Tag Archives: high-rise living


How to Buy a Toronto Condo in 2018

Whether you’re a first-time buyer or a seasoned investor, there are new rules in 2018 that you will want to understand if you plan to buy a condo in Toronto. In this blog post we are going to explain the new rules and give you some tips to navigate them.

The 2018 condo market at a glance:

How to Buy a Toronto Condo in 2018, average price for condos

What are the new rules and changes?


We spoke with James Harrison, President of Mortgages.ca, to give us a full understanding of what to expect this year.

The new rules are simple:

As of January 1st, 2018, the Bank of Canada’s “Universal Stress Test” is in effect.

The buyer must now qualify for their mortgage based on the 5yr posted rate (4.99% today) or their contracted rate plus 2.00%, whichever is greater.


What does it mean for buyers in 2018?


“In my opinion, this will negatively impact one’s buying power by approximately 15-20% on average,” says James Harrison.

This stress test is an expected addition to the federal government’s measures to limit over-leveraged buyers from entering the housing market. In February of 2016, the federal government raised the minimum down payment from 5% to 10% for properties between $500,000 to $1 million. As we discussed in a previous blog post about those down payment rules and changes, the aim was to “reduce taxpayer exposure and support long-term stability.”

In October of 2016, a first round of stress tests was introduced to target insured mortgages (borrowers with less than 20% down payment). These borrowers were required to qualify at the Bank of Canada’s posted rate, which was 4.64% at the time, in hopes of creating a buffer against over-leveraged home purchases.

The newest round of stress tests is also about creating a buffer zone, but it applies to uninsured mortgages (borrowers with 20% down payment). Effectively, everyone applying for a loan through a regulated lender will now be stress tested. In a previous post, we explained in plain words how your buying power may change under the new mortgage rules.

“This will have a huge impact on some buyers but not all,” says James Harrison. “I believe this will negatively affect first time buyers as they tend to have lower incomes and also carry some debt from school. With one’s buying power negatively affected by 15 to 20% you would think this will mean prices will come down. I would be surprised if prices came down more than 5% in 2018.”

“For the well qualified buyers (those with higher incomes and little to no debt) 2018 will most likely see less competition, which could mean more of a buyer’s market. We have not seen this in a very long time in the GTA.”

“If you purchased a property prior to January 1st, 2018, you can still qualify for a new mortgage based on the old mortgage rules (with some lenders). Some top Brokers may also have lenders that can still qualify clients under the old rules (or at least using the discounted 5 fixed rate of 3.29% for example) and a 25yr amortization. This can increase one’s buying power by about 10- 15%.”

“If a buyer bought a property (same for pre-construction) prior to October 2016 (they could also qualify for an insured mortgage based on the rules prior to the first stress test for insured buyers). This is a huge benefit for some buyers of pre-construction units.”


What to do if you’re not approved for a mortgage under the new rules?


“If a buyer no longer qualifies to purchase a property they want they may have to look for a strong co-borrower to sign on to the mortgage to help increase the income and bring the debt services ratios in line.  Unfortunately, this may mean a lot more potential buyers will now be looking for a rental property, which in itself is already very challenging in Toronto.”

Alternatively, there are mortgage lenders that operate outside The Office of the Superintendent of Financial Institutions (OSFI). The ‘stress-tests’ apply only to lenders that are regulated under OSFI, such as the Big Five banks, while some second-tier banks and credit unions fall outside the new rules. These lenders have often been painted as “shadow lenders,” but they do fill a gap in the home buying process.

For buyers who don’t approve under the new mortgage stress tests, these non-regulated lenders can be a viable option and many of them offer rates competitive with top tier banks. One thing to keep in mind, however, is that non-regulated lenders are still hoping to limit risk, which means they tend to prefer borrowers with strong credit history. If your credit is weak, you may face higher rates on your mortgage. As always, it’s best to do some research.

“It is more important than ever for each and every buyer (or anyone looking for a mortgage) to connect with a very experienced Mortgage Broker. Going to your local bank branch is simply not a smart option anymore and has not been for years, but the new stress test will show this even more. A good Mortgage Broker will be able to help explain this fully and find you more options.  Even if you are a well-qualified buyer you may not qualify with your bank but you may still qualify for excellent schedule A products with another lender.  Do not give up until you speak with a good broker.”


Why is the government implementing these new mortgage rules?


