Tag Archives: multi-family residential

Buyers Beware: 3 Things to Look Out for When Purchasing Property During a Recession

  

viewing in a magnifying glass the design of a house layout / inspection of construction objects
As we enter into a COVID-19-induced recession, many real estate investors say that this is the time to have cash ready to buy properties. Good investors understand that there are opportunities during times of panic, but wise investors know the obstacles to navigate when finding some of these properties.
This article will focus on a few aspects of investing to watch out for when buying a property in the midst of an economic downturn.

Deferred Maintenance

Let’s be honest, there is a pretty small chance that you are going to find a well-maintained property with great tenants during a recession, where the owners just couldn’t pay for it anymore. Most owners of investment real estate who take great care of their property and have reliable, well-behaved tenants in place are doing well across the board—they also understand the importance of asset reserves and protection in times like these.

caution spray painted in yellow on cement

Odds are if you find a great recession deal, you’re looking at a lemon when it comes to deferred maintenance. This isn’t necessarily bad, though. You can score some great deals on these types of properties and turn those lemons into lemonade! Just understand that you will likely have some big fixes to attend to, because the sellers probably used every last dollar they had to just keep the ship afloat in the first place.

Have an inspection done on the property and be prepared to front a little more for capital expenditures. When it comes to reserve dollars, it’s better to have them and not need them, than to need them and not have them.

 

Non-Performers

Another type of property to be aware of is the classic “non-performer.”

These properties often show characteristics of poor management. Non-performing properties may consistently have problems obtaining rent, whether it’s from irresponsible tenants or pushover management. We have commonly seen this in properties that are fully paid off and have no debt service (often self-managed).

You can spot a non-performer by identifying lazy bookkeeping and shoddy maintenance practices. These properties are frequently sold by sellers who need help making ends meet. And if they’re in a pinch, you might be able to get a good deal.

There are a host of reasons why targeting these properties is a good idea in recessionary times, but just understand that you’ll have an uphill battle when you buy one. You need to have a plan in place to recover the asset.

Evictions

Recessions can really hit hard for people who live paycheck to paycheck. This can turn into a problem for investors who are purchasing property during a recession.

Nobody really wants to evict tenants because of economic instability and job loss—but sometimes it happens. And in some places right now, you wouldn’t be able to evict a nonpaying tenant even if you wanted.

tenant-red-flag

Now, that’s not to say that all properties are going to have tenants that are unable to pay during a recession, but there might be a few non-paying tenants that go “unreported” on sellers’ books to make the property appear more attractive.

 

You need to do your due diligence and dig deep to make sure that the sellers are not offloading a property to sidestep a hefty round of upcoming evictions that will fall into YOUR lap after closing. You can negotiate these things into a contract and help avoid some serious headache and financial strain post-closing.

Review the seller’s numbers and see if they match what the leases say. If they don’t, maybe ask to see proof that the payments were submitted, such as bank deposit statements. You need to feel confident that you are getting a property that has paying tenants.

It’s a tough pill to swallow if you purchase a property and then don’t have any rent coming in to pay the mortgage—on top of already mounting eviction fees—when you were planning to use the rent to cover expenses. So be sure to do your homework!

These are just a few things to look out for when buying properties in a recession.

I personally think an economic downturn is a great time to purchase assets at a discount. By applying a little wisdom, you can begin paving your path to financial freedom.

Recession-Proof Real Estate book blog ad

Source: BiggerPockets.com – Ryan Sajdera

Tagged , , , , ,

What is the best age to invest in real

What is the best age to invest in real estate?

Knowing the best age to invest in real estate is one of the most frequent doubts that those who are beginning to think about their future have. Especially because they see in the real estate area a financial security that other types of investment as the stock market no longer offers.

The short answer is that there is no right age to invest, but the sooner you do it, the more opportunities you will have to make money – and your investment will last longer.

