Tag Archives: landlords

Thinking of becoming a landlord? Here’s what you need to know

Being a landlord isn’t without its challenges, but covering one’s bases in the following ways is bound to yield quality tenants and rents.

Every real estate professional understands the importance of location, and so should every landlord. Steve Arruda, a sales agent with Century 21 Regal Realty, has been a landlord for 18 years and advises taking one’s time performing due diligence on prospective neighbourhoods.

“You want to know where you’re investing in and what the demographics are in that neighbourhood, and whether there are universities and families there,” Arruda told CREW. “I’ve rented in depressed neighbourhoods, and it’s challenging. The price may seem really tempting, but then you attract a lot of renters who may not have the best incomes, and they could become problematic because there are issues each month with payment. Location is one of the most important things. Make sure you know where you’re investing and what the demographics in that neighbourhood are.”

If investing in a house rather than a condominium, ensure big ticket items like furnaces, wiring, roofs and windows are updated “because those are the things that are quite costly to repair,” added Arruda. “It’s good to have those larger items updated, otherwise if they fail, it’s always at an inopportune time like winter, and you’ll be left with an angry tenant.”

Beyond material concerns, Arruda says landlords invariably become arbiters in disputes between tenants, unfairly or not, and that managing personalities is a delicate art.

“When you have a house with four units, like a multiplex, it’s hard to get everybody to get along, and you’re their first line of defence,” he said. “So, managing personalities, managing expectations and being able to handle that
stress level are crucial, because for an inexperienced landlord, the first call they get because of an issue with a tenant or an issue with a clogged toilet can make their already stressful life even more stressful. Always be prepared for anything, whether issues with tenants or the property itself.”

Additionally, tenants need to be thoroughly screened, and Arruda recommends landlords run their own credit reports and confirm bank statements are real. Even calling an employer to confirm the information provided by potential tenants isn’t beyond the realm of the reasonable. As well, call their previous landlords to find out what kind of people they are.

Over 18 years, Arruda also learned that units with dishwashers, washers and dryers are not only highly sought after, they attract good-quality renters.

Renu Ashdir, a sales agent with iPro Realty Ltd., says clients for whom she seeks rental accommodations flock to buildings with amenities like gyms, but warns too many amenities—especially swimming pools—result in higher condo fees.

“If you’re a person in your 20s and 30s, fitness amenities are the most used,” she said, adding older tenants prefer the security of a concierge. “People care about the kind of neighbours they have in a building and whether or not there’s transit nearby.”

Most importantly, says Arruda, “Look after your renters and know rental laws.”

Source: Canadian Real Estate Wealth – by Neil Sharma12 Jan 2018
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5 ways to tame your landlord

 

Here’s how to keep the ‘lord’ out of your landlord

It’s the age-old question: Should you rent or buy? With housing prices still sky-high in Vancouver and Toronto, many are looking towards renting as a permanent solution. Michael Thiele, an Ottawa-based lawyer, suspects the new minimum down payment rules are pushing even more people to rent, making it a landlord’s market. Here’s how to keep the ‘lord’ out of your ‘landlord’.

1. Make your case

If you point out to your landlord that something needs fixing, make sure you get it in writing. That way, if it goes unrepaired, forcing you to take the case to a tenancy board, you have evidence that the landlord was told. Keeping pictures of the unrepaired area is also important, says Karen Andrews, a lawyer with Advocacy Tenant Centre of Ontario. A successful case may result in a reduction in rent, if the tenant can make the case that they’re not getting what they are paying for.

2. Knock first

“Tenants have to be careful that they are covered by their provincial tenancy legislation,” says Thiele. For instance, shared apartments or renting a room in someone’s house may not be covered. To be sure, call your provincial tenant’s board.

3. ‘No girls allowed’ is not allowed

So you see a sweet apartment that you’d like to rent, but notice the listing forbids people of your gender or race? The law is clear: If it’s considered discrimination under the Human Rights Code, it’s forbidden for the landlord to do it. That includes rejecting you based on sex, age, religion or marital status.

4. Law trumps lease

Rental agreements and leases don’t reign supreme in the renting realm. It’s tenancy law, not contract law, that matters, explains Andrew Sakamoto, executive director of the Tenant Resource and Advisory Centre. Next time you see something unfair in your rental agreement, check with a free community legal clinic to see if it’s allowed under provincial legislation.