“The reality of these most recent mortgage rules is that the federal government has serious concerns with the level of personal debt loads in Canada. So, they are continuously coming out with ways to help make sure everyone can truly afford the mortgage they are taking on. I personally feel this was too much, and I would not be surprised if the government is forced to pull this back within the next two to three years.”

“I am optimistic that 2018 will still be a strong year in real estate, but realistically a lot of buyers may be out of the market completely. I expect that 2018 will most likely be the year of mom and dad providing the down payment and co-signing for the mortgage as well.”

“I strongly encourage each and every buyer to contact a well-qualified and experienced mortgage broker for all of their mortgage needs, whether it is a purchase, refinance, or renewal.”

Source: Data sourced via Condos.ca on Jan 4, 2018



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GTA’s hottest market outside of downtown Toronto

Source: Canadian Real Estate Wealth –  Neil Sharma

Mississauga has become the GTA’s largest condo hub after Toronto, and its torrid pace of residential, infrastructure and amenity development are conspiring to make it ripe for investment.

In tandem with the Places to Grow Act, Mayor Bonnie Crombie has recalibrated the city’s growth plan to quickly turn it into an urban hub. Mississauga’s city centre already has a dazzling skyline, and it’s expecting 23 new mixed-use condominium towers.

Major builders like Daniels, Amacon, Camrost and Solmar all have major projects going up there that promise to bring life to what’s been a sleepy downtown. However, without a crucial piece of infrastructure, some of these developments might never have been conceived.

“The timing is largely a result of the LRT breaking ground next year,” Crombie told CREW. “It is 20-kilometres long with 22 stops, beginning in Port Credit, and then looping around downtown where there will be four stops. It will pull into the transit terminal – the second-biggest in the GTA – then go into Brampton.”

The city centre in Canada’s six-largest city has long been built around Square One Shopping Centre, which just received a major facelift and extension, but there are newer arrivals. Sheridan College has two campuses in or near the city centre, with a third in planning stages, and University of Toronto Mississauga isn’t very far away, either. Apartment buildings in the area are being outnumbered by condos, and students will naturally rent them.
Over the next two decades, Peel Region is expecting 300,000 new residents and 150,000 jobs, of which 60% are projected to be in Mississauga.

Zia Abbas, owner and president of Realty Point, a brokerage that’s grown to 26 franchises in only two years, says the cost per square foot in Mississauga’s condos make investing there a no-brainer.

“The average of any new launch in downtown Toronto is around $1,000 (per square foot),” he said, “with the cheapest I’ve seen in Liberty Village starting around $850 to $900 per square foot before parking. In Mississauga it’s between $640 and $670, parking included.”

Abbas says the LRT will add substantial value to the city centre’s condo cluster, and added that Mississauga has other hot spots too, like Erin Mills and the Hurontario and Eglinton neighbourhood.

“Compared to downtown Toronto where eight out of 10 people rely on transit infrastructure, in Mississauga it’s five out of 10, I’d say.”

But as Crombie’s vision for an urban Mississauga materializes, that number could start rivalling Toronto’s.

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Map Charts Toronto Condo Prices By Subway Stop

condo prices ttc stop toronto

When it comes to Toronto condo prices, location really is everything. Sure, buying any unit in the city is going to be expensive, but when you see how prices vary based on the TTC subway map, it’s obvious that Line 1 reigns supreme.

Toronto realtor Davelle Morrison recently put together this map of condo prices by TTC stop, which reveals the area around Summerhill Station as the most expensive place in the city. It’s followed closely by Museum, Bay, Bloor-Yonge, and Rosedale as other high cost areas.

condo prices ttc stop toronto

On the flip side, the most reasonable condo prices in Toronto can be found in less dense areas of the city like Scarborough and the eastern portion of North York, which includes stations like Wilson, Sheppard West, and Lawrence West.

Also interesting are the TTC stops that yield no data. The map charts condo prices within 0.3 kilometres of each station, which means that there are plenty of blank entries because there just aren’t condos within the radius under examination.

When you think about it, that’s kind of troubling in terms of Line 2. There are too many stations that lack the kind of density that urban planners laud as key to successful city building.

Source: BlogTo.com  Derek Flack

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What share of GTA condos are flipped? New report offers insight


Soaring price appreciation in the Greater Toronto Area’s high-rise segment is encouraging condo investors to flip their units more rapidly.

