing were as easy as owning a mutual fund? Well, it can be.

    Connect Asset Management will be at the Investor Forum on March 2 to explain how it helps its clients turn one property into several and build portfolios that cash flow millions of dollars. One of the ways in which Connect Asset Management does that is by helping investor clients access to some of the most exclusive real estate developments in Ontario.

    “We help investors plan, invest and retire wealthy with cash flow in condos,” said real estate broker and founder of Connect Asset Management Ryan Coyle. “It’s completely hands-off for our clients; we make investing in real estate as easy as owning a mutual fund.”

    Connect Asset Management builds a strategy for its clients predicated on timing—that is, strategically choosing when to purchase a property.

    “From acquisition to completion, there’s a tremendous amount of growth on capital appreciation and rental appreciation, so when the condo is built they have all this appreciation that gives them the ability to refinance, pull out the equity and buy more property,” said Coyle. “We help our clients identify the optimal time to flow that capital into more properties.”

    The strategy, which Connect Asset Management will decode at the Investor Forum, is called the Multiplier Effect: The ability to use equity in a safe, not to mention lucrative, way. Coyle says that, with the right strategy, anyone can become a millionaire through investing in real estate.

    For starters, ever wonder why the best units in key developments are gone well before sales open to the public?

    “We’ve been a top-producing team for many years now and what that means for us is we get to access all the best developments, and we get our clients first access to all the developments before they open to general public and, quite frankly, before anyone even knows about them,” continued Coyle. “This way, our clients are able to get the best deals on the best units.”

    Condominiums are far from Connect Asset Management’s sole investment strategy. The firm identifies key markets where yields remunerate clients well, and some of them include university towns with high enrollment but meagre student lodgings.

    “Student housing is often referred to as ‘recession-free real estate,’ meaning that when recessions hit student housing tends to be among the strongest real estate because more people go back to school and that increases the demand on both the rental and resale side. The areas we invest in are seeing some of the highest enrollment rates in the country, and Canadian schools have a shortage of on-campus housing, so there’s a new demand for student living, such as condos.”

    Source: Canadian Real Estate Magazine – by Neil Sharma  07 Feb 2019

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