Tag Archives: Florida Real estate

WATCH: Why Being Near Water Could Be the Key to Happiness, According to Research

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Even daydreaming about traveling off to a faraway island, where the sand is warm, and the water is crystal-clear blue can give people a sense of calm. So, this should make it no surprise that actually sitting next to a pristine body of water actually does come with some pretty fantastic well-being benefits.

According to best-selling author and marine biologist Wallace J. Nichols, merely being close to a body of water, be it sea, river, lake, or ocean, promotes mental health and happiness. And he wrote all about it in his book, Blue Mind.

“The term ‘blue mind’ describes the mildly meditative state we fall into when near, in, on or under water,” Nichols told USA Today in 2017. “It’s the antidote to what we refer to as ‘red mind,’ which is the anxious, over-connected and over-stimulated state that defines the new normal of modern life.”

As Nichols noted, research proves his theory that being near water can help us all achieve “an elevated and sustained happiness.”

That elevated level of happiness happens because, according to Nichols, water helps in “lowering stress and anxiety, increasing an overall sense of well-being and happiness, a lower heart and breathing rate, and safe, better workouts. Aquatic therapists are increasingly looking to the water to help treat and manage PTSD, addiction, anxiety disorders, autism and more.”

Perhaps this is why we are all willing to pay more for a house along the water, or a room with an ocean view.

Moreover, being near water can increase our creativity, including our conversational abilities. But, being near water doesn’t only help us during our waking hours. It can help us in our sleep, too.

“There is some research that says people may sleep better when they are adjacent to nature,” W. Christopher Winter, M.D., author of The Sleep Solution, told Conde Nast Traveler. “No wonder sleep machines always feature the sounds of rain, the ocean, or a flowing river.”

And this gift of Mother Nature’s to soothe us all with a simple drop of water is precisely why Nichols believes it’s so important to protect this precious gift.

Source: SouthernLiving.com – By Stacey Leasca July 19, 2018

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Fix & Flip Overview: How is the current economic environment impacting the market?

 

Deciding on whether or not to invest in fix-and-flip properties can be tricky, as significant benefits and challenges can influence an investor’s decision. The determinants of a good investment in fix-and-flips include the price you pay for the purchase of the property and the cost of the renovation. An investor must also be aware of the general health of the economy and the location of the property, according to a blog post by Allen Shayanfekr at Sharestates.

Understanding how the current economic environment impacts the market can help you get the most out of your investments. If the economy is bad, people resist purchasing homes, often opting for rentals instead. If the economy is too good, the competition for fix-and-flip increases, diminishing profits. If a property is in a bad neighborhood, it will be hard to sell while the cost to renovate could outweigh the investment in the property, risking the loss of some or all of the profits.

To better recognize the potential of a fix-and-flip, Shayanfekr establishes three metrics for ideal conditions when deciding whether or not to move forward on this type of investment property.

The availability and changes in housing inventory can significantly influence decision-making. Low housing inventory is perfect for house flippers, as home buyers have fewer good options, especially with new homes, creating a higher demand for rehabilitated properties. While some have seen higher housing inventory levels in 2019, others see inventory still in decline. It depends on the location. Either way, keep an eye on inventory levels in 2019.

Changes in the rate of home purchases also have a strong impact on investment decisions. The market is seeing an influx in homebuying, specifically with first-time home buyers. Though millennials have waited longer than any previous generation to buy homes, we are seeing millennials now buying or planning to buy homes. This upward trend is a good sign that the market will remain steady.

Fluctuation in the cost of homebuying puts additional pressure on the outcome for investors. Home prices rose 5.6% from January 2018 to January 2019, according to the Federal Housing Finance Agency. The increase in the cost of purchasing homes creates a challenge for many families, often displacing families with few options in future home buying.

While these metrics may not look great, Shayanfekr recognizes the value of the location as a key to finding a good investment property. CNBC Home Hacks writer Shawn M. Carter establishes the following markets as the top 10 states to invest in:

  • Tennessee
  • Pennsylvania
  • New Jersey
  • Louisiana
  • Colorado
  • Maryland
  • Virginia
  • Florida
  • Illinois
  • Kentucky

These states have an average ROI of 83-155% and an average flip of 180 days, making them ideal markets for fix-and-flip investments.