So suggests the latest quarterly report from Urbanation, a Toronto-based real estate consulting firm.

This burgeoning trend is reflected in the 9,932 condo units that changed hands in the first quarter, a 73 per cent increase over activity in the first three months last year as well as a quarterly high.

Looking only at units in condo developments that were completed by builders and registered in the last two years, a total of 1,059 transactions were recorded in the first quarter.

In the first quarter of 2016, condo owners sold a total of 625 units in buildings completed throughout the preceding two-year window.

“The shortening of holding periods for some condo buyers is an outcome of the rapidly accelerating market,” says Shaun Hildebrand, senior VP of Urbanation, in a statement.

The average sale price of a resale condo unit in Q1 this year was $510,000, representing a 24 per cent increase over that period last year, according to Urbanation.

“Following the recent strength in condo price appreciation, Urbanation noted an increase in resale activity within newly completed buildings as well as more units transacting twice within shorter timeframes,” the consultancy’s report reads.

In fact, according to past Toronto Real Estate Board numbers, resale condo prices were increasing annually by a far more restrained 9.3 per cent as recently as September 2016.

With year-over-year appreciation well above 20 per cent now, a relatively recent development, it’s easy to see why some recent homebuyers would be compelled to sell sooner.

However, Urbanation’s Hildebrand notes flipping is not widespread — for now.

“Although the share of short-term condo market participants still appears relatively low, it will be important to monitor the situation closely going forward as market conditions evolve,” he adds.

Source: BuzzBuzzHome.com – 

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Buying an unbuilt condo? Think twice, agent says

Being exceedingly careful in one’s condo purchase is never a bad thing, especially in light of the $3-million class action by over a hundred condo owners in Ottawa.

Toronto-based real estate agent David Fleming, who says that he has never been involved in a pre-construction condo transaction in his 13 years as a professional, advocates one simple bit of advice: “Never buy new.”

“I liken it to buying a pair of jeans. If you walked in [to a store] and you couldn’t try them on and didn’t know how long they would be, and what the waist was … that’s a hundred-dollar pair of jeans. So why would someone buy a million-dollar condo the same way?”

The most important aspect that buyers should remember is the fact that they can back out with no penalty, as Ontario provides a 10-day “cooling off” period that can serve as an out for hesitant consumers. The countdown for the 10-day duration starts once the would-be buyer receives a copy of either the disclosure statement or the fully signed purchase and sale agreement, whichever comes later.

Another wise step would be to always hire a lawyer, who should be tasked to review all of the documentation involved in the transaction. If the lawyer suggests amendments to areas of concern, these proposals should be forwarded to the developer.

“If the developer says no, then don’t go ahead with the transaction.”

Fleming also noted that it would be helpful to remember that the people in the showroom are still salespeople who work for the developer, no matter how warm and accommodating they might seem. Working with one’s own real estate agent should help a consumer avoid an ill-advised purchase.

Source; Canadian Real Estate Wealth – by Ephraim Vecina 03 Apr 2017

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How Does Toronto Compare



Source: Genworth Canada

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Condos are king in the GTA


Condo sales were up 79% year-over-year in February and far outstripped home sales for low-rise units.

“In the GTA in February, there were more than twice as many new condo apartments sold (as) low-rise units,” the Building Industry and Land Development Association (BILD) said in its latest report. “Altus Group recorded 3,542 sales of condo apartments in stacked townhouses and mid and high-rise buildings, and 1,541 sales of new detached and semi houses and low-rise townhomes.”

Condo sales more than doubled the ten year average.

Toronto led the way in terms of sales (1,661 units), followed by York (1,299), Peel (370), Halton (107), and Durham (105).

A lack of low-rise supply and, indeed, skyrocketing prices, are the market forces driving many buyers to the condo sector.

“Today in the GTA we have a scarcity of single-family ground-related housing that is not just unprecedented – it is almost inconceivable,” BILD President and CEO Bryan Tuckey said. “As a result we are seeing record breaking condo sales and continued price growth.”

That’s also leading to inventory issues in the condo market.

Units hit a new low in February, dropping to 10,342.

Still, that’s much better than the current availability of single-family homes.

Across the GTA, a mere 1,001 new low-rise homes were available in February. And there were only 324 new detached homes available.

10 years ago there were 17,304 low-rise homes and 12,064 detached homes available.

Source: Canadian Real Estate Wealth – by Justin da Rosa27 Mar 2017

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