Tag Archives: millennials

Canada’s Top 25 Best Places to Live in 2018

25. Whitby, Ont.

Rank in 2017: 103
Population: 136,657
Estimated Unemployment Rate: 5.7%
Median Household Income: $101,792
Average Household Net Worth: $817,453
Property Tax: 11.1%
Total Days Above 20°C: 100
Crime Rate Per 100,000:* 3,251
Family Doctors Per 100,000:* 81
See more stats about Whitby, Ont. here.


24. New Tecumseth, Ont.

Rank in 2017: 170
Population: 36,745
Estimated Unemployment Rate: 5.7%
Median Household Income: $96,041
Average Household Net Worth: $755,965
Property Tax: 20.5%
Total Days Above 20°C: 122
Crime Rate Per 100,000:* 2,906
Family Doctors Per 100,000:* 95
See more stats about New Tecumseth, Ont. here.


23. Newmarket, Ont.

Rank in 2017: 56
Population: 90,908
Estimated Unemployment Rate: 5.7%
Median Household Income: $95,636
Average Household Net Worth: $947,429
Property Tax: 16.1%
Total Days Above 20°C: 107
Crime Rate Per 100,000:* 2,749
Family Doctors Per 100,000:* 95
See more stats about Newmarket, Ont. here.


22. Bonnyville No. 87, Alta.

Rank in 2017: 228
Population: 14,658
Estimated Unemployment Rate: 3.9%
Median Household Income: $103,652
Average Household Net Worth: $789,157
Property Tax: 94.0%
Total Days Above 20°C: 86
Crime Rate Per 100,000:* 4,899
Family Doctors Per 100,000:* 93
See more stats about Bonnyville No. 87, Alta. here.


21. The Nation, Ont.

Rank in 2017: 123
Population: 13,275
Estimated Unemployment Rate: 5.1%
Median Household Income: $88,088
Average Household Net Worth: $478,620
Property Tax: 54.9%
Total Days Above 20°C: 113
Crime Rate Per 100,000:* 2,186
Family Doctors Per 100,000:* 142
See more stats about The Nation, Ont. here.


20. Whistler, B.C.

Rank in 2017: 84
Population: 13,193
Estimated Unemployment Rate: 4.3%
Median Household Income: $86,423
Average Household Net Worth: $1,460,422
Property Tax: 98.6%
Total Days Above 20°C: 83
Crime Rate Per 100,000:* 14,137
Family Doctors Per 100,000:* 159
See more stats about Whistler, B.C. here.


19. St. Albert, Alta.

Rank in 2017: 7
Population: 70,874
Estimated Unemployment Rate: 6.8%
Median Household Income: $123,948
Average Household Net Worth: $900,192
Property Tax: 66.3%
Total Days Above 20°C: 84
Crime Rate Per 100,000:* 5,313
Family Doctors Per 100,000:* 129
See more stats about St. Albert, Alta. here.


18. King, Ont.

Rank in 2017: 68
Population: 26,697
Estimated Unemployment Rate: 5.7%
Median Household Income: $110,816
Average Household Net Worth: $2,655,435
Property Tax: 18.1%
Total Days Above 20°C: 114
Crime Rate Per 100,000:* 2,749
Family Doctors Per 100,000:* 95
See more stats about King, Ont. here.


17. Lévis, Que.

Rank in 2017: 9
Population: 147,403
Estimated Unemployment Rate: 3.4%
Median Household Income: $79,323
Average Household Net Worth: $387,146
Property Tax: 65.1%
Total Days Above 20°C: 94
Crime Rate Per 100,000:* 2,784
Family Doctors Per 100,000:* 106
See more stats about Lévis, Que. here.


16. Toronto, Ont.

Rank in 2017: 129
Population: 2,933,262
Estimated Unemployment Rate: 5.7%
Median Household Income: $55,945
Average Household Net Worth: $906,663
Property Tax: 66.0%
Total Days Above 20°C: 117
Crime Rate Per 100,000:* 3,847
Family Doctors Per 100,000:* 75
See more stats about Toronto, Ont. here.


