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What is a second mortgage? 5 tips you need to know

In certain circumstances, you may even have to think about getting a second mortgage. This is a mortgage typically taken out by homeowners who need cash for emergency repairs, working capital for business or investments, renovations, funding education, paying for a wedding, or even to consolidate other debts and lines of credit.

Let’s take a closer look at exactly what is a second mortgage, and what it means to you.

An overview of second mortgages

A second mortgage can mean two things: a mortgage you take out on a second home, some refer to literally as a second mortgage, and a mortgage which sits on top of a primary mortgage. The latter is the most accurate use of the term second mortgage, and is what we will be discussing today.

In this sense, a second mortgage is not a mortgage you get on a new home — it’s actually a secondary mortgage that you can take out on your existing property.

Second mortgages extract equity from a home, which allows homeowners to access capital when they need it. The basic form of second mortgage comes in the form of an lump sum loan.

With a standard equity loan, you can borrow up to 85 percent of the value of your home in major cities in B.C., Alberta, and Ontario. For most other cities in Canada, the maximum is typically 80 percent.

Over time, you will pay off the entirety of the loan and the interest, much like you would with a car loan. Regardless of the loan option you pursue, you should make sure you understand all the intricacies of second mortgages before getting started.

How a second mortgage works

What is a second mortgage and how does it work? As we mentioned above, a second mortgage is a secondary loan you can take out on top of your current home mortgage. They are typically held by a different mortgage lender than the one who lent you your primary mortgage. Getting a second mortgage enables you to access equity from your home without making any changes to your primary mortgage.

The distinction between primary and secondary mortgages is an important factor to keep in mind. Rather than simply increasing the principal of your initial mortgage loan, second mortgages have their own terms, rates and rules, which means you pay it off independently of your primary mortgage. When you get a second mortgage, you will continue to pay your primary mortgage, along with additional mortgage payments for your new loan.

Before you can apply for a second mortgage, you will need to find out how much equity you have in your home, your home’s value, and your credit score. All of these details will affect your ability to secure a second mortgage, and they also influence second mortgage rates and terms.

Next, you will need to shop around for the best rates from various banks and lenders. As always, it’s best to partner with a knowledgeable mortgage professional who tailor a loan product to your specific needs.

TALK WITH AN EXPERT 866-243-2207

After choosing a lender, you will fill out an application for a second mortgage. If you are approved, you can review the terms of your loan before signing an agreement.

In many ways, applying for a second mortgage is similar to applying for a primary mortgage. A major difference, however, is that second mortgage rates are typically higher than those associated with primary mortgages. This is because lenders that offer second mortgages typically have to assume more risk of delinquent payments or loan defaults.

The higher interest rate is also a result of the primary loan taking precedence over the secondary one. For example, should there be a forfeiture, the secondary lender will only get money after the primary one is paid in full. This makes secondary lending riskier.

Second mortgages can range greatly, but a borrower with good equity and credit history could get a 6.99% or 7.99% rate. While this may seem high, it’s low compared to most unsecured credit lines and credit cards

Below you will find some tips when it comes to second mortgages:

Tip #1 – Second mortgages are commonly used for…

Individuals and families may face a variety of circumstances that might lead them to consider a second mortgage loan. Generally, those who apply for a second mortgage do so out of necessity because they need capital quickly. In the interest of freeing up financial resources from home equity, they will assume the higher rates that come along with a second mortgage.

The following are some of the most common reasons people apply for second mortgages in Canada:

  • Working Capital: Getting access to your home equity is a primary funding method for those looking for working capital. This can include opening a new business or funding a current one, investing in businesses, retirement, or real estate, and any other forms of investing that requires a lump sum of capital.
  • Debt consolidation: If you have several loans and lines of credit from various lenders, banks or agencies, the payments, loan terms and interest rates may overwhelm you. When you have to concern yourself with numerous loans, you may be more likely to miss payments or pay excessive amounts of interest. A second mortgage loan allows you to pay off debts and consolidate loansinto one manageable mortgage agreement.
  • Renovations and repairs: It is common for home appliances and roofs to fail unexpectedly and necessitate emergency repairs. This kind of work on your home can be costly, and you might not have much time to save money for the repair. In other situations, you may simply want to make an improvement to the appearance or function of your home. Whatever the reasons, a second mortgage could allow you to finance these improvements.
  • Avoiding high penalties: Finally, a common use for a second mortgage is people who may have a first mortgage with a low rate locked in, and their penalty is high to break in order to access funds. It is far cheaper to get a 1-2 year second mortgage than pay a high breakage fee. This can provide access to funds for debt relief or investment capital. When the first mortgage matures, the two loans can then be blended into one.

