Tag Archives: mortgages

Deferred Mortgage Payments: A Credit Score Gamble?

Last week, the President of the Canadian Bankers Association announced that all six major banks would offer deferral payments on their mortgages and other credit products. Just like many public announcements over the last couple of months, many were left with more questions than answers.

One question that still has yet to be answered is, how deferred mortgage payments might affect your credit score? Equifax recently announced, “In the event that a [lender] makes a credit relief or payment deferral program available to its consumers to opt out of making monthly payments during the pandemic, Equifax’s expectation is that the [lender] would take actions on its system to ensure that it does not report any derogatory/missed payment information to the credit bureaus that is misaligned with the program it has implemented.”

millennials in debtScott Hannah, B.C.-based CEO of the non-profit Credit Counselling Society, was quoted in the Globe and Mail as saying, “I don’t see creditors punishing consumers for being as responsible as they can under circumstances beyond their control.”

Many financial professionals have been posting messages online and sending emails to reassure the public and their clients that a deferral payment will not affect their credit score.

I agree that Canadians should not have their credit affected by deferred payments, although I predict a much different reality for consumers starting April 1. Lenders update the payment history of each credit account electronically to Equifax and TransUnion.

In order for these deferred payments to not be reported to the credit reporting agencies as late, as Equifax alluded too, the lender would need to “take actions on its system to ensure that it does not report any derogatory/missed payment information to the credit bureaus.”

Lenders big and small have been bombarded with phone calls that have put pressure on their personal and electronic systems. Are you willing to gamble your credit score and assume that every lender has updated its reporting system?

Millions of Canadians have found errors in their credit reports. For over a decade, I personally have received thousands of calls from consumers stating that a customer service rep told them one thing, only to find out that it was reported incorrect on their credit report.

In reality, it doesn’t matter what the customer service rep, the government, or what the industry experts tell you. If the lender’s internal system sees it as a late payment, that is how it will report. No one will know for sure if all these deferred payments will report correctly or not.

might a mortgage payment deferral affect your credit scoreWe can all agree that the amount of deferred payments over the coming months is unprecedented. For this reason, I expect an increase in the amount of mortgage, loan and credit card payments reporting incorrectly on Canadian credit reports.

Even with the chance that a deferred payment will show up as a late payment, many Canadians will still need to take advantage of such programs being offered by banks.

For those that don’t really need to defer their payments this month, I suggest you wait until it is necessary. A deferred payment is not free money. You will have to pay the lender back with interest.

Any delay is just going to increase the amount on future required payments. My hope is that, going forward, underwriters or those reviewing credit applications will be lenient on any late payments during the COVID-19 pandemic.

However, I am positive that the credit scoring system will not show much sympathy. On average, one late payment will drop your score 20 to 40 points.

A low credit score, regardless if it was caused by an error or not, will make it much more difficult to qualify for best-rate financing, renting, some employment opportunities and discounted insurance premiums. This is not to say your life will be over, but it will take at least 6 to 12 months for your credit to recover.

For those who have no choice but to request a deferred payment, here are some ways to protect your credit.

  1. Request electronic or written confirmation that the payment is being deferred.
  2. Ask for the employee number or service rep’s name that confirmed your deferred payment.
  3. Write down the day and time you talked to the customer service rep.
  4. Place all supporting documentation and record keeping in a safe place where you will actually remember where to find it.
  5. Track both your Equifax and TransUnion credit reports for at least the next few months
  6. If you do see an error, reach out to your lender and the credit reporting agencies to open up a dispute.

mortgage payment relief announcedI’m sure the thought of making another call might be overwhelming for the hundreds of thousands of Canadians who have already spent hours on the phone to request the deferred payment.

For anyone who has something better to do than to spend hours listening to the annoying automated voice and elevator music, I suggest you start with suggestion number three.

I don’t want to create panic or be like Chicken Little saying the sky is falling. The point I sincerely want to get across is that reporting errors are common and always have been.

It is unrealistic to think there won’t be any errors as a result of the increased demand for deferred payments. Regardless of what happens, now is the perfect time to monitor and learn how to better protect your credit.