15. Fort St. John, B.C.

Rank in 2017: 160
Population: 21,251
Estimated Unemployment Rate: 5.7%
Median Household Income: $106,327
Average Household Net Worth: $440,481
Property Tax: 99.5%
Total Days Above 20°C: 64
Crime Rate Per 100,000:* 14,000
Family Doctors Per 100,000:* 104
See more stats about Fort St. John, B.C. here.


14. Saugeen Shores, Ont.

Rank in 2017: 17
Population: 14,109
Estimated Unemployment Rate: 4.9%
Median Household Income: $105,210
Average Household Net Worth: $777,845
Property Tax: 14.2%
Total Days Above 20°C: 110
Crime Rate Per 100,000:* 5,113
Family Doctors Per 100,000:* 107
See more stats about Saugeen Shores, Ont. here.


13. Mont-Royal, Que.

Rank in 2017: 8
Population: 21,172
Estimated Unemployment Rate: 6.3%
Median Household Income: $145,853
Average Household Net Worth: $2,392,238
Property Tax: 1.4%
Total Days Above 20°C: 117
Crime Rate Per 100,000:* 4,594
Family Doctors Per 100,000:* 124
See more stats about Mont-Royal, Que. here.


12. Red Deer, Alta.

Rank in 2017: 330
Population: 107,564
Estimated Unemployment Rate: 4.9%
Median Household Income: $90,844
Average Household Net Worth: $628,900
Property Tax: 86.7%
Total Days Above 20°C: 83
Crime Rate Per 100,000:* 19,460
Family Doctors Per 100,000:* 99
See more stats about Red Deer, Alta. here.


11. Camrose, Alta.

Rank in 2017: 216
Population: 19,488
Estimated Unemployment Rate: 3.9%
Median Household Income: $61,873
Average Household Net Worth: $519,846
Property Tax: 74.9%
Total Days Above 20°C: 83
Crime Rate Per 100,000:* 9,520
Family Doctors Per 100,000:* 99
See more stats about Camrose, Alta. here.


10. Halton Hills, Ont.

Rank in 2017: 24
Population: 65,782
Estimated Unemployment Rate: 5.7%
Median Household Income: $108,410
Average Household Net Worth: $1,190,923
Property Tax: 24.3%
Total Days Above 20°C: 120
Crime Rate Per 100,000:* 2,133
Family Doctors Per 100,000:* 91
See more stats about Halton Hills, Ont. here.


9. Saint-Lambert, Que.

Rank in 2017: 55
Population: 22,432
Estimated Unemployment Rate: 4.9%
Median Household Income: $83,626
Average Household Net Worth: $881,272
Property Tax: 12.5%
Total Days Above 20°C: 118
Crime Rate Per 100,000:* 3,724
Family Doctors Per 100,000:* 96
See more stats about Saint-Lambert, Que. here.


8. Westmount, Que.

Rank in 2017: 52
Population: 21,083
Estimated Unemployment Rate: 7.5%
Median Household Income: $117,755
Average Household Net Worth: $3,953,205
Property Tax: 8.9%
Total Days Above 20°C: 117
Crime Rate Per 100,000:* 4,594
Family Doctors Per 100,000:* 124
See more stats about Westmount, Que. here.


7. Canmore, Alta.

Rank in 2017: 29
Population: 14,930
Estimated Unemployment Rate: 5.1%
Median Household Income: $75,848
Average Household Net Worth: $1,478,315
Property Tax: 99.0%
Total Days Above 20°C: 64
Crime Rate Per 100,000:* 7,482
Family Doctors Per 100,000:* 138
See more stats about Canmore, Alta. here.


6. Milton, Ont.

Rank in 2017: 151
Population: 120,556
Estimated Unemployment Rate: 5.7%
Median Household Income: $111,875
Average Household Net Worth: $1,129,276
Property Tax: 67.7%
Total Days Above 20°C: 120
Crime Rate Per 100,000:* 2,133
Family Doctors Per 100,000:* 91
See more stats about Milton, Ont. here.