With the market in constant flux, it’s important to keep in mind that just because one market goes south, it doesn’t mean that another location or market can’t offer good opportunities. If fix-and-flip isn’t looking like a sound investment, rental properties are another area that is growing. Whichever direction you choose, remember to asset class diversification is key to building a profitable investment portfolio.

Source: Mortgage Professionals America – Ryan Rose 04 Jun 2019

 

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How Much You Need to Earn to Buy a Home in America Today

Seven years after the U.S. housing market bottomed in February 2012, the market has staged a dramatic recovery. U.S. housing prices are now about 11 percent higher than their 2006 peak, according to the latest S&P/Case-Shiller U.S. National Home Price Index data.

National Averages

While that surge in home prices is great for homeowners, it’s made it difficult for homebuyers, particularly younger buyers in large cities where the real estate market is hottest.

To make matters worse, rising interest rates have pushed mortgage rates higher than they’ve been in years, creating yet another obstacle for buyers. HSH.com recently compiled a list of the most- and least-affordable U.S. metro housing markets. The list incorporates median housing prices, interest, taxes and insurance payments and is ranked by the salary a homebuyer would need to afford the average home in each market.

On a national level, the salary needed to comfortably afford a home is $61,453, according to HSH.com. That estimate is based on an average mortgage rate of 4.9 percent on a median home price of $257,600. That average home price is up 3.95 percent from a year ago. The average monthly mortgage payment is around $1,433.

Least Affordable Markets

Of course, some markets are much pricier than the national average. The following are the top five most expensive housing markets:

San Jose, California

  • Median home price: $1.25 million
  • Year-over-year change: -1.5 percent
  • Monthly payment: $5,946
  • Salary required: $254,835

San Francisco, California

  • Median home price: $952,200
  • Year-over-year change: +3.5 percent
  • Monthly payment: $4,642
  • Salary required: $198,978

San Diego, California

  • Median home price: $626,000
  • Year-over-year change: +2.6 percent
  • Monthly payment: $3,071
  • Salary required: $131,640

Los Angeles, California

  • Median home price: $576,100
  • Year-over-year change: +4.1 percent
  • Monthly payment: $2,873
  • Salary required: $123,156

Boston, Massachusetts

  • Median home price: $460,300
  • Year-over-year change: +2.6 percent
  • Monthly payment: $2,491
  • Salary required: $106,789

Most Affordable Markets

If these numbers are enough to make the average American earner dizzy, there are also plenty of metro housing markets around the country that are much more affordable. The following are the five most affordable cities to buy a house, according to HSH.com:

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

  • Median home price: $141,625
  • Year-over-year change: +4.9 percent
  • Monthly payment: $878
  • Salary required: $36,659

Cleveland, Ohio

  • Median home price: $150,100
  • Year-over-year change: +6.9 percent
  • Monthly payment: $943
  • Salary required: $40,437

Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

  • Median home price: $161,000
  • Year-over-year change: +5.3 percent
  • Monthly payment: $964
  • Salary required: $41,335

Memphis, Tenessee

  • Median home price: $174,000
  • Year-over-year change: +4.3 percent
  • Monthly payment: $966
  • Salary required: $41,400

Indianapolis, Indianapolis

  • Median home price: $185,200
  • Year-over-year change: +7.4 percent
  • Monthly payment: $986
  • Salary required: $42,288

Millennials Getting Burned

In addition to paying higher prices for homes, a recent survey by Bankrate suggests that millennials are being too hasty about jumping into the market. One in three millennials under the age of 35 own a home, but 63 percent of those young homeowners admitted to having regrets about the home they purchased.

The biggest source of buyer’s remorse for millennial homeowners is underestimating the amount of hidden costs associated with owning a home. Insurance costs, property taxes and closing costs can add up to between 2 and 5 percent of the total value of the home, but many buyers don’t consider these fees when shopping for homes.