Tip #2 – Helps those with bad credit

One of the top benefits of second mortgages is that it is possible to get one even if your credit history is mediocre or poor.

If you have paid off a significant amount of your primary mortgage loan, you have a record of making consistent and on-time payments and you have a lot of equity in your home, a lender may overlook your credit score (within reason) and approve you for a second mortgage.

Because a lender evaluates your suitability for a loan based on your equity and track record with your primary mortgage, you may even have an easier time getting a second mortgage than you would a standard loan—assuming you have been making your payments on time and you have plenty of equity.

Second mortgages are also a great way to clean up bad debt, such as high interest consumer debt, debt that is in collections, or even tax arrears.

Tip #3 – Private lenders are often more flexible

All federally regulated banks must operate within certain laws and guidelines. These rules reduce risk for the lender, but they often cause them to overlook reliable borrowers simply due to minor disqualifications.

Because every person is different, it’s important to ensure that your case is examined individually so that you have the best chance of getting the loan you need at a fair rate. To accomplish this, your best course of action can be to work with a private lender.

A private lender is a business—rather than a traditional bank or financial institution—who agrees to finance your loan. In the past, private lending was equated with individuals loaning out money at high interest rates. Although some still do this, private lenders include professional organizations, like CMI, who can offer a variety of loan products at competitive rates.

Tip #4 – Common costs associated

As with any loan, you may be subject to additional fees, including closing, legal, and appraisal fees.

When it’s all said and done, you may be on the hook for several thousands of dollars worth of fees, so make sure you know what to expect from your lender before you sign anything. This is why it’s important to work with an experienced broker who can guide you in the right direction.

TALK WITH AN EXPERT 866-243-2207

Tip #5 – Know how to find a second mortgage (talk to a professional)

Financial choices are not always totally clear, and it’s important that you examine all the options available to you to determine which decision is best for you and your family.

As a general rule, you should not make a big decision about your finances if you feel pressured or rushed. That said, you are considering a second mortgage because you are in a tough financial spot, and likely need some quick cash. This why it’s so important your partner with a knowledgeable and reputable broker to help guide you through the process in a timely manner.

Considering that there are so many different factors at play when it comes to second mortgages, you also shouldn’t attempt this process on your own. Look for guidance from a mortgage professional who you trust and who is looking out for your best interests.

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Even New Yorkers Can’t Afford a Home in Toronto

 

There’s only a handful of cities in the world that make living in New York seem cheap for middle-income people, places like London, Sydney and Hong Kong. And then there’s Toronto, as 26-year-old JunJun Wu will tell you with a sigh.

After almost three years in New York she opted to move to Toronto for what she figured would be less-expensive housing.

“The apartments that I saw were so tiny, which was shocking,” she said. “Compared to my studio in New York, these were half the size.”

Prices have soared almost 60 percent in the last five years in Canada’s biggest city, and are up another 3 percent already this year. They’re not as high as Vancouver — one of the hottest real-estate markets anywhere — but among the world’s major cities, Toronto housing ranks as the fifth most unaffordable relative to income, according to consultant Demographia.

Severely Unaffordable

The world’s seven priciest housing markets relative to salary

Source: Demographia

Rankings are only for major markets with over 5 million residents. Price and pre-tax income are medians.

All that means is that a Canadian millennial, aged 25 to 31 with a median income of C$38,148 ($29,360), can’t buy very much housing in Toronto. Her maximum budget at that salary would be about C$193,661, according to Royal LePage. That calculation includes tougher lending rules, institutedthis year, that has reduced buyers’ purchasing power by almost 20 percent and cooled the market.

That’s probably not even enough money to purchase the garage of a detached home in the Toronto region, where the average price was C$1.05 million in May, according to the Toronto Real Estate Board.

Rents are no better, having soared about 11 percent to an average monthly C$2,206 ($1,697) in the first quarter from a year earlier, according to researcher Urbanation. That’s if you can find a unit: the number of newly completed condos available dropped to 1,945 over that time frame, the lowest in more than eight years.

Angie Mosquera, a 23-year-old software developer, saw up to 30 different units in recent months but kept getting outbid.

“I was so frustrated by the whole process,” Mosquera said. “I was like screw this, I’m going to be 40 and living at home, and I don’t even want to live in Toronto anymore.”