5. Lacombe, Alta.

Rank in 2017: 299
Population: 13,906
Estimated Unemployment Rate: 4.9%
Median Household Income: $97,800
Average Household Net Worth: $754,291
Property Tax: 76.6%
Total Days Above 20°C: 81
Crime Rate Per 100,000:* 7,932
Family Doctors Per 100,000:* 99
See more stats about Lacombe, Alta. here.


4. Saint-Bruno-de-Montarville, Que.

Rank in 2017: 6
Population: 27,171
Estimated Unemployment Rate: 4.9%
Median Household Income: $96,757
Average Household Net Worth: $864,221
Property Tax: 18.8%
Total Days Above 20°C: 118
Crime Rate Per 100,000:* 3,724
Family Doctors Per 100,000:* 96
See more stats about Saint-Bruno-de-Montarville, Que. here.


3. Russell Township, Ont.

Rank in 2017: 21
Population: 17,155
Estimated Unemployment Rate: 5.1%
Median Household Income: $112,644
Average Household Net Worth: $509,564
Property Tax: 50.1%
Total Days Above 20°C: 78
Crime Rate Per 100,000:* 2,540
Family Doctors Per 100,000:* 142
See more stats about Russell Township, Ont. here.


2. Ottawa, Ont.

Rank in 2017: 1
Population: 999,183
Estimated Unemployment Rate: 5.1%
Median Household Income: $93,975
Average Household Net Worth: $695,242
Property Tax: 39.3%
Total Days Above 20°C: 117
Crime Rate Per 100,000:* 3,782
Family Doctors Per 100,000:* 142
See more stats about Ottawa, Ont. here.


1. Oakville, Ont.

Rank in 2017: 15
Population: 209,039
Estimated Unemployment Rate: 5.7%
Median Household Income: $112,207
Average Household Net Worth: $1,742,036
Property Tax: 21.4%
Total Days Above 20°C: 107
Crime Rate Per 100,000:* 2,133
Family Doctors Per 100,000:* 91
See more stats about Oakville, Ont. here.

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Affordability: What first-time homeowners need to know

Affordability. It’s a word that gets tossed around a lot when people talk about homeownership, but what does it really mean? Affordability is a term that’s both quantifiable (lending institutions use a formula) and a little bit subjective (lifestyle considerations factor in, too). Here’s what you need to know about affordability, and what it means for you.

AFFORDABILITY, AS DETERMINED BY LENDERS

For lending institutions and mortgage insurers, affordability can be summed up by the debt service ratios, as indicated by your gross debt service ratio and total debt service ratio.

Gross debt service (GDS) ratio
  • Homeownership costs (mortgage payments, property taxes, heating and, if applicable, 50% of condo fees), relative to household income
Total debt service (TDS) ratio
  • Homeownership costs (as outlined above) plus debt payments (credit cards, lines of credit, student loans, car loans, etc.), relative to household income

To qualify for mortgage insurance (mandatory for any home purchase with a down payment of less than 20% of the cost of the home), the highest allowable GDS ratio is 39% and the highest allowable TDS ratio is 44%.

TIP: Get a quick snapshot of your current debt service ratios via Genworth Canada’s What Can I Afford? calculator.

AFFORDABILITY, AS DETERMINED BY LIFESTYLE

Although debt service ratios are an indicator of bottom-line affordability, other real-world factors should be considered up front by potential homeowners.

Expenses like groceries, child care, transportation, and mobile phone and Internet services, for instance, are not covered by TDS, but they’re more or less fixed costs for many households. While they don’t affect debt service ratios, they should be included in your own budget calculations, as they eat up a large chunk of income.

Discretionary expenses like clothing, entertainment, memberships and kids’ extracurricular activities should also be factored into affordability considerations. Are there any areas where you could cut back? Or will some expenses disappear, such as when a car is paid off or when a child leaves daycare for full-time school?

SET A BUDGET YOU CAN AFFORD

Between the numbers-driven debt service ratios used by banks, trust companies and mortgage insurers and the discretionary lifestyle expenses that also affect your bottom line, you will find what affordability means for you.

It’s never too early in your homeownership journey to speak with a mortgage professional or financial planner to determine how much mortgage you can comfortably carry. This will help you assess your financial fitness and also help you set realistic goals on an achievable timeline.