5. Heat, please

There’s a requirement to maintain heating, but not for providing air conditioning. Still, if there is air conditioning, it can’t be taken away, as the landlord is also expected to maintain the services that were provided when the tenant moved in.

Source; Money Sense – by 

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8 Things You Should Always Do Before Signing A Lease

things to do while apartment hunting

Make sure you know the full picture before you move in with all your stuff.

Finding the perfect rental can be a challenging process— scouring listings, cramming multiple viewings into a single day, and feeling like your ideal place is a needle in a haystack. So it’s understandable to quickly pull the trigger when you find that dream home in the perfect neighborhood with a reasonable monthly rent.

But before you sign on the dotted line for the keys to that perfect apartment for rent in Dallas, TX, there are some things to keep in mind. Pay attention to these 8 details, and you’re bound to be a happy camper once you’re all moved in.

8 Steps All Renters Should Take Before Signing a Lease:

  1. Read the entire lease

    Reading your entire lease will help prevent simple problems from popping up. But you can take this one step further and make sure you’re signing the right lease for your city or state. Ordinances vary by city and state, so be sure to call your local government to find out local regulations for landlord-tenant law. Fortunately, there are nonprofit renters’ rights organizations in most major cities, so a quick phone call can help make sure you’re on the right track.

  2. Remember: It’s a partnership

    The landlord-tenant relationship can be friendly, especially if it gets off to a good start. Present yourself well on viewing day and be as polite and professional as you would be for a job interview. They are probably showing the property to many prospective tenants — and you want to stand out in all the right ways. Also remember that as much as your landlord is trusting you with their property, you are trusting them to maintain a safe and healthy living environment. Don’t be afraid to ask questions or request repairs and note the response. If they’re not willing to hear your concerns or write repairs into the lease, it could foretell problems down the road.

  3. Visit the apartment at different times of day

    Maybe the master bedroom gets gorgeous morning sunlight — but also sits right under a street lamp, throwing off even the best sleeper’s circadian rhythms. (Potential solution: blackout shades!) Visiting a unit more than once and at different hours will help you get a better sense of the space, from changing noise levels to noting the best hours for soaking up the rays. And while it’s not possible to stretch out your visits over multiple seasons, it’s always a good idea to ask the landlord about the apartment under different weather conditions. He or she may be able to prepare you for a loud radiator come winter or give you the scoop on a lifesaving cross-breeze during the summer months.

  4. Ask about alterations (no matter how small)

    Most lease agreements will specify what changes you’re allowed to make to an apartment, but it’s always a good idea, before signing, to get specific. Whether you’re hoping to install patio stones in the backyard or just put some nails in the wall, be sure to bring up those enhancements at the first viewing. Landlords can differ greatly in what customization they will allow; taking it for granted that you can “make your rental home your own” could put your security deposit at risk. And if there are things you feel compromise the safety or integrity of the apartment, have your landlord agree — in writing — to make those repairs.

  5. Understand the rules for subletting

    Subletting can be a great option for renters who might need to move out early. Maybe you’re renting while planning to buy, and your dream home comes along mid-lease, or a job unexpectedly takes you to a new state. Subletting can help you avoid breaking your lease by letting someone else pay out the remaining months — but make sure your landlord allows it or would consider an exception to the rule. Penalties for subletting can range from a hefty fine to eviction, so best to be in the clear before passing off the keys to another renter.

  6. Ask what’s included (and be clear on what isn’t)

    Utilities and other hidden costs can add up if they’re not included in the monthly rent. Even if you determine that the basics like gas and electric come with the rental, be sure to ask about hidden fees like garbage pickup, on-site parking, or monthly pet fees. Or if the property hosts an on-site gym or free laundry, factor those savings into your household budget. If no utilities are included, try to get a ballpark idea of what they might cost and budget accordingly. Asking a neighbor or the previous tenant can help give you an idea of what others spend.

  7. Talk to your new neighbors

    Get to know your neighbors, even before you sign. If they’re in the same building, you can get an expert opinion on the ins and outs of your prospective rental. They can let you know what utilities usually cost, weigh in on the dependability of your landlord or property management company, and tell you what to expect from the neighborhood. Ask how long they’ve lived in their apartment: It’s a good sign if your neighbor has found reason to renew their yearly lease. Neighbors can be good for so much more than a borrowed cup of sugar!