She eventually found a tiny studio downtown for about C$1,620 per month, meeting her budget. Still, the rent eats up a huge chunk of her salary, which is especially frustrating because she moved to Toronto from Montreal for a 40 percent bump up in pay.

Penthouse Condo

Stephanie and Justin Wood

Source: Justin Wood

Even those with more resources find it tough. Three years ago, Justin Wood and his wife Stephanie bought a three-bedroom penthouse condo for about C$430,000. Its price surged by about C$181,000 and this year they decided to upgrade to a house, with a toddler in tow.

“We thought we were going to be rich and it was going to be amazing,” said Wood, 33, who is now chief executive officer of his own Toronto-based tech startup. “But then we were like ‘Oh wait, we have to buy something.’”

As living in Toronto proved to be too expensive, the Woods headed for the suburbs and ended up purchasing a three-bedroom detached house in neighboring Oakville with a pool for about C$800,000. Monthly mortgage payments are about C$3,400. The commute is around two hours.

After spending almost a month in Toronto looking at about 40 listings, JunJun Wu, a college-prep counselor originally from Montreal, finally found a studio to rent in downtown Toronto through an online listing. She’s relieved that she secured a lease but the experience has left her unnerved.

“Maybe I should’ve gone back to Montreal instead,” she said. “I’m thinking I’ll give myself maybe one or two years in this city to see.”

Source: 

 

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Is co-ownership a good idea?

As co-ownership becomes a popular antidote to unaffordability, expect to hear about ensuing acrimony.

“On paper, it seems like a great idea, but in reality…”

Steve Arruda, a Century 21 Regal Realty sales rep, agrees that unaffordability in cities like Toronto and Vancouver is catalyzing creating living arrangements, but he can see myriad problems arising from ones like co-ownership.

“Everybody has the best of plans, and on paper it looks perfect, but when they move in with each other, who’s responsible for what? What if one person wants to sell early because they got a job on the other side of the country or far outside of the city?”

While co-ownership between friends can be tricky, it becomes amplified when more than one family owns and shares a home.

“I’ve had ones where two friends bought a place together and thought it’d be a great idea and good for their families, but they didn’t buy a mansion,” said Arruda. “It was a crammed space for two families and four children. With the respective families or events they host, there will be issues that way. They have the best intentions, but when you’re living in a crammed space, function becomes a different story.

“It could be happy when two friends share but when you start bringing in partners—more personalities under one roof could cause a problem.”

Arruda concedes, however, that the arrangement has better likelihood of succeeding if a duplex is the shared abode. Not to say it won’t have its share of problems.

“I find the best option for that is if the home is divided equally into a duplex, each with its own kitchen and bathroom, and maybe they have a shared living space,” he said. “But if one person wants to sell, the other has to sell or buy that person out.”

Manu Singh, a broker with Right At Home Realty, doesn’t recommend co-ownership but nevertheless suggests both parties draw up an exit strategy.

“They should have an agreement in place, an exit strategy,” he said. “Just a simple contract, not a complicated one, that lays out what the exit strategy is should one party decide to move on. If it’s for investment purposes, maybe the appreciation rate reaches such and such level and only then can the partner decide to sell.”

Singh also recommends a minimum hold period of five years “to recoup a lot of costs of the transaction, like the Land Transfer Tax.”

Source: Canadian Real Estate Wealth – Neil Sharma 25 May 2018

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Your Spring Home Maintenance Checklist

When winter departs, it’s time to check for damage and prepare for hot weather ahead

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With the days lengthening and weather warming, spring is a good time to get outdoors and tackle some larger home projects. With the threat of winter storms past, you can look for damage and make any needed repairs, as well as prep your home and garden for summer. We spoke with an expert to get some tips on what to watch for this season, from proper irrigation to mosquitoes and termites (oh my!).
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BALTIMORE MAY SELL HOMES FOR $1 TO REVIVE NEGLECTED NEIGHBORHOODS

In order to revitalize distressed neighborhoods in Maryland, councilmembers and local community advocates are pushing for a government program that would sell thousands of vacant buildings in Baltimore for $1 each. In turn, buyers would have to promise to refurbish and live in the properties for a certain period of time.

 

Baltimore

 

According to a bill adopted by the Baltimore City Council last month, the program would revitalize “marginal neighborhoods by matching construction ability at the grass roots of Baltimore to production of affordable housing for workers’ families and neighbors.” The idea is modeled after the 1973 “Dollar House” program, which sold rundown, city-owned houses for $1 and helped rebuild ravaged neighborhoods in the city throughout the 1980s. The original program also granted buyers low-interest loans to rehabilitate the properties as long as they lived in the homes for a certain amount of time.