Source: Genworth.ca (Homeownership.ca) 

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Brand New Affordable Housing Development Coming to Mississauga

I

t’s no secret that housing has become increasingly more expensive in Toronto and the GTA, with detached houses typically costing buyers in Mississauga and surrounding cities between $800,000 and $1 million (often more) and condos—even modestly-sized two-bedroom units—running buyers over $500,000.

With wages failing to keep up with soaring real estate values (and with renting becoming increasingly more costly as homes become more valuable), a lot of lower and middle-income earners have been locked out of the real estate market entirely. Those who have managed to rent or purchase homes in the city are often paying well over 30 per cent of their household income on shelter costs.

For that reason, residents might be pleased to hear that a brand new affordable housing development recently broke ground in the Malton area of Mississauga.

Late last month, Habitat for Humanity Halton—Mississauga, City of Mississauga and Region of Peel staff and officials hosted a groundbreaking ceremony to celebrate the launch of the Bristow-Law Build Project.

The property, located at 3073 Merritt Ave., was purchased for a toonie. Once home to a fire station, the land has since undergone a rigorous clean-up process and will soon to be transformed into four new homes for local families in need of an affordable place to live.

“The process from paying the city a toonie to now took about three years,” says John Gerrard, CEO of Habitat for Humanity Halton—Mississauga.

“[Councillor Carolyn Parrish] came to us and said ‘I think I can get you some land. There are some issues, you’ve gotta work through those issues,’ and we did.”

Gerrard says the main issue was the environment.

“With a fire station on site, there’s bound to be some form of environmental element that needs to be cleaned, so we did the first round and cleaned 97 per cent of it and had to go back and do one more round just to be sure. That takes almost 16 months, but now we’re here. We’ve submitted all our paperwork, it’s in the city planning department. We hope to start in September.”

Groundbreaking ceremony

Gerrard says the project, which he expects will take about 12 months to complete, will boast four two-storey units with basement suites that can be used for other family members.

“These are big homes, they’re four and five bedroom units, which are very rare. We’re very excited we can do that here in Malton, there are lots of large families here and lots of new Canadians and they tend to have larger families.”

Gerrard says the building, once complete, will house up to 20 individuals.

While the project won’t result in a massive affordable housing structure, it’s one of several projects geared towards providing more housing for the city’s lower and middle-class residents. Earlier this year, a new Daniels development with affordable units broke ground at 360 City Centre Drive.

The city has been working to increase affordable housing stock with its Making Room for the Middle strategy, a plan that involves petitioning senior levels of government for taxation policies and credits that incent affordable housing; piloting tools such as pre-zoning and a Development Permit System to develop affordable housing in appropriate locations (close to transit systems, for example); encouraging the Region of Peel to develop an inclusionary zoning incentive program for private and nonprofit developers; encouraging the region to investigate the cost of deferring development charges on the portion of affordable units provided in newly constructed multiple dwellings and more.

“Affordable housing is at the heart of our plans to build complete city,” says Mayor Bonnie Crombie.

“A Mississauga where people have access to modern public transit, and can find good paying jobs, earn an education and enjoy an unrivalled quality of life. The City of Mississauga was pleased to sell this land, a former city fire station, for a toonie. Now that’s a deal.”

As for how the Habitat project will work, Gerrard says the initiative is unique in the sense that it will allow families to become homeowners.

“This project is very unique. What happens is the family are given the home on title. They’re sold the house at fair market value, which, in this case, could be $700,000. However, they only pay 30 per cent maximum of their net home income. So if only two family members are working, they only pay 30 per cent of what they can.”

Gerrard says the residents can spend 70 per cent on all the other things they need, such as education, food, clothing and other necessities.

“That’s why our food bank use is so high, because when you have to choose between shelter and food, you sometimes choose shelter and don’t eat.”

Families who wish to move on can sell the unit back to Habitat—and take some equity with them.

“The next best thing is that they will be able to sell it back to us and we’ll keep it affordable, but give the family every penny back plus the equity, so they don’t have to go through a long process, they can give it back and we give them the value back,” says Gerrard.