  8. Have your papers in order

    Competitive rental markets like New York, NY, and San Francisco, CA, often see many qualified candidates vying for the same apartment. In these cases, the most crucial thing you can do before signing a lease is to be 100% prepared. Having your paperwork ready to go with your application will expedite the process and increase your chances of signing that lease.

Is there anything you wish you’d asked a landlord before signing on the dotted line?

 

Source: Trulia.com – By Christine Stulik | Apr 12, 2017

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Landlord licensing needed to fix ‘unacceptable’ conditions for low-income renters, report says

Cheryl Horne points out a hole in the bathroom of her Scarborough apartment that has gone unfixed for five years.

ACORN surveyed 174 low-income tenants about conditions in their units

Cheryl Horne is paying more than $1,000 each month for cockroaches, broken cupboards, an unsealed door that lets cold air in and gaping holes in her walls and ceilings. And her rent is about to go up.

The single mother of five calls the conditions of her Scarborough apartment “ridiculous.”

“It’s hard. It’s driving me mad,” Horne said. “But there’s nothing to do. I have to just live with it,” she said in an interview with CBC News in her unit at 3967 Lawrence Ave. E., which is near Orton Park Road.

A new report released by ACORN, a national organization of low and moderate income families, says the plight of tenants like Horne highlights the need for the city to move forward on landlord licensing.

Their State of Repair survey was distributed to 174 ACORN members across the city to measure the extent of substandard living conditions in Toronto’s rental apartments. Results reveal the majority of tenants have major deficiencies in their homes.

Cheryl Horne Acorn report door

Cheryl Horne said the hole in her door is making her feel unsafe in her Scarborough apartment. (Laura DaSilva/CBC )

Andrew Marciniak, a lead organizer at ACORN Toronto, spoke on CBC’s Metro Morning about the severity of the situation.

“People are living in squalor and paying high rent,” he said.

Of the members surveyed, 95 per cent reported violations of Toronto’s property standard bylaws in their apartments and nearly 70 percent said repairs were needed in their unit the day they moved in.

Marciniak said that cockroaches rank among the most common complaints.

“83 per cent of people say they have seen cockroaches in their home, and about a third say they see them every day,” he said.

In addition, half of respondents lack heat in winter and a quarter have mold in their apartments. Marciniak said that bed bugs, poor ventilation and faulty elevators also plague about a quarter of the tenants that were surveyed.

Basic repairs seen as hurdle

ACORN wants the City of Toronto to implement mandatory annual inspections of all buildings with three or more floors and more than 10 units. The program would be similar to the DineSafe restaurant licensing system. Landlords that fail the inspections would face large fines.

“That would teach them a lesson,” Horne said. “They live happy wherever they live and they own a building. Why can’t they make people happy the same way?”

Getting basic repairs done is a hurdle nearly 70 percent of respondents said they struggle with.

Horne said numerous written requests to her landlord have gone unfulfilled.

Although there is a complaint system for tenants through the city’s 311 system, nearly one third of respondents said they see no point in calling.

‘I’m not going to keep silent’

“Because they’re afraid,” Horne said. “A lot of people are complaining about it, but they’re keeping silent. I’m not going to keep silent.”

Horne said her building manager sends maintenance workers who are not qualified to do repairs, and they often make them worse. “You can’t bring people in to do the work of electrician or plumber that don’t have a licence,” she said. “You have to bring professional people.”

ACORN has been pushing for a policy to ensure landlords face the same scrutiny as other business owners in Toronto.

“We’d like to see landlord licensing,” said Marciniak. “Also, an engagement program for tenants so they know their rights and they know the city is looking out for them.”  

In June, Toronto city council voted 33-6 to ask municipal licensing staff to start public consultations on a plan to crack down on bad landlords.

ACORN Canada president Marva Burnett said ACORN members will be at city hall over the next two months as city council reviews a staff report to ensure any new program is the best one possible.

“Toronto city council and Mayor John Tory have a golden opportunity to leave a legacy and ensure all tenants live in a healthy home,” Burnett said in a statement.