However, it is true that investing is not a habit that we have all been taught. Not all of us receive financial education, and some do not even have the habit of saving money. We know that it can be difficult to do when you are young and you are between your twenties or beginning the thirties: travel, shopping, transportation expenses and fashion technology tend to monopolize the attention of your money.

Unfortunately, this lack of financial education ultimately affects the future. Especially when you decide to start investing and you realize how much time you lost because you did not do it before.

Why should we start investing as soon as possible?

As you will remember, one of our 10 tips for investing in real estate and not die in trying your purchase, is to understand that in real estate investment, patience is the key to success.

Something that guarantees the value of a property is the capital gain that it has, depends on the location in which the property is located. The capital gain acquires more value over time. That is why the big investors are those who can analyze the market and see beyond what is trendy. Imagine if 10 years ago you had invested in real estate developments in the Riviera Maya, or in real estate developments in Tulumplaces that are currently a magnet for tourism and foreign investment.

That’s why we say that the best time to invest is now; the more time you spend, the less chance you will have of acquiring properties at a lower cost that guarantees a high return on investment.

We must also consider that the responsibilities we acquire over time can make it more difficult to become a real estate investor. Marrying or having children can make you reconsider your expenses and how much money you can use to invest.

Each individual has different priorities and opportunities. There are those who see in their twenties the opportunity to promote a future while there are others who can invest only after their 30’s or 40’s. It is also normal and natural for some to think about investing until after retirement, when they have the money to do so.

Nor can we deny that each generation has different perspectives on what we should consider a priority and what not. For example, while for millennials acquiring experiences is a priority -as traveling- for generation x and baby boomers, acquiring properties is more important.

However, this does not mean that millennials – who are between the ages of 23 and 38 – have a chip that prevents them from being good at investing in real estate, on the contrary it is they who are changing the notions of success and ways of doing business and even as we think about work and lifestyle, this makes them less incompatible in investing in real estate, they are the ones who are beginning to consider investing their money to obtain financial independence.

For example, for the baby boomers and generation X financial security meant having a stable job and a fixed salary in order to save for retirement or get their pension. Today the notion of working from home without the need to attend an office is a reality for many people, as well as the existence of jobs that 30 years ago were difficult to imagine.

30 years ago it was hard to think that ordinary people could make money using the internet. Computers and the Internet were exclusive to those who were studying something related to technology. Today you do not need to be a hacker to be able to use digital platforms to make money like blogs or investing in services like Uber.

The orange economy – that is, the creative economy – allows retirement to become more possible at an early age. Which has also become possible because more and more people decide to invest their money in a smarter way – and do it at a young age – to be able to live on their investments and not have to be dependent on a job.

Years ago we thought that buying a property was to live in, today thanks to applications like Airbnb, more and more investors decide to buy apartments and houses only to rent them on these platforms.

You do not need to be a millennial to start investing. The technological evolution has made both applications and platforms as well as access to them, are increasingly easier to use.

For example, since 2017 Airbnb host users over 60 years have increased by 120%, while women over this age have become the best rated on the platform. Which indicates that even baby boomers see technology as an opportunity to get a better return on investment with their property.

What is the best age to invest in real estate?
Investing in real estate is possible at any age, but the sooner you do it, the more opportunities you will have to enjoy your money.

What is the best age to invest in real estate?

As we mentioned, not all ages or stages are the same for every person. For some it may be impossible to invest in their twenties and find the possibility of doing it later.

Our best recommendation is that rather than being guided byan ideal age you start doing it for the goals you have and the opportunities that come your way.

There are many myths around investment, especially when you want to do it at a young age, and one of the factors that keep people away from real estate investment is the lack of knowledge on the subject and investor stereotypes. We are not surprised when we hear cases of clients who want to become investors but fear not being able to do so because they do not understand numbers or be experts in the subject.

Knowing the real estate sector is one of the biggest keys to becoming a successful investor, this does not mean that it is a privileged knowledge that you cannot access.