“We retain the unit for another family in perpetuity. It will always be affordable housing and we’ll manage it with the family. It’s an extension of giving a hand up, and it gives a further hand up because they can buy a new home with their deposit. They take equity with them as well. It’s a homeownership program, but they’re guaranteed to get out what they put in, so if the market drops, they’re protected.”

As for who will get to move into the project once it’s complete, Gerrard says the families have not yet been chosen.

“Traditionally the building process is a long process, it can take from one to three years, we used to pick our families early on and they would have to wait and it would be frustrating, especially in some cases where people are desperate for housing,” he says.

“We work with our families and select them 120 days before the project is completed. That way, they see the reality, they see its coming and they can plan appropriately. We want them to come and learn all the extra things, like financial management, how to take care of a home, etc.”

As for the project taking shape in Malton, Councillor Parrish says it’s an ideal neighbourhood for the development.

“It’s particularly nice to welcome Habitat for Humanity to the Malton community. Malton has for some years lived down a reputation as a rough town, it’s not,” says Parrish. They are the sweetest, kindest, nicest people, and you’ll see that as you’re building here. They’ll bring you coffee and tea and they’ll be coming with their hammers and saying ‘what can I do?'” It’s a wonderful village.”

Parrish said Habitat and the city faced some challenges in terms of moving the development forward.

“It’s wonderful to have you here. Habitat is probably the most innovative group I’ve ever met, you’re always one step ahead of where the government is and you do a great job. We had a lot of problems with resistance from the airport. Thanks to the mayor and council, we’ve actually negotiated with the GTAA to change the rules around here. This is a great location, we hope to get more semis and more housing out here. The Region has been incredible.”

In terms of who will eventually live in the structure, Gerrard says Habitat works with a number of organizations to decide which families are ideal candidates.

“They could be on the Peel housing list or referred to us. We work with community groups, women’s shelters, any organization with families. We try to help anyone in need.”

And while this project is more modest in scope, Gerrard sees more substantial developments in Habitat for Humanity’s (and Mississauga’s) future.

“We’ve been working on some big projects for a couple years now. We’re hoping our next development will be somewhere in the neighbourhood of 120 units, so we’re in discussion with some developers in the community on some land, and ultimately our objective would be to work within the City of Mississauga’s new affordable housing strategy,” he says.

“We’d like to have a mixed environment that gives young people the opportunity to buy a home, at the same time being able to retain inventory to help the next family and the next family and the next family.”

The development should be complete by the fall.

 

Source: insauga.com – by Ashley Newport on July 8, 2018

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Crucial inspections coverage

“Whether you’re thinking of buying or selling, a home transaction can be an extremely stressful process,” said Jackie Chetcuti, head of Home Protection Solutions at FCT. “Buyers often fear that they may have to incur significant expenses soon after acquiring a home, and sellers may be hesitant to get an inspection at the risk of significant repair costs prior to listing their property.

“These products seek to reduce this anxiety by assessing over 400 features around the house through an

independent home inspection, and provide warranty coverage on a property’s larger, stress-inducing blind spots that are often expensive to fix.”

FCT is offering one product for buyers and another for sellers that offer comprehensive third-party home inspections with warranties that are transferable, and that cover up to $20,000.

Home purchases are usually characterized as the most expensive purchases of people’s lives, and with good reason. However, that could become compounded by something a home inspector might miss.

 

“When you go in as a buyer, you get a home inspector, but there’s not such a paradigm shift with a product like that because people are doing home inspections on the buy side,” said Chetcuti. “You get a full home inspection with over 400 points of data on the home, and that comes with a 21-month warranty.”

Real estate sales representatives, in particular, can save themselves headaches will unhappy clients by informing them about their different options, particularly if they’re millennials, she added.

“For a real estate agent, it’s important that people let their clients know that this is an option available in the market. It also provides more transparency around what people are buying,” said Chetcuti. “There’s a demand for information with millennials. A lot of the time, for a realtor with millennial clients, they’ll show up already knowing more about the house before you even take them through it. It puts the information out there before someone gets attached to a home and then finds something out about it.”