Source: By Laura DaSilva, CBC News Posted: Nov 01, 2016 8:00 AM ET

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Architecture for the ages

Architects Janna Levitt and Dean Goodman designed a house that could easily shift to accommodate children, future renters and, one day, their golden years.

Architects Janna Levitt and Dean Goodman designed a house that could easily shift to accommodate children, future renters and, one day, their golden years.

Young adults are getting squeezed out of the housing market. Their parents, meanwhile, want to downsize without leaving familiar neighbourhoods. The solution couldn’t be simpler to a growing group of designers: Rethink (and rebuild) the family home to suit several generations for the long haul.

When a strange young man entered her bedroom, Kelly Rossiter wasn’t entirely surprised. “He had had a bit too much to drink,” says Rossiter, who lives in Toronto, “and had gotten lost on the way to the front door.”

On the way, that is, from a party at her daughter’s place; Rossiter and her husband Lloyd Alter live below their daughter Emma, now 28, in a 1913 house that’s been split into two apartments. The door that links the suites in their home is usually left unsecured. “But after that night, I began locking the door whenever she had a party,” Rossiter says.

That incursion was a “rare hiccup” for the three family members, who occupy the same house that Alter, 63, and Rossiter, 57, have inhabited since 1984. Recently, instead of trading it for a condo in another area, they hired David Colussi of Workshop Architecture to divide the rambling building into a duplex. Now they live in a suite in the first floor and basement; Emma is upstairs with her fiancé and a roommate.

Janna Levitt and Dean Goodman designed their family home so that part of it could be converted into a rental when their children moved out.

Janna Levitt and Dean Goodman designed their family home so that part of it could be converted into a rental when their children moved out.

 

Janna Levitt and Dean Goodman designed their family home so that part of it could be converted into a rental when their children moved out.

 

Like a growing number of Canadians approaching retirement, Alter and Rossiter have taken a creative approach to the architecture of the “empty nest.” Rapidly rising housing prices – particularly in Toronto and Vancouver – are squeezing the middle-class expectation of home ownership for young adults. At the same time, their parents, people such as Alter and Rossiter, are not always eager to move into apartment living or to give up on the advantages of a familiar neighbourhood.

Rather than moving house, why not reshape our houses to fit us?

Such adaptability can be built into a house’s architecture. One example is the Grange Triple Double, a house by Williamson Chong Architects: Their clients, a Toronto couple in their 30s with a young son, decided to move in with the husband’s parents. They built a bespoke house that would accommodate them all together with rental income – and then change, multiple times, as the family’s needs evolve through the decades.

“The ingredients for this kind of house,” explains partner Betsy Williamson of Williamson Chong, “are spaces that are discrete yet flexible.”

The Triple Double, at about 3,200 square feet plus basement, sits on a corner; it is a three-bedroom, three-bath home which spills across three levels – and abuts rental space located on the ground floor and in the basement. The tenant space can be configured as one or two apartments; half or all of it can also be joined to the main house with the removal of cabinets or wall sections. In addition, one of the house’s bedrooms can be closed off as a semi-private area for the older residents. In time, the architects imagine that the house could take many different configurations; for instance, one or both of the grandparents might move into the main floor rental space.

The Grange Triple Double, a house by Williamson Chong Architects, was designed and built to change, multiple times, as the owners' needs evolve through the decades.

 

The Grange Triple Double, a house by Williamson Chong Architects, was designed and built to change, multiple times, as the owners' needs evolve through the decades.

 

The Grange Triple Double, a house by Williamson Chong Architects, was designed and built to change, multiple times, as the owners’ needs evolve through the decades.

 

From the architects’ point of view, such adaptability is fairly easy to design. The house’s heating and ventilation systems can be separately controlled in each of three potential units; extra sound insulation provides a buffer of privacy. But the biggest consideration is, as Williamson explains it, a matter of space. “You need rooms,” she says. “You need rooms that are closed off that can be opened up to each other.”

This logic can be applied to houses that don’t have the scale or the unusual geometry of the Triple Double project. Janna Levitt and Dean Goodman of LGAArchitectural Partners, who are married and have two children, designed their own house a decade ago, when they were in their early 50s. “When we moved in, we had teenagers,” Goodman explains, “so we tried to figure out, what kind of house would work for that age of our family and what would work after that?”

‘It’s important to think about what you’re building for,’ Goodman says, ‘not just right now, but in the longer term. And how much longer?’