Homeowners should also set aside at least 1 percent of the value of the home each year for repairs and maintenance, according to HGTV.

In addition to paying too much, nearly 1-in-5 (18 percent) of millennial homeowners regret not buying a larger house.

 

Source: News Republic – March 11, 2019 

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How to ‘plan, invest and retire wealthy’

What if condo investing were as easy as owning a mutual fund? Well, it can be.

Connect Asset Management will be at the Investor Forum on March 2 to explain how it helps its clients turn one property into several and build portfolios that cash flow millions of dollars. One of the ways in which Connect Asset Management does that is by helping investor clients access to some of the most exclusive real estate developments in Ontario.

“We help investors plan, invest and retire wealthy with cash flow in condos,” said real estate broker and founder of Connect Asset Management Ryan Coyle. “It’s completely hands-off for our clients; we make investing in real estate as easy as owning a mutual fund.”

Connect Asset Management builds a strategy for its clients predicated on timing—that is, strategically choosing when to purchase a property.

“From acquisition to completion, there’s a tremendous amount of growth on capital appreciation and rental appreciation, so when the condo is built they have all this appreciation that gives them the ability to refinance, pull out the equity and buy more property,” said Coyle. “We help our clients identify the optimal time to flow that capital into more properties.”

The strategy, which Connect Asset Management will decode at the Investor Forum, is called the Multiplier Effect: The ability to use equity in a safe, not to mention lucrative, way. Coyle says that, with the right strategy, anyone can become a millionaire through investing in real estate.

For starters, ever wonder why the best units in key developments are gone well before sales open to the public?

“We’ve been a top-producing team for many years now and what that means for us is we get to access all the best developments, and we get our clients first access to all the developments before they open to general public and, quite frankly, before anyone even knows about them,” continued Coyle. “This way, our clients are able to get the best deals on the best units.”

Condominiums are far from Connect Asset Management’s sole investment strategy. The firm identifies key markets where yields remunerate clients well, and some of them include university towns with high enrollment but meagre student lodgings.

“Student housing is often referred to as ‘recession-free real estate,’ meaning that when recessions hit student housing tends to be among the strongest real estate because more people go back to school and that increases the demand on both the rental and resale side. The areas we invest in are seeing some of the highest enrollment rates in the country, and Canadian schools have a shortage of on-campus housing, so there’s a new demand for student living, such as condos.”

Source: Canadian Real Estate Magazine – by Neil Sharma  07 Feb 2019

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How To Buy Foreclosures at Auction

 

Sales of distressed homes usually come in several forms. First, there are short sales or pre-foreclosures, deals where an owner who can no longer afford the property tries to work out a purchase with a buyer, subject to the approval of the lender. If that doesn’t work, the lender may start foreclosure proceedings, and the home may be put up for sale at a public auction. If the highest bid at the auction is insufficient, the lender then gets title to the property and holds it as a bank-owned (or REO) property.

The purpose of a foreclosure auction is to get the highest possible price for the property, in order to mitigate the losses a lender suffers when a borrower defaults on a loan. If the sale amount covers the outstanding mortgage debt and various foreclosure costs, then any surplus goes to the borrower. Bidders, on the other hand, are looking for investment bargains, so many homes sold at foreclosure auctions ultimately sell at something of a discount compared to traditional properties.

Preparing for a Foreclosure Auction

Foreclosure auctions differ substantially from a typical residential sale. There are no terms to discuss, no haggling over paint or appliances. The property is sold as is, where it is, and with any existing faults and limitations. The property may be sold on an absolute basis (the highest bid wins, even if it’s for a tiny amount) or with a reserve or minimum bid (the property has to sell for at least a given price, otherwise the lender gets title).

The condition of the property may range from wonderful to awful, and it may or may not be occupied. Some properties are “zombie foreclosures,” a situation where the borrower has abandoned the property before the foreclosure has been completed. In all cases, bidders should review disclosures with care and seek as much information as possible about the property.