Source: Canadian Real Estate Wealth – by Neil Sharma 04 Jul 2018

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Late payments set to rise on Canadians’ $599-billion of credit card, non-mortgage debt, Equifax predicts

‘We will start to see delinquency rates inching up a little bit, and debt probably slowing down,’ as Bank of Canada starts raising interest rates, credit agency says

Canadian delinquency rates, which have been declining since the last recession, will probably reverse and begin to climb by the end of 2018 as the central bank presses ahead with interest rate increases, according to the country’s largest credit reporting firm.

Regina Malina, senior director of analytics at Equifax Canada, predicts late payments on the country’s $599 billion (US$455 billion) of credit card, auto and other non-mortgage consumer debt will begin to move “modestly higher” by the end of this year.

“Our prediction is that we will start to see delinquency rates inching up a little bit, and debt probably slowing down,” Malina said last week in an interview.

The delinquency rate — which measures the number of payments on non-mortgage debt that were more than 90 days past due — was 1.08 per cent in the first quarter, up slightly from the fourth quarter but still close to the lowest level since the 2008-09 recession.

The Toronto-based analyst declined to estimate how high delinquencies will climb, saying it depends on the pace of interest rate increases and what happens in the trade battle between the U.S. and Canada. She cited the experience in Alberta, where delinquency rates rose in some instances 20 per cent or 30 per cent on a year-over-year basis after the oil-price collapse. Such an extreme case, however, isn’t what Equifax is predicting. “It will only happen if we start seeing deterioration in employment numbers,” she said, adding delinquencies should remain “still very low,” and “they’re just going to start inching up a little bit, probably not double digits.”

CHANGE COMING?

Household credit has ballooned to unprecedented levels in Canada, as in many other developed countries, amid historically low interest rates. That hasn’t posed too many difficulties so far, because the economy and the labour market have generated solid growth, allowing people to handle servicing costs. But with the Bank of Canada intent on raising rates and the U.S. and Canada engaged in a tit-for-tat tariff fight, that could change.

A red flag in the Equifax data was a decline in the share of people who completely pay off their credit cards each month. The 56 per cent who did so in the first quarter matched the fourth-quarter number and was down from as high as 59 per cent last year. It’s a small but important detail, according to Malina.

“The changes aren’t big, but when they’re consistent and we see it for two or three quarters, we start to believe it,” she said. “Given that less people are making their credit card payments in full, and those people are usually people with lower delinquency rates, we might be seeing overall delinquency rates deteriorating.”

A red flag in the Equifax data was a decline in the share of people who completely pay off their credit cards each month. Elise Amendola/AP Photo file

Consumer debt including mortgages was $1.83 trillion in the first quarter, up 0.4 per cent from the end of 2017 and 5.7 per cent from the same quarter a year earlier, Equifax said.

Excluding mortgages, Canadians carry an average of $22,800 each in debt. Some other highlights from the report include (all figures exclude mortgage debt):

Those between the ages of 46 and 55 have the highest average debt loads, at $34,100.

That age group is also seeing the largest increase in debt, year-over-year, at 4 per cent.

Of nine cities listed, Fort McMurray, Alberta, had the highest average debt levels, at $37,800, as well as the highest delinquency rate, at 1.72 per cent.

Vancouver and Toronto saw the highest rate of debt accumulation in the first quarter, with 5.2 per cent and 5 per cent growth from a year earlier Montreal is the least indebted city, with average debt loads at $17,300 Ontario and British Columbia have the lowest delinquency rates, at 0.95 per cent and 0.84 per cent. Nova Scotia, at 1.74 per cent, had the highest.

Source: Bloomberg News Chris Fournier

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Mortgage 101: 10 Mortgage terms every first-time homebuyer should know

Getting started on your homeownership journey? Familiarize yourself with the “local language,” a.k.a. mortgage speak. This introduction to 10 key mortgage terms and phrases will boost your homebuying IQ and have you ready to meet with a mortgage broker to talk about your options.