Now, advocates want to restore the program to curb the city’s blight epidemic and prevent more homes from becoming vacant. The program would also create construction jobs, say advocates.

On the other hand, the housing commissioner argues that the program is outdated and that there is not enough government funding to address the estimated 16,000 to 46,000 vacant homes in Baltimore, reports The Baltimore Sun. That’s triple the amount in the ’80s. Plus, about 250,000 fewer people live in the city compared to when the program first started.

Nonetheless, real estate agent and affordable housing specialist Mable Ivory applauded the idea, arguing that city governments have implemented similar programs to revitalize distressed areas in Detroit and Harlem. “It has been proven that when home ownership increased among residents in neighborhoods like Harlem and Detroit, which were once plagued by urban blight and flight, crime declined and the communities became more beautiful as owners took pride in their neighborhoods and took better care of them,” she said in an email. “Baltimore seeks to mirror the success that has been experienced in Harlem and Detroit by creating a similar, discount homeownership program.”

Whether interested in buying a vacant property in Baltimore or purchasing an affordable home elsewhere, Ivory advises potential purchasers to “do their due diligence and research” before taking on the cost of homeownership. “If possible, before bidding on the properties, homeowners should do a property inspection with licensed professionals, such as contractors, architects, and engineers, to have a clear and full understanding of all the repairs needed to make the home inhabitable; the cost of the repairs; as well as the time it will take to complete the entire renovation. The good news is that there are mortgage loan programs available like the FHA 203(k) mortgage loan program, which provide financing for the total renovation of a home.”

Selena Hill   

by April 13, 2018 Editor’s Note: This post originally published on December 27, 2017

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Closing defaults hit Toronto sellers hard in housing plunge: report

Hundreds of homeowners whose real estate transactions collapsed in the aftermath of Toronto’s market plunge last spring lost an average of $140,000 in property value when they eventually managed to sell their houses, according to a new report.

The study is the first to measure the loss of market value associated with so-called closing defaults, an unwelcome reality of real estate that lawyers say surged in the last half of 2017.

The report also identifies high demand from real estate investors as a key factor that fuelled the region’s white-hot market in early 2017. Investors bought 16.5 per cent of all low-rise houses in the Greater Toronto Area in the first quarter last year, a 65-per-cent increase compared to 12 months earlier.

At least 866 sales deals for low-rise houses failed to close in the GTA last year, according to the study released on Thursday by John Pasalis, a Toronto broker who analyzes industry statistics. The actual number of closing defaults is likely much higher as many other homeowners in similar situations still have not found new buyers.

On average, Mr. Pasalis found that homeowners lost $140,200 in property value over the 4.5 months it took them to find another buyer later in 2017, or in the first quarter of 2018, for a combined total loss of $121-million in market value.

“It tells you how rapid the decline was,” Mr. Pasalis said. “It tells you how quickly the markets turn.”

For Vicki Clayton, the cost of her failed deal was even higher. After a buyer agreed to pay $1.9-million for her North York tear-down bungalow in late April, 2017, the transaction fell through as the market plunged and the two parties couldn’t agree on a lower price. She relisted her house and it recently sold for $1.27-million, a loss of $630,000.

“It’s really a sad state of affairs but that’s what’s happened,” said Ms. Clayton, who is 66 and recently retired from her job as an office manager.

Ms. Clayton, who said her health suffered from the stress associated with the failed deal, has launched a lawsuit for damages for lost market value, as well as for the defaulting buyer’s deposit.

The GTA’s real estate market whipsawed from huge gains to rapid declines last year. Home prices were up by 34 per cent in March, 2017, compared with one year earlier, but plunged after the provincial government announced a 15-per-cent foreign-buyers tax in late April, falling 18 per cent in just four months.

The sudden shift caught many by surprise and lawyers reported an uptick in calls from buyers and sellers whose deals were in danger of collapsing. “In some cases, it was beneficial for the seller to just reduce the price, bite the bullet, get the deal closed without litigation,” said Mark Weisleder, a real estate lawyer.

Others have headed to court as angry sellers try to recoup defaulting buyers’ deposits, which are usually held in trust until both sides come to an agreement or a judge issues an order, as well as damages for the difference between their homes’ initial selling prices and what they eventually settled for.