It’s important to visit the property before the auction, if you can, especially if you live locally. Does it seem occupied or not? How does the exterior condition appear? Be aware that trespassing and Peeping Tom rules may limit access unless you’re invited onto the property. Some bidders drive by the property just before the auction to ensure that its condition hasn’t changed since the disclosure papers were written. In some cases, you may be able to see a virtual tour or even attend an open house.

Lastly, real estate values are related to local economies. How much would a given property be worth if it was in pristine condition? What rental could you expect? Is there a lot of local sale and rental demand—or a little? Speak with local real estate brokers to better gauge the market.

Your Foreclosure Auction Questions, Answered

As with any real estate purchase, there are a variety of expenses associated with a foreclosure auction. Charges, fees and costs vary widely, so it’s important to understand these expenses before you bid. Here are some questions people often ask about financing and buying a foreclosure at auction:

Before the Auction

Since it’s the lenders that are selling houses, why don’t they just finance the foreclosure sale? That usually doesn’t happen. The division of the lending institution that sells foreclosure properties and the division that does real estate financing are two separate organizations.

Are foreclosures riskier than existing home purchases? It depends on which foreclosure and which existing home. All real estate investing—like all stock market investing—implies some level of risk. But there are some inherent risks involved in buying a foreclosure home—like the inability to do a thorough internal inspection. People who buy these properties hope that the risk will be offset by the kind of discount prices often available on these homes.

Will I have to register to bid? You bet. As with a rental car reservation, you’ll typically have to provide a credit card number and expect the auction company to take a given amount to hold. Why? They want the money in case someone bids and wins, but doesn’t close the deal. How much will be taken out? It depends, so ask the auction company for details.

Will I have to qualify? Yes. The auction company wants to be sure that you have the funds to close the transaction. Most foreclosure auctions are all-cash transactions. The term “all-cash” generally means the ability to put down a deposit immediately after a successful bid and close within a short timeframe.

Do I always need the full amount in cash to buy a foreclosure? This depends to a great degree on the laws in your state. Most foreclosure auctions require payment in cash (or a cashier’s check) within a relatively short time after the auction. Technically, it doesn’t matter if the funds come from you or a lender. What does matter is that successful bidders have the financial ability to close the deal on time and in full. Ask auctioneers about financing and pre-approval requirements.

What’s the best way to learn about auctions before actually buying? Register for auctions and attend the bidding. Learn the mechanics of the auctioning process in your community. Get to know local auctioneers, brokers, attorneys, repair specialists and appraisers who specialize in foreclosures.

During the Auction

Is it better to go to absolute auctions or sales that require minimum bids? People debate this question, but it’s largely a matter of personal preference. With an absolute auction, one bidder will win, while with a reserve sale, it’s possible that no bid will be sufficient. However, if you attend a reserve sale and the lender takes title, then speak with the lender after the auction about an REO purchase. The overwhelming majority of foreclosure sales are conducted using a reserve, since lenders are trying to capture at least a minimum amount of money to offset their losses.

Can I bid $1 more than the next bidder and win the property? Probably not. There are typically minimum bid increments in place.

If I win, do I get title then and there? Not usually. The seller—usually a lender—must approve the bid. Typically, they have 15 days to do so. Once an answer comes through, there’s an additional period required to arrange closing, which may take several weeks.

After the Auction

After closing, do I own the property? In some jurisdictions, there may be an equity of redemption right that allows the borrower who defaulted to regain title to their property under certain conditions. Speak with a local attorney for details before bidding.

Will there be any liens that will become my responsibility after the sale? Most liens are sublimated (or wiped out) by a foreclosure sale. But there are exceptions. Real estate tends to attract liens, so it makes sense to get title insurance for the property with the insurer you prefer.

How much should I set aside for repairs? Each property is unique, so repair requirements can vary widely. Estimating repairs can be difficult because if the property is occupied, the residents may not want visitors. If it’s unoccupied, the utilities may be turned off. The best approach is to get as much information as possible before in the auction. In some cases, you may be able to find utility records that can help you better understand property issues.

What if I have owners or squatters on the property? If the residents won’t move, you may need to contact an attorney who can obtain an eviction notice and arrange for a sheriff to clear the property.

For more details and specifics, you and your broker should contact the auctioneer. Happy bidding!