Amortization period

The amortization period refers to the number of years it will take to pay off your mortgage through regular payments. Most mortgages, including Genworth Canada-insured mortgages, are amortized over 25 years.

DID YOU KNOW? You can pay off your mortgage sooner (saving interest in the long run) by:

  • Making payments biweekly instead of monthly;
  • Making an extra principal or lump sum payment on the anniversary date of your mortgage;
  • Boosting your payment by 10-20% on the anniversary date;
  • Making the same payments each month (or better yet: biweekly), even as your principal borrowed amount gets lower.

Fixed rate mortgage

With a fixed rate mortgage, the interest rate on your home loan is set for the term of the mortgage. Fixed rate mortgages offer the peace of mind of consistency: you’ll know exactly how much you’ll owe at the end of each mortgage term.

See also: Variable rate mortgage

Gross debt service (GDS) ratio

GDS refers to the percentage of your household’s gross monthly income that goes toward your housing payments – mortgage (principal + interest), property taxes, heating and, if applicable, 50% of condo fees. Lenders use your GDS and TDS (total debt service) ratios to assess your mortgage application and to determine how much to loan you and what interest rate to apply. Genworth Canada programs require a GDS ratio of no greater than 39%.

See also: Total debt service (TDS) ratio

High-ratio mortgage

A high-ratio mortgage is one for which the homebuyer makes a down payment of less than 20% of the cost of the home. All high-ratio mortgages must be covered by mortgage loan insurance (also known as “mortgage insurance”).

See also: Low-ratio mortgage

Low-ratio mortgage

Also known as a conventional mortgage, a low-ratio mortgage is one where the homebuyer has made a down payment of 20% or more of the home’s purchase price. No mortgage insurance is required for this type of mortgage.

DID YOU KNOW? You can use your retirement savings to help buy your nest egg. The federal government’s Home Buyers’ Plan lets you borrow money from your RRSP to put toward the down payment for your first home.

See also: High-ratio mortgage

Mortgage loan insurance

Also known as “mortgage default insurance” or just “mortgage insurance,” this financial product is mandatory on all high-ratio mortgages. Your mortgage lender pays the insurance premium and then passes the cost on to you; you can pay it in one lump sum or carry it on your mortgage for monthly payments.

Mortgage term

Not to be confused with amortization, mortgage term refers to the time period covered by your mortgage agreement. It can range from one to five years or more. After each term expires, the balance of the mortgage principal (the remaining loan amount) can be repaid in full, or a new mortgage can be renegotiated at current interest rates.

Principal

The amount initially borrowed for your home purchase. The balance of this amount will go down as you make regular mortgage payments. (Your mortgage payments go toward a portion of the principal, as well as the loan interest and, for those with high-ratio mortgages, mortgage insurance.)

Total debt service (TDS) ratio

TDS refers to the percentage of your household’s gross monthly income that goes toward housing costs (i.e., mortgage, property taxes, heating, etc.) plus your other debts and financing (i.e., car loans, credit cards, etc.). Banks use this calculation, along with your gross debt service ratio, when assessing your mortgage application. Genworth Canada programs require a TDS of no greater than 44%.

See also: Gross debt service (GDS) ratio

Variable rate mortgage

Also known as a floating rate mortgage or adjustable rate mortgage, this type of mortgage has an interest rate that fluctuates with the prime lending rate. The main benefit of variable rate mortgages is lower interest rates, but in return, mortgagors (homeowners) take on risk: if the prime rate goes up, a larger chunk of your mortgage payment will go toward the interest, not paying down your principal. The result: your mortgage could take longer to pay off and cost you more in interest.

See also: Fixed rate mortgage

Read on! You can enhance your Mortgage 101 education with these Homeownership.ca feature stories:

Source: HomeOwnership.ca

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For most, a mortgage is painful. For the wealthy, it’s a money-making tool

Canadians typically consider mortgages as a burden, to be paid down as quickly as possible, or at least before retirement.

It may seem counter-intuitive, but for the wealthy, mortgages are a tool to make more money.

Carrying a mortgage when you don’t need one might seem like a head-scratcher. Why borrow when you’ve already got plenty of funds at hand?