In some cases, lawyers said their clients are involved in litigation related to two properties, as both sellers and buyers, as the domino effect of a buyer not closing on a seller’s deal caused that person to then default on their own purchase of a new property.

“It can be a chain reaction,” said Wendy Greenspoon-Soer, a lawyer who specializes in property-related litigation and currently has about 10 closing default cases already in litigation or heading that way.

For his study, Mr. Pasalis isolated low-rise homes that were sold on the Multiple Listing Service in the GTA in 2017 and then checked to see if they were later resold by the same owner before the end of March, 2018, indicating the first sale collapsed.

Mr. Pasalis and his team found 1,784 properties that sold last year and were later relisted for sale but did not sell, although they did not determine whether the seller for both listings was the same.

He also identified 122 low-rise properties that closed successfully last year, but were later sold again by their new owners for an average loss of $107,325.

“I don’t know if it’s panic selling or just that they’re overstretched financially, they think things are going to get worse,” he said.

Source: Globe and Mail – 

Image result for toronto home sales january 2018

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‘Dr. Debt’ issues dire warning to Canadians

 

Scott Hannah says low borrowing costs and rising home prices have lured Canadians into a debt trap they may not escape if looming economic threats materialize.

Hannah, president of the Credit Counselling Society, is seeing an influx of clients as higher financing costs begin to bite and people find it harder to manage. Phone calls were up 5.3 percent in the first quarter from a year earlier, while online chats increased 40 percent.

He says with debt loads at a record and little in the way of savings to fall back on, Canadians may be “caught off guard” if housing markets cool significantly or North American Free Trade Agreement talks go sideways.

“We’ve been in a perfect storm for a number of years” where low interest rates encourage borrowing and discourage saving, Hannah, 60, said by phone from the Vancouver suburb of New Westminster. “People have been lulled into a false sense of security.”

Hannah’s organization can help people set up a debt management program or find a licensed insolvency trustee. He’s sounding the alarm as rising interest rates and stricter borrowing rules threaten to squeeze households even further. The Bank of Canada is expected to raise its benchmark rate twice more this year and it’s next decision is April 18.

Credit Relief

Hannah’s colleagues dubbed him “Dr. Debt” after he received an honorary degree in 2012 from University Canada West, a private business school, for his “distinguished service in the field of credit counseling.” Prior to establishing the non-profit, registered charity in 1996, he worked for 11 years at Equifax Canada, a credit reporting company, but decided “a nice title and a good salary doesn’t make you happy,” so he left to find something that “made a difference.”

He found it by helping people get relief from their creditors. As Hannah tells it, during the early 1990s, the provincial debtor assistance program in British Columbia was cutting back just as bankruptcy rates were rising. A group of banks, credit unions and department stores tried and failed to establish a complementary service. Hannah offered to raise the necessary funds, so long as he was allowed to run the organization.

Drop in the Bucket

Twenty-one years later, the society — with offices from the provincial capital in Victoria to Ottawa — has assisted more than half a million people. The average client is 43 years old, has C$31,000 in outstanding debt and seven creditors. More than half are female. Average gross monthly income is C$5,200, and housing costs consume 42 percent of their net income. The society’s clients repaid C$51 million last year, up about 6 percent.

It’s still a drop in the bucket.

Canadian household credit totaled a record C$2.13 trillion at the end of February, roughly doubling since 2006, central bank data show. Residential mortgages account for 72 percent of that. The rest includes credit cards, lines of credit and auto loans.

People carrying large debt loads still feel ahead of the game because home prices keep rising, Hannah said. “What happens when the economy has a downturn, like in Alberta. We know what happened. We’re still seeing the impact of that,” he said, adding people in the oil-rich province were “caught off guard, and because of a lack of savings, many people lost their homes, had to sell their assets and start over again.”

Read more about cracks starting to show in the quality of Canadian credit

Some observers argue Canada’s household debt isn’t a problem because asset ratios and home equity levels are also high and the country’s labor market is strong. A report from the Canadian Banker’s Association this week showed the national mortgage arrears rate through January was 0.24 percent, close to the lowest in three decades.

Hannah doesn’t buy it. Low arrears and delinquency rates “don’t tell the whole story,” because a robust housing market is masking financial strains, he said. “If a person’s had difficulty keeping up with the mortgage payment, it’s been relatively easy just to sell your home,” said Hannah. “What happens though when you have a tight market and it’s not as easy to sell your home? That’s when you’ll see delinquency rates start to rise.”

 

Source:  Bloomberg News – 12 Apr 2018 

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