‘It’s important to think about what you’re building for,’ Goodman says, ‘not just right now, but in the longer term. And how much longer?’

 

‘It’s important to think about what you’re building for,’ Goodman says, ‘not just right now, but in the longer term. And how much longer?’

 

The first need was privacy: Their kids wanted their own space, and they got it in the basement, which is high (the windows start three feet off the ground) and has two bedrooms, a bathroom and a living room, plus generous windows.

That basement has room and the plumbing rough-ins for a kitchen; it also has a space for a front door and staircase which is, for now, buried under soil in the garden. (“We thought, if we give the kids their own door when they are 14 or 15 years old, we’ll never see them,” Goodman explains.) Now the kids have moved out, and the couple is preparing to rent that space out, providing a source of income.

And the upper levels, with about 1,600 square feet, two bedrooms, are still larger than the average Canadian house of 50 years ago. Goodman says he and Levitt are happy to reduce their ecological footprint, and simply don’t need any more space.

There is a lesson in this: Design matters. Levitt and Goodman are excellent architects, and their house is efficiently planned to be comfortable and adaptable despite its relatively modest size. “It’s important to think about what you’re building for,” Goodman says, “not just right now, but in the longer term. And how much longer?”

The upper levels of Levitt and Goodman's house, with about 1,600 square feet, are still larger than the average Canadian house of 50 years ago.

The upper levels of Levitt and Goodman's house, with about 1,600 square feet, are still larger than the average Canadian house of 50 years ago.

 

The upper levels of Levitt and Goodman’s house, with about 1,600 square feet, are still larger than the average Canadian house of 50 years ago.

 

That raises the question of old age and a potential loss of physical mobility. Levitt and Goodman will live, still, on two levels; this goes against the emerging wisdom of “retirement communities,” in which people are choosing to retire to houses that are often on one level and wheelchair-accessible. Kelly Rossiter and Lloyd Alter have likewise chosen to live on two floors.

But is that even a problem? Alter, who is a writer on design and sustainability and an adjunct professor at Ryerson University, argues passionately that being located in a walkable neighbourhood, served by transit and connected to neighbours, is what matters as one ages.

“Older people, when they move into single-family houses in subdivisions, they’re setting themselves up for failure,” he says. “It’s a hell of a lot likelier that they’ll lose their keys before they lose their ability to walk up the stairs.

“This is one solution: this re-intensification of our neighbourhoods.”

Levitt and Goodman plan to live on two levels into retirement.

Levitt and Goodman plan to live on two levels into retirement.

 

Levitt and Goodman plan to live on two levels into retirement.

 

As Alter correctly points out, the conversion of houses into apartments (and back again) is nothing new – especially in Toronto, where such ad hoc adaptations have always provided a major portion of the city’s rental housing. But for upper-middle-class families, they now make sense. “Now we’re going into a generational change where the kids don’t have enough money,” Alter says, “and the parents have the house and don’t need it.

That idea drives much of the business for the Vancouver design-build firm Lanefab, which specializes in energy-efficient laneway houses. Since the city made zoning changes in 2009 to allow such projects (small new houses in the backyards of existing houses), the firm has worked with clients who are house-rich, aging, and ready to simplify their lives.

“If you’ve got an 80-year-old house in Vancouver, being able to move into a new building that’s energy-efficient – that’s appealing,” says Lanefab’s Mat Turner. “They can stay in their neighbourhood, in a house that’s custom-designed for them.”

This sort of promising equation may be enough to break some middle-class expectations about dwelling and family. Alter and Rossiter, with their upstairs-downstairs living in Toronto, are finding that their friends love the idea. “People come, they see it, and they say, ‘I’d love to do this,’” Alter reports. “‘If I could ever get my kids to go for it.’”

 

Source: ALEX BOZIKOVIC The Globe and Mail: Thursday, Feb. 25, 2016

Janna Levitt and Dean Goodman designed their family home so that part of it could be converted into a rental when their children moved out.

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A reminder to not take shortcuts

Hefty fines to landlords are a sobering reminder to investors that buildings should be up to code, or they could face the same sort of financial repercussions.

Two landlords in two separate cities are facing substantial fines for building code violations, proving shortcuts can be costly.