Source: Auction.com // November 15, 2018 – By Peter Miller

 

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Five Ways To Tell If You’re Cut Out To Be A Landlord

 

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Investing in real estate by purchasing rental properties can be a smart way to balance your portfolio, hedge against inflation and build long-term wealth. Not everyone is cut out to be a landlord, though — but even if you feel you’re not landlord material, you can get the same portfolio benefits by investing in real estate indirectly through a private loan fund or a real estate investment trust. Here are five questions to help determine if investing directly in real estate is right for you.

1. Do you have 20% down payment and 5% to cover repairs and unexpected expenses?

Buying a rental property takes a much bigger down payment than buying a personal residence. Most lenders want at least 20% down, even if the property will generate enough income to pay the mortgage plus expenses like property taxes and hazard insurance. Having another 5% set aside to cover repairs and big-ticket expenses, such as replacing a roof or an HVAC system, may keep you from having to dip into personal funds to pay for unexpected problems.

2. How will you handle renters who don’t pay and the possibility of evicting tenants?

At some point, almost every landlord has to deal with tenants who stop paying rent. Eviction is a financial decision with emotional underpinnings. When tenants don’t pay rent, you still have to pay the mortgage, the property taxes, the water bill and all the other holding costs. But sometimes, nonpaying tenants are families with children or have unexpected circumstances like a serious illness or accident occur, leaving them unable to pay rent. If it’s too emotionally taxing to handle the eviction yourself, you can hire an attorney to represent you in court and movers to remove the tenants’ possessions from the property. Before becoming a landlord, you should know that the possibility of evicting a tenant might become a reality.

3. How do you feel about other people using your stuff?

Landlords hold security deposits because damage happens. Carpets get stained, hardwood floors get scratched and there is a fair amount of general wear and tear that should be expected in and on your property. As long as the cost to repair damages doesn’t exceed the security deposit, there shouldn’t be an issue. The real question becomes, what happens when the cost of repairs required exceed the security deposit? How will you confront your tenant to address these issues?  If contemplating this (somewhat common) scenario is stressful, becoming a landlord may not be an optimal option for you.

4. Can you wait at least 15 years for your investment to pay off?

Real estate is a long-term investment for a couple of reasons. First, the transaction costs are high. Real estate sales commissions, state and local transfer taxes, appraisals and settlement costs all reduce your resale profit. Second, the length of your mortgage dictates the monthly payment. The longer your keep your mortgage, the lower the monthly payment.

 

Source: Forbes – Bobby Montagne, CEO of Walnut Street Finance

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The 4 Key Trends Home Buyers and Sellers Should Watch in 2019

 | Nov 28, 2018

We’re entering the home stretch of 2018, when you can actually say, “See you next year!” to someone you’ll see in just a few weeks. It’s a time to look ahead, to make new plans, to achieve new dreams.

And if those dreams include buying your own home, you should keep an eye on the ever-changing tides of the housing market. Now, markets are like the weather: You can’t entirely predict how they will act, but you canget a sense of the forces that will push things in one direction or another.

The realtor.com® economic research team analyzed a wealth of housing data to come up with a forecast of what 2019 might hold for home buyers and sellers—and it looks like both groups are going to be facing some challenges.

Here are the top four takeaways. For more information, see the full realtor.com® 2019 forecast.

1. We’ll have more homes for sale, especially luxury ones

We’ve been chronicling the super-tight inventory of homes for sale for several years now. Yes, homes have been hitting the market, but not enough to keep up with the demand. Nationwide, inventory actually hit its lowest level in recorded history last winter, but this year it finally started to recover. We’re expecting to see that inventory growth continue into next year, but not at a blockbuster rate—less than 7%.

While this is welcome news for buyers who’ve been sidelined, sellers must confront a new reality.

“More inventory for sellers means it’s not going to be as easy as it has been in past years—it means they will have to think about the competition,” says Danielle Halerealtor.com‘s chief economist.

“It’s still going to be a very good market for sellers,” she adds, “but if they’ve had their expectations set by listening to stories of how quickly their neighbor’s home sold in 2017 or in 2018, they may have to adjust their expectations.”