Source: Mortgage Broker New
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Consumers could face hit to credit scores, jump in payments from mortgage deferrals

‘You’re going to get hiccups in this process; it’s never happened before,’ expert says

Details of RBC’s mortgage deferral program, obtained by CBC News, reveal the option will be available to all mortgage holders but in a way that appears to ensure the bank will not lose money in the short term and may even come out ahead. (David Donnelly/CBC)

Canadians couldn’t get answers on mortgage deferrals at Canada’s biggest bank because information and eligibility requirements kept changing almost by the hour, a source who works for RBC tells CBC News.

When the first details were eventually given out to frontline employees at RBC’s Mississauga call centre, they revealed deferrals would be available to all mortgage holders, but in a way that appears to ensure the bank would not lose money in the short term and may even come out ahead.

“Deferrals actually meant that interest accrued from each deferred payment was being added back into the principal balance of the mortgage,” said the source.

“Technically clients would then be [charged] interest on top of interest for those payments [that were] deferred,” they said.

In effect, it’s as though the bank is loaning you the amount that you would have paid in interest during the deferral period and then charging you interest on that loan as well.

“They’re going to make more money because they’ve just loaned you more,” said Peter Gorham, an actuary with JDM Actuarial Expert Services.

“I don’t know that I want to say it’s profiting. I would say it’s not costing them a penny.” he said.

“People are increasing their debt load. If you are not desperate for the financial relief, don’t take it,” Gorham said, adding RBC and other banks are taking on increased risk from deferrals, a risk that could grow significantly if the COVID-19 crisis runs from months into years.

When it comes to repaying the increased debt load from a deferral, there may be other complications for mortgage holders.

“This also means an increase in clients’ payments at their next renewal period due to the increase in mortgage balance,” the source at RBC said.

RBC frontline employees at one of the Bank’s call centres were overwhelmed with calls and had no information to provide customers, a source tells CBC News. (Michael Wilson/CBC)

If the client doesn’t want a bigger payment, they can extend the amortization period, the source added. But that typically requires a full credit application which may affect their credit score.

The other option is making extra payments after the deferral period ends to bring the mortgage back down as quickly as possible to its original amount.

Two other big banks have mortgage deferral polices similar to RBC’s.

In an updated set of deferral FAQs posted on its website, Scotiabank too says interest will continue to accrue.

“You will pay more interest over the life of your mortgage, but a deferral will also help you with your short-term cash flow,” the banks states on its website. Scotiabank is also offering deferrals on personal and auto loans, lines of credit, and credit cards.

On its website, BMO also states interest will continue to accrue on mortgages.

The Canadian Bankers Association issued a statement late Sunday night saying, “Customers should understand that [a deferral] is not mortgage forgiveness. Mortgage deferral means that payments are skipped for a defined period of time, during which interest which would otherwise be part of the deferred payments is added to the outstanding balance of the mortgage.”

Credit card deferrals

RBC is also offering six-month deferrals on credit card payments, according to an email obtained by CBC News. But once that period ends the minimum payment would include all accrued interest from the deferred payments. Meaning the minimum payment could jump significantly.

A section of an email obtained by CBC News which was sent to RBC employees with instructions of how to respond to customers seeking a deferral on credit card payments. The email was sent on March 18 at 1:16pm EDT. (Obtained by CBC News)

Most minimum payments on credit cards are interest plus $10. But Quebec passed a law in 2017 changing minimum payment requirements in an effort to counter rising household debt by making people pay off more than just accumulated interest.

Minimum payment on credit cards in Quebec is 2.5 per cent of the balance owing and will eventually rise to five per cent.

Confusion

Last week, all of Canada’s big banks agreed to a request from Federal Finance Minister Bill Morneau to defer mortgage payments for up to six months for people suffering financially due to COVID-19.

The banks issued a joint statement saying they “have made a commitment to work with personal and small business banking customers on a case-by-case basis to provide flexible solutions to help them manage through challenges such as pay disruption due to COVID-19; child-care disruption due to school closures; or those facing illness from COVID-19.”