A property owner in St. Catherines, Ont., was ordered to pay $8,000 for fire code violations and will also face probation.

“When the court issues a probation order it’s a reflection of the seriousness of the violations,” Fire Chief Dave Wood told local publication, Niagara this Week. “Property owners are responsible for making sure their tenants are safe at home and we have zero tolerance for those who continually neglect their responsibilities. Fire alarms and extinguishers have to work when lives are at risk.”

In a separate case, an Alberta landlord – who had previously been warned about building violations – was fined over $20,000.

In that instance, the owner ignored warnings to address improperly-sized basement windows as well as fire alarm installations.

“All of these things are about minimizing safety risk so someone can escape in case of fire,” Judge Mike Dinkel said during sentencing, according to the Calgary Herald. “The interconnected alarm is so people upstairs can get out. These are pretty crucial things. You don’t want to follow them just to fulfill them, but because they save lives.”

Source: Canadian Real Estate Wealth by Justin da Rosa18 Dec 2015

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How landlords can steer clear of bad tenants

for rent

Any landlord who has been involved in the real estate rental business for more than a few years has likely come across a tenant disaster, or at least knows somebody who has. One of the most common comments we hear from prospective, current, and former landlords relates to the headaches caused by accidentally renting to a bad tenant.

The relationship between landlord and tenant is known to be rocky, at the very least, and disastrous or expensive in a worst-case situation. Bad tenants have left landlords with garbage to clean up after suddenly leaving a property, pet damage and repairs in suites clearly marked as not allowing pets, damage to property after massive parties, junk removal requirements after night-time move-outs, and everything in between.

Horror stories are everywhere, and news travels fast: selecting the right tenants is the most important step in the real estate rental business. Landlords who can master this skill will succeed in the business, while the opposite is also true, unfortunately. Bad tenants are the number one reason for landlords leaving the industry and selling their properties in search of greener pastures.

Landlording is a risky business. Selecting a disreputable tenant who causes major damage to a unit can leave a landlord with a significant bill for clean-up and repairs, scare off other regularly paying tenants, and even label the landlord as inattentive or with the classic slumlord designation.

Unfortunately, there is rarely any insurance that can protect landlords in this area, and a problematic tenancy resulting in a massive expense will almost never pass the strict criteria that an insurance policy will require prior to paying out on a repair claim.

Tenancy laws throughout Canada differ greatly, but they all set out specific protections for both landlords and tenants. Most landlords assert that the laws favour tenants in almost every situation. Certain provinces, such as Alberta, offer slightly more protection to landlords than other provinces, where landlords can be forced to endure a problematic tenancy for months, or even years.

How to screen your prospective tenant
The best and most sure-fire way for landlords to avoid having to deal with this problem starts at the very beginning of the landlord-tenant relationship. Landlords who screen their tenants properly will greatly reduce the risk of future loss, maintain their reputation in the greater community without blemish, and not be constantly stressed about their rental properties.

Here are three tried and true methods of selecting the best and most qualified tenants and learning ways to avoid costly disasters.

1.) Rental documents
As any real estate or courtroom lawyer will tell you, good documents are the starting point of any successful business relationship. Having a successful tenancy requires good, clear, concise definitions of everybody’s responsibilities and rights. Skipping this step means a tenancy relationship is beginning without a solid foundation, and during times of difficulty there may be nothing to refer to for clarification.

Rental application form

This document is probably the most important of any document in the entire rental process, which comes as a surprise to many new landlords.

A good rental application will require information on:
the applicant’s job
their supervisor
their income
current address
landlord reference, friends and referees
government identification
next of kin and extended family members
any additional details believed to be relevant to the approval process

This information will help landlords gain a better understanding of the tenant’s characteristics. More importantly, however, it gives the landlord some good contacts to track down the tenant if they should disappear. Visithttp://hopestreet.ca/rental_resources/ for a free download of a comprehensive Rental Application Form.

Move-in inspection report
This is the second-most important document in the landlord-tenant relationship. Unfortunately, it is often overlooked.

Most provinces require a landlord and tenant to complete a move-in report upon onset of a tenancy. This quantifies and documents the condition of a property so that, when the tenant leaves, any damage caused is clear. A thorough and concise move-in report card is a sure-fire way of avoiding significant disputes over tenant-related damage. Most provinces require a landlord to produce this report prior to deducting any funds from a tenant’s security deposit.