Many millennials have the fear of investing in real estate because they think they need to buy a house to do so, and they ignore the investment possibilities that residential or industrial lots have.

For this reason, they fear not being able to do it because they believe that it is economically impossible for them, and they do not consider the possibilities of acquiring properties in other cities. For example, for some foreigners, investing in Mexico is a better option than doing it in their countries, but in the same way for some Mexican residents, investing in states such as Merida where there is increasingly strong demand in properties not only for housing but also for businesses and offices, it can be more accessible and profitable than doing it in places like Mexico City.

That is why it is important that you do not wait to have an ideal age and start thinking about becoming an investor or making an investment from now on. So the sooner you do it, the sooner you can designate your budget and create a work plan to invest or start saving money and then invest.

Otherwise, as you let time go by, you will be less likely to find suitable properties for yourself and especially if you have the opportunity to invest in places that are in presale in areas that will later have even more capital gain.

What is the best age to invest in real estate?
Millennials are redefining what financial security and quality of life mean, so real estate investments are becoming an option for those who want to travel or retire early.

How to start investing in real estate?

One of the most common mistakes made by young people who aspire to become investors is to obtain immediate profits and be able to spend them on whatever they want. But as you know, this is not possible in the real estate market.

Being an investor is a goal of many to be able to have financial freedom and not be tied to a job or to live experiences like traveling or living in different parts of the world, investing to earn money immediately is not an actual goal.

This does not mean that you cannot earn an income in a short period of time. For example, apartments near tourist areas can generate profits if you decide to rent them. The same happens if you acquire property near schools, universities or hospitals.

What we really mean is that if you want to invest to enjoy the results you need to be patient and prepare constantly about the subject.

The preparation on the subject not only includes understanding how the market works, but also observing and analyzing where it is going.

That is why it is very important that you start to know very well and read everything about the area and the developments that are developing in the city you are looking to invest. Find out about the market and how real estate works in the place. About the papers you must have in order and the types of credits -if you’re considering obtaining one- to which you can access.

Begin to consume information and observe how other real estate investors are generating income with their properties. One of the advantages of investing in real estate is that it is a safe investment, but it also gives you the opportunity to take advantage of your investment.

There is a lot of information especially now that we live in the age of the Internet, but it is always good that you can approach the experts and work with a real estate agent to solve your doubts if you are already thinking about acquiring a property. Ask everything you need to know about the property and the area: the places of access, the maintenance fees, the projection of growth and the amenities with which the development has.

What is the best age to invest in real estate?
One of the keys to real estate investment is patience. Real estate usually increases its value thanks to the capital gain, and this depends on external factors of the property such as the location and the services that are around it.

What factors should I consider when investing in real estate?

We already mentioned in our definitive guide of the real estate investorif you want to be successful when acquiring a property you need to analyze the location and interests of your possible market without letting yourself be guided by the trends.

Actually, what makes your property acquire value is the capital gain of the area. This depends on external factors such as the location, amenities and even the roads that the property has.

Mérida is a city that we love to take as an example because the boom that is experiencing is related to the intervention of factors such as security and the excellent location in an area that attracts tourists and allows them to have access to beaches and archaeological sites.

In the best cities to invest in Mexico we have also mentioned the importance of decentralization that Mexico is living and Mérida is an example of how the diversity of industries can be an important factor in the development of the economy and in the demand for properties and offices, and therefore is another opportunity to ensure your future.

The more diverse of jobs and industries, the more likely you are to be victorious in your investment, as in the case of a crisis, for example, the closure of a factory or a big company that is in the area.

That’s why we emphasize the importance of not investing where everyone is investing, in the end -it may sound cliche- you get what you pay for.

Many new investors make the mistake of acquiring goods in areas that, although cheap, end up being insecure. In the end these investments end up being losses because they end up investing even in luxury finishes in areas where house