Although next year’s inventory growth is expected to be modest nationwide, pricier markets will tell a different story. In these markets—which typically have strong economies (read: high-paying jobs)—most of the expected inventory growth will come from listings of luxury homes.

We’re expecting to see the biggest increases in high-end inventory in the metro areas of San Jose, CASeattle, WAWorcester, MABoston, MA; and Nashville, TN. All of those metro markets, which may include neighboring towns, could see double-digit gains in inventory in 2019.

2. Affording a home will remain tough

It’s no secret that home sellers have been sitting pretty for the past several years. But is the tide about to change in buyers’ favor?

“In some ways, life is going to be easier for home buyers; they’ll have more options,” Hale says. “But life is also going to be more difficult for home buyers, because we expect mortgage rates to continue to increase, we expect home prices to continue to increase, so the pinch that they’re feeling from affordability is going to continue to be a pain point moving into 2019.”

Hale predicts that mortgage rates, now hovering around 5%, will reach around 5.5% by the end of 2019. That means the monthly mortgage payment on a typical home listing will be about 8% higher next year, she notes. Meanwhile, incomes are only growing about 3% on average. That double whammy is toughest on first-time home buyers, who tend to borrow the most heavily and who don’t have any equity in a current home to draw on.

3. Millennials will still dominate home buying

Just a few years ago, millennials were the new kids on the block, just barely old enough to buy their own homes. Now they’re the biggest generational group of home buyers, accounting for 45% of mortgages (compared with 17% for baby boomers and 37% for Gen Xers). Some of them are even moving on up from their starter homes.

As we mentioned above, things will be tough for those first-time buyers. But the slightly older move-up buyers will reap the benefits of both their home equity and the increased choices in the market.

And regardless of whether they’re part of that younger set starting a career or the older set that’s starting a family, “they’re going to be more price-conscious than any other generation,” says Ali Wolf, director of economic research at Meyers Research.

That’s because they typically are still carrying student debt and want to be able to spend on experiences, like travel. That takes away from the funds they can put aside for a down payment, or a monthly mortgage payment.

“They want to maintain a certain lifestyle, but they still see the value in owning a home,” Wolf says.

So they might compromise on distance from an urban center, or certain amenities, or space—70% of millennial homeowners own a residence that’s less than 2,000 square feet, Wolf notes.

There’s plenty of time to expand those portfolios, though, as millennials’ housing reign is just beginning: This group is likely to make up the largest share of home buyers for the next decade. The year 2020 is projected to be the peak for millennial home buying—the bulk of them will be age 30.

4. The new tax law is still a wild card

At the time of last year’s forecast, the GOP’s proposed revision of the tax code was still being batted around Congress. While there was talk that it might discourage people from buying a home, no one really knew how it might affect the real-estate market.

This year … well, we still don’t really know. That’s because most taxpayers won’t be filing taxes under the new law until April 2019. And while some people might have a savvy tax adviser giving them a better idea of what’s in store, for many, the reality check will come in the form of a bigger tax bill—or a bigger refund.

Renters are likely to have lower tax bills, but might not be tempted to buy while affordability remains a challenge, and with the new, increased standard deduction reducing the appeal of the homeowner’s mortgage-interest deduction.

“I think the new tax plan will affect mostly homeowners and home buyers in the upper parts of the distribution,” says Andrew Hanson, associate professor of economics at Marquette University in Milwaukee, WI. “Those who either own or are buying higher-priced homes are going to pay a lot more.”

Sellers of those pricier homes will also take a hit, as buyers anticipating bigger tax bills won’t be as willing to pony up for a high list price.

The biggest change resulting from the new tax law, Hanson predicts, will be in mortgages, since people will be less inclined to take out large mortgages.

“If anyone is going to be upset about the tax plan, it’ll be mortgage bankers,” he says.

Source: Realtor.com  –  and Allison Underhill | Nov 28, 2018

Cicely Wedgeworth is the managing editor of realtor.com. She has worked as a writer and editor at Yahoo, the Los Angeles Times, and Newsday.
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