Residential tenancy agreement
As the name suggests, this document will establish the terms of the working relationship between the tenant and landlord. In general, the more detail it provides the better, and sourcing a free online residential tenancy document is not sufficient to cover a landlord’s interests.

Most local rental associations will sell well-written and well-researched versions of residential tenancy agreement documents with several carbon copies for each party. Landlords and tenants fill in various fields relating to names, address, and rental amounts.

Addendum to residential tenancy agreement
This can be a small side document that forms part of the agreement and sets out additional rules for items such as pets, smoking in the unit, or penalties for late rental payments. These documents are harder to enforce but establish good guidelines for the day-to-day operations of a rental property.

2.) What to look for when showing rental property
The first interaction with a tenant provides a great opportunity to gain an impression of them. During the initial showing, the tenant may be more concerned with looking around their new home than acting in a manner consistent with getting their application approved. Some careful observations by the landlord can be extremely useful when considering the tenant’s application.

Here are a few things to look for:

Did the tenants arrive on time?
Tenants who are respectful of their landlord’s time are good tenants to have. Common excuses for showing up late are that the tenant got lost, or was not able to round up family members or kids. Are these seemingly minor excuses reasonable? Probably not. Tenants who do not arrive on time for a showing are not likely to pay their rent on time either. Avoid these tenants at all costs.

Are the children well behaved?
Tenants who want something – in this case, to move into your rental property – are likely to be on their best behaviour. They will speak politely, act respectfully, and maintain a professional manner. Kids, on the other hand, can be cautioned numerous times to behave but have shorter attention spans. Are the kids bouncing around the property in a rambunctious manner? Be sure their behaviour will become much worse when the landlord leaves the premises. If the tenant’s kids are behaving poorly during the showing, expect the property to be returned to you with obvious damage from rambunctious kids.

Did tenant take off their shoes?
If a landlord has to ask the tenant to remove their shoes, this is a good indication that they are not in the habit of doing so. While this may be a personal choice, and can be a cultural issue, tenants who remove their shoes are likely to cause less stress on the flooring of a rental property. Avoid tenants who plan to wear shoes inside their rental property.

What does the back seat of the tenant’s car look like?
This is a tried and true technique for learning whether the prospective renter will keep the rental property clean, or let clutter, dirt and debris build up. Avoid tenants with garbage in their car, as this will mirror the cleanliness of their home.

3.) Verifying information in a rental application
The rental application contains the most comprehensive set of information about the prospective renters and should take the most time to review and confirm.

Renters are extremely unlikely to include information in their application that they know will hinder their chance of having it approved. In addition to thorough follow-up of the details in the application, follow the smell test for your rental tenants. If a landlord happens to smell a skunk hiding in the rental application, then the balance of probabilities suggests there is in fact a skunk hiding there. In practice this means that if a tenant’s information seems too good to be true, it usually is. Ask the following questions:

Does the tenant’s stated income seem unreasonably high?
Look for ways to confirm this income, such as a letter of employment from a reputable business. If the income is from self-employment, ask for a recent tax return to confirm it. Remember: the more intrusive the questioning, the less likelihood of a disaster or massive repair bill from a problematic tenancy.

Is the employer reputable?
A quick Google search to confirm the existence of the company or place of work provided by the tenant should be sufficient. If it does not exist or is extremely difficult to find online, then it is likely to have been made up. If the tenant claims to be self-employed, ask for a business card or marketing/promotional materials to prove the company’s existence. If it cannot be confirmed, decline the tenant’s application.

Are there gaps in the tenant’s rental history?
If a tenant’s application lacks previous landlord information for a period of time (typically six or 12 months), they may be trying to hide a less than positive past tenancy. If they refuse to provide comprehensive chronological information for the past two years, ask where they lived during the missing time. A backpacking trip overseas or living with parents are acceptable responses; disclosure of a problematic tenancy followed by court eviction is not an acceptable response.

Ask the current referees if they can provide names and contact information for other referees
Following these strategies will help you weed out undesirable applicants and greatly reduce, if not eliminate, the likelihood of a rental catastrophe.

Source: SHAMON KURESHI Special to The Globe and Mail Published Tuesday, Sep. 03, 2013 6:00AM EDT

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