But as F. Scott Fitzgerald purportedly once said, “The rich are different from you and me.”

Wealthy people take out mortgages against their real estate holdings and use the money to invest.

It sometimes makes sense for high-net-worth people to take on new debt, says James Robinson, mortgage agent at Dominion Lending Centres in Toronto.

“Using your real estate holdings to borrow money for investment purposes – either your principal residence or any other investment or personal-use property – falls under the ‘wealthy people become wealthy by using other people’s money’ category,’” Mr. Robinson says.

“If you can invest at a higher rate of return than you can borrow, you will increase your wealth and, therefore, your net worth.”

There are also tax advantages, though Mr. Robinson advises investors to seek professional advice about tax implications. In Canada, mortgage interest is not tax deductible; however, the interest paid on funds borrowed for investment is, so borrowing has to be structured carefully to avoid running afoul of the Canada Revenue Agency.

Remortgaging or taking a line of credit secured against property can also be advantageous for investors who are affluent but don’t quite reach the high-net-worth (HNW) category.

Financial institutions generally consider HNWs to be people with $1-million in liquid assets, while those with $100,000 to $1-million are considered “affluent” or “sub-HNW.”

One reason that HNW clients can consider taking on a mortgage is that “normally, they’re the ones who have access to assets for security [their houses and other properties] as well as the income required to service the debt,” says Paul Shelestowsky, senior wealth advisor at Meridian Credit Union in Niagara-on-the-Lake, Ont.

For those who are barely at the HNW threshold but want to boost their investable assets, “unless you can obtain a preferred rate from your lender, using secured debt is the only advisable way to borrow to invest,” Mr. Shelestowsky says.

Mr. Robinson cites several good ways to borrow to invest.

“The most common strategy used is to simply refinance your principal residence to access some of the equity you have built up over the years, and use the additional funds to purchase an investment property,” he says.

Wealthy borrowers who refinance in this way increase their asset base through leveraging, but this also is contingent on the value of real estate going up, Mr. Robinson adds.

“If you own $600,000 worth of real estate and prices rise by 5 per cent, you have increased your worth by $30,000. If you leverage and now own $1.2 million worth of real estate and prices rise by 5 per cent, you have increased your worth by $60,000.”

What could possibly go wrong? A few big things, the experts say.

For one, it’s never certain that the value of real estate will rise. There’s always the risk that you will be paying off a mortgage on a property whose value is drifting sideways, or even dropping. This could be happening, too, as your market investments are nosediving.

“Remember that when you leverage and asset values fall, the same multiplying effect occurs in the opposite direction. Don’t get caught in a get-poor-quick scheme,” Mr. Robinson says.

Real estate values do tend to go up over time, but it is not a straight line, he adds. In Ontario and other parts of Canada, the years from 1989 to 1996 were brutal for real estate values.

Debt-holders must be patient, says Andrea Thompson, senior financial planner with Coleman Wealth, part of Raymond James Ltd. in Toronto. “Investors must be able and willing to sit with a paper loss and continue to collect the monthly income, rather than panic and sell at a loss.”

Investors considering taking a mortgage should also be mindful of rising interest rates. The Bank of Canada is holding the line on rates for now, but it has hiked its key lending rate three times since last July, Ms. Thompson says.

High-net-worth borrowers also should consider the type of mortgage. “Looking at a variable rate or open mortgage might be preferable to some who want more flexibility, if they want to collapse or modify their strategy if and when interest rates rise,” Ms. Thompson says.

A different way to go, Mr. Robinson says, is to take what some lenders now offer as an “all in one” borrowing product, secured by real estate.

“This combines a mortgage with a home equity line of credit to allow you excellent flexibility in your borrowing as well as the ability to keep your borrowing segmented for interest calculation and tax deductability,” he explains.

Even the wealthy should be cautious in this volatile investment climate, Mr. Shelestowsky says.

“An overarching theme from the investment world is ‘lowered return expectations’ going forward,” he says. “Target expectations have been drastically reduced across all investor profiles.”

 

Source; SPECIAL TO THE GLOBE AND MAIL 

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