 

But initially many Canadians looking for deferrals said, after waiting for hours on hold, they were told they didn’t qualify. One BMO customer — who is actually a former BMO branch manager — said he was told he needed a full credit check and credit application and even then the bank would not tell him their criteria for approval.

It turns out the person he spoke with may not have known the criteria themselves at that point.

By midday Wednesday, workers at RBC’s Mississauga call centre still hadn’t been informed.

WATCH | Consumer frustrated at lack of information about mortgage deferrals

Watch

Confusion surrounds COVID-19 mortgage deferrals

Many Canadians looking for relief from mortgage payments during the COVID-19 pandemic are met with a confusing process. 2:00

“Anyone calling in to RBC between 8 a.m. and noon was directed to call back ‘later’ as we had been given no direction or timeframe as to when relief procedures would be implemented, other than ‘soon,'” a source told CBC News.

On March 13, the finance minister said that he had already spoken with the CEOs of the big banks. The banks issued their statement promising to work with Canadians on a case by case basis on the evening of March 17, around 7 p.m. ET.

Canadians began calling their banks the morning of March 18.

But, as late as March 20, Canadians were still being told no information was available.

“I was on hold for 11 hours [March 19] and then five hours [March 20],” said Lindsay Gillespie, who has a mortgage and a line of credit with FirstLine Mortgages, a division of CIBC.

Canada’s Minister of Finance Bill Morneau at a news conference in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada March 13, the day he told reporters he had spoken with the CEOs of Canada’s big banks. (Blair Gable/Reuters)

“I finally got through and was told there’s nothing that can be done right now, they don’t have anything set up. I was told to call back another time,” she said.

Also as late as March 20, some RBC customers were still being told they didn’t qualify for a six-month deferral.

“We called RBC and were told that deferrals are being assessed on a case-by-case basis and that our eligibility for a deferral is limited to six weeks,” said Jeff Hecker, a principal at a Toronto Marketing research firm.

“No explanation was provided,” he said.

In a statement issued Sunday evening, RBC said “the developments around COVID-19 are moving quickly and we understand that clients have questions. Our frontline employees are doing incredible work to respond to clients quickly and effectively, and we are staying close to them to ensure they have the information they need to support clients.”

Hiccups

Some in the mortgage industry say the confusion over deferrals is understandable, given the unprecedented and rapidly changing nature of the COVID-19 crisis.

“You’re going to get hiccups in this process; it’s never happened before,” said Robert McLister, mortgage expert and founder of RateSpy.com.

 

“It’s case-by-case, it’s completely at the lender’s discretion as far as I understand it. Even though the big banks have agreed with the federal government to offer these programs, there’s no mandatory federal guidelines that I’m aware of,” he said.

McLister says it’s possible some people are being declined mortgage deferrals because they can’t prove their income has dropped.

“But generally speaking if you are in legitimate need and you’re about to default on a mortgage payment the lender is going to work with you,” he said.

Source: CBC.ca – Aaron Saltzman – March 22, 2020

Senior Reporter, Consumer Affairs

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New York orders 90-day grace period on mortgage payments in response to COVID-19

The state of New York will allow some homeowners to skip their mortgage payments for three months in response to the spread of COVID-19.

On Thursday, the New York Department of Financial Services (DFS) sent a letter to mortgage servicers directing them to provide several relief options in response to the outbreak, including suspending mortgage payments for up to 90 days.

“As the outbreak continues to spread, a growing number of companies have started to warn markets about the adverse impact of COVID-19 on their financial conditions,” DFS said in the letter. “Companies in certain sectors are already laying off employees and taking other drastic actions in response to the crisis which is likely to cause more financial stress on local communities and consumers.”

As a result, DFS said it was issuing guidance to mortgage servicers to “do their part” to alleviate the impact of the outbreak on borrowers who can demonstrate that they cannot make timely payments. DFS has instructed mortgage servicers to support New York borrowers by:

  • Forbearing mortgage payments for 90 days from their due dates
  • Not reporting late payments to credit-rating agencies for 90 days
  • Offering borrowers an additional 90-day grace period to complete trial loan modifications, and ensuring that late payments during the COVID-19 outbreak do not affect borrowers’ ability to obtain permanent modifications
  • Waiving late fees and any online-payment fees for 90 days
  • Postponing foreclosures and evictions for 90 days
  • Ensuring that borrowers don’t experience a disruption of service in the event the servicer closes its office, including making available other ways to manage their accounts and make account inquiries
  • Proactively reaching out to borrowers through app announcements, text message, email or other means to explain the assistance being offered to borrowers

“The Department believes that reasonable and prudent efforts by your institutions during this outbreak to assist mortgagors under these unusual and extreme circumstances are consistent with safe and sound banking practices as well as in the public interest and not subject to examiner criticism,” DFS said in the letter.

Earlier this week, the Department of Housing and Urban Development and the Federal Housing Finance Agency issued a 60-day moratorium on foreclosures and evictions in response to the COVID-19 outbreak.

Source: Mortgage Professional America – by Ryan Smith20 Mar 2020

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Five Tips to Increase Your Credit Score Quickly

tips to improve your credit score
In order to qualify for certain mortgage and loan products, a minimum credit score is essential. Even if your score is sufficient to qualify, you might find the rates being offered will be lower than if you had a higher score.

Having worked with thousands of personal credit histories over the years, we have developed some strategies that sometimes give you that much needed quick score boostsort of like jumper cables for credit!

tips to improve your credit scoreHere are a few scenarios this might help with:

  • You are being pre-approved for a mortgage, but your bank or broker remark your score is too low and you don’t qualify.
  • You want to qualify for a mortgage AND a home equity line of credit (HELOC), but your lender says you need a higher score to get both.
  • You are working with a mortgage broker who is arranging a mortgage with a B-lender for you. She tells you that your interest rate will be lower if your Equifax Fico score is over 680.

And it’s not just about homeownership…

  • You are preparing your pitch to prospective landlords. These days, that often includes your credit report. Your chances will be better if your score is in the 700s or even 800s.
  • You want to apply for a personal line of credit or a high-end personal credit card, but your score is too low.

1. Use The Optimal Utilization Strategy

When maximizing your personal credit score, you should look at your utilization of available credit for each individual credit facility. By this I mean what percentage of your available credit is the balance being reported?

Percentage utilization can have a significant impact on your personal credit score. Equifax Canada states utilization has a 30% weighting on your personal credit score.

Optimal Utilization Strategy for credit scoreOne scenario: maybe a furniture store or a home improvement store offered you “don’t pay for one year.” The balance you are carrying on this card might be relatively small, but if it’s at or over the actual card limit, this is dragging down your personal credit score. Consider paying it off now!

Another scenario: suppose you have three credit cards, each with a limit of $10,000.

And let’s say one card has a balance owing of $9,900 and the other two have zero balances. This might happen because you are trying to earn rewards on one particular card, or maybe you said yes to a balance transfer promotional offer.

Chances are your credit score is lower than if the usage was spread across the three cards equallyi.e., each with a balance owing of $3,300, or 33% of the limit.

Overall, your usage remains unchanged, but now you no longer have an individual card reporting at 99% utilization.

If you can afford to cover or reduce the balance owing on the one with a balance of $9,900, you should see a nice little score boost.

2. Use the Statement Date Strategy

It may be that the best thing for you to do is simply reduce balances owing on your credit facilities. If time is of the essence, you should plan this carefully and do it in the correct order.

Gather up your most recent available statements for all relevant credit facilities. And note the day of the month when the statement was printed. Most of the time it’s the balance on that statement date that is being reported to the credit bureau.

And give or take a day, it is safe to assume that same day of the following month is when the next statement will be issued.

So, plan your payments accordingly. And allow several business days for online payments to process in time. If you are paying a credit card issued by your own bank, you should see transfer payments being processed either instantly or overnight.

3. Pay It Down and Keep It Down

pay down your debtThis is especially important when your limits are not very large. Suppose you are a model citizen who uses her credit card frequently, and pays the balance in full every month after receiving the monthly statement, and before the due date.

That is the “correct way” to manage your credittaking advantage of the grace period you are given by all card issuers.

But these days, there is little benefit to trying to use up the entire grace period because current account interest rates are so low they are pretty much negligible. It’s far better to pay your balance in full before your statements come out. You are even more of a model citizen, and now the balance being reported to the credit bureau will always be extremely small, if anything.

4. Exercise All Dormant Credit Cards and Lines of Credit

Some people have credit facilities they never use. People tend to favour one particular credit card (maybe we like their rewards program) and we might neglect our other cards. And most of the time we don’t even need our personal line of credit.

If you are trying to maximize your credit score, it is good to use all available credit fairly regularly, even if it’s just for a nanosecond.

It will rarely be correct to close these older credit facilities since they are contributing ‘score juice.’ Equifax Canada states your history can have a 15% weighting on your personal credit score.

These credit facilities can become stale and may not be not pulling their weight on your personal credit history. Update the DLA (date of last activity) with a modest transaction and then pay it online immediately. If it’s a personal line of credit, just transfer $10 to yourself and the next day transfer back $10.50.

If you notice you have credit cards that have not seen daylight for months or years, take them to the supermarket or gas station, use them just once, and pay online right away. After the next statement these cards will report the date of last activity as the current month and year, and that may give you some much-needed points.

5. Scour & Clean All Reporting Errors

There might be some incorrect information in your personal credit history that’s needlessly dragging down your score.

A few examples include:

  • You have two or more personal profiles with the credit bureau and your information is scattered and diffused. Combining it all into one credit report could well increase your score and strengthen your look. (This often happens to people whose name is hard to spell, or who have legally changed their name).
  • Late payments being reported when it’s not you. Maybe you have a relative with the exact same name.
  • That router you returned to the cable company is showing as a collection; but in fact you returned it to the local store.
  • You completed a consumer proposal and all the debts included in the proposal should be reporting zero balances and should not carry an “R9” rating. This generally means an account has been placed for collection or is considered un-collectible.
  • There may be incorrect late paymentsEquifax Canada states payment history has a 35% weighting on your personal credit score.

Mortgage brokers can fast track an investigation with Equifax Canada for you. What might take you two months, we can get done in a few days. Keep that in mind if time is of the essence.

improving your financial healthThe Takeaway

This overview is a fairly simplistic way of looking at your personal credit report and highlights initiatives specifically intended to give your credit score a quick boost. These tips are not necessarily the same as when you are managing for optimal credit health or interest-expense minimization.

Ideally, you are working with someone who understands all the nuances and who can help you determine what your priorities should be.

Source:CanadianMortgageTrends – 
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Hunting for your first home? Here are 5 tips from the pros

Fuchs gives a tour of his new duplex  which he bought for $292,000.

But first-timers may encounter a number of obstacles, from financial to psychological. Eliot Fuchs, 31, describes buying his first home in Newark, New Jersey, a two-bedroom, two-bath condo, as “a learning experience.”

One of his early lessons came when he lost out to a higher bid after his first offer. That sparked a realization, says Fuchs, who works in corporate strategy for Prudential.

“You’re not going to necessarily get it just because you put down the asking price,” he notes. “So if you want a competitive unit, like one in this building, you’re probably going to have to pay more than the asking price.”

Real estate investing:Is buying a property right for you? Here are six tips

Brian Nielson, right, helped Eliot Fuchs land a condo in Newark, New Jersey, after seven months of searching and placing bids on various homes.

When he eventually found a condo that ticked off all his boxes, he and his real estate agent, Brian Nielson, developed a bidding strategy.

“Once I saw the apartment, I knew that people were gonna want it,” Fuchs recalls. He says he and Nielson developed a plan for making second- and third-round bids, which prepared him for going above the asking price.

The condo, originally listed at $263,000, sold to Fuchs for $292,000.

“Having done it all, I’m happy that I did it,” Fuchs says.

Read on to learn five tips shared by Fuchs and Nielson about the first-time home-buying experience.

Get your mortgage preapproved

A mortgage preapproval – when a bank determines how much you are qualified to borrow – will help buyers zero in on their price range, says Nielson, a Realtor with Keller Williams.

“You want to make sure that you get preapproved before you start looking,” Nielson says. “That paper tells you exactly how much you can afford per month.”

Having preapproval shows sellers that you’re serious about making an offer, Nielson adds. And it can help buyers move quickly once they find a home they love.

“So when you do find something – ‘Bang, I want this property, here’s my offer, here’s my preapproval’ – the bank already knows about it and we can hit the ground running,” he says.

Fuchs gives a tour of his new duplex  which he bought for $292,000.

Hunt for the right location

Fuchs knew he wanted to move from Manhattan to Newark, where his office is based, because it would mean a shorter commute and more affordable home prices.

Nielson showed him homes around Newark, a city of about 280,000 people close to New York City, helping Fuchs narrow his search to three neighborhoods that appealed to him for their amenities and locations.

“You don’t want to ever regret buying a place,” Fuchs advises. “Cast a very wide net in the beginning … and spend a lot of time just looking at different places.”

It’s also important to know what you want in a home – and what you might be willing to give up. A home-buyer with children, for instance, might not want to budge on good schools. For other buyers, home size may be more important.

“If you want to be in a better area with better schools, then we might have to switch around what it is you’re looking for,” Nielson says. “Sometimes you want a bigger house, but in the nice neighborhoods you might not get that.”

Prepare for a months-long process

Fuchs says he eventually found exactly what he wanted in his condo but cautions that finding the perfect home can require months of searching. “That’s probably why it took like seven months to get it to find this place and get it,” he notes.

Nielson notes that many of his clients find their dream homes within two months but adds that others take six months or longer.

“It has to do with more of them not getting the offers accepted,” he says of the longer searches. “The product is there. They just didn’t feel that the product is worth the price tag.”

Fuchs chose to buy in the business district of Newark because of its close proximity to his job.

Understand the closing process

Once a seller accepts your offer, the closing can occur in about 30 days, Nielson says – or even faster “depending on how fast your attorneys are, depending on how fast your bank is with everything else,” he adds.

Make sure to budget for closing costs, he says. “Closing costs are everything outside of the down payment,” such as attorneys, insurance and other expenses, he notes. Budget about 3% to 5% of the overall cost of the home on these expenses, he adds.

Lastly, Nielson says an agent will walk the buyer through the closing process, such as setting up an appointment with an inspector to examine the property.

“The agent doesn’t cost the buyer anything,” he notes. “It costs the seller’s agent. We help you negotiate the deals and we get the deals done quickly and as fast and as securely as possible.”

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New report envisions a path for longer-term mortgages

New report envisions a path for longer-term mortgages

Increasing the length of mortgage terms isn’t just about allowing consumers greater choice; it could have the added benefit of enhancing financial stability, writes Michael K. Feldman in the latest report from the C.D. Howe Institute, an independent not-for-profit research organization.

The idea of longer-term amortizations got a lot of attention in the lead-up to last fall’s federal election. PC Candidate Andrew Scheer was particularly vocal about his intent to raise amortizations for first-time homebuyers, along with various real estate boards. Lengthening mortgage terms would also have a big impact on consumers as well as the overall economy.

Feldman first waded into the conversation regarding longer-term mortgages in 2018. He has since been joined by Bank of Canada Governor Stephen Poloz, whose remarks to the Canadian Credit Union Association in 2019 noted three ways that more variety in mortgage durations would contribute to a safer financial system: if more borrowers had longer-term mortgages, they wouldn’t face the risk of having to renew at higher interest rates as often; homeowners would have the potential to build more equity within a single term, giving them more options upon renewal; and fewer borrowers would be renewing their mortgages in any given year.

Feldman adds that longer-term mortgages act as a protection in the event of systemic instability.

“A significant downturn in the real estate market could result in the insolvency of some mortgage lenders, particularly unregulated lenders. If this were to happen, borrowers from these lenders may not be able to renew their mortgages if their lenders were being liquidated and may not be able to refinance their mortgages due to the downturn in the real estate market,” Feldman writes. “This would lead to additional defaulted mortgages, which could further depress the real estate market. This risk decreases with more longer-term mortgages because there will be fewer renewals throughout the amortization term.”

There are, however, some regulatory obstacles that stand in the way of longer mortgage terms becoming commonplace in Canada, and one of those is demand.

The government would have to provide incentives to both borrowers and lenders to jump-start this demand, and/or make some regulatory changes. Feldman writes that these changes could include revising the stress-test for longer-term mortgages.

“Since the main purpose of the stress test is to predict the ability of borrowers to continue to service their mortgages if they must renew at maturity at a higher interest rate, it would be logical to loosen the stress test for borrowers willing to fix their rates for terms longer than five years. For example, if the stress test for a 10-year mortgage was set at the contract rate plus one percent (or zero percent) without any reference to a “Bank of Canada 10-year mortgage rate” (in recognition of the added refinancing flexibility after 10 years compared to five years), then borrowers could qualify for larger mortgages by opting for 10-year mortgages. This would encourage them to seek out longer-term mortgages and require lenders to offer competitive rates to retain market share.”

Other changes include amending the Interest Act to reduce the pricing premium that a lender would have to charge for its reinvestment risk on mortgages up to 10 years and reducing that risk in general by giving borrowers a short-term redemption period; increasing covered bond limits, and developing a private residential mortgage-backed securities market.

Limiting mortgages to five-year terms is thought to have grown out of a 19th-century statute that allowed the borrower to pay off the mortgage with a set penalty of no more than three months’ interest any time after five years following the initial date of the mortgage. The practice then evolved to where borrowers could renew their mortgage for another five years after the initial five-year period, with that renewal date becoming the new date of the mortgage. As long as the lender provided borrowers the opportunity to “redeem” the mortgage once every five years, they could prevent borrowers from prepaying the mortgage in full during the rest of the term without penalty.

As a result of this evolution, lenders can avoid reinvestment risks associated with prepayments by offering mortgages and renewals with terms no longer than five years, Feldman writes. From a borrower perspective, however, if there were increased desire for 10-year mortgages and increased competition from lenders to meet the demand, the cost of prepayment penalties would be reduced.

The majority of regulated financial institutions in Canada fund most of their uninsured residential mortgages by accepting deposits, including GICs that are insured by the CDIC. The CDIC, however, may only insure deposits having a term of five years or less. This limit posts a challenge for issuing longer-term mortgages from institutions that rely on these deposits.

This hurdle, however, may soon be removed. The federal government amended the CDIC Act to eliminate the five-year term limit on insured deposits, which comes into effect on April 3rd, 2020. This, Feldman believes, should make it easier for federally regulated financial institutions to fund longer-term mortgages—in theory.

“This will depend upon the retail demand for longer-term deposits,” he writes. “In a flat yield curve environment, as we have now, one would expect that most retail demand would be for shorter-term deposits; however, once the yield curve reverts to a more common rising curve, a demand for longer-term deposits may develop.”

Ultimately, Feldman writes, the current five-year term is “too well-entrenched to be overcome organically” and that the federal government will have to modify certain rules and create policies and programs in order to change the status quo.

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Those who think they are financially literate may be a bigger risk

Many Canadians are taking risks with their financial security and some of those that say they know better are building up higher levels of debt.

A new survey shows that 67% of respondents said that they are financially literate but when tested two thirds are not repaying credit cards in full each month (30% believe making the minimum payment stops interest charges); 72% are not saving on a regular basis; and 43% are not tracking their monthly expenses or spending habits.

The survey from loan search and comparison platform Loans Canada also reveals that 46% of respondents are ‘loan stacking’ or taking on multiple loans from several lenders for emergency funds or just to cover everyday expenses.

When arranging a loan 60% do not call the lender and 38% don’t compare lenders.

Almost half of the credit-constrained Canadians carry high-interest debt in the form of payday loans (45%) and credit cards (55%).

“The purpose of this survey was to learn more about credit-challenged Canadians and the role their financial literacy plays in the financial decisions they make.” said Loans Canada CTO Cris Ravazzano.

Source: Real Estate Professional – by Steve Randall 24 Jan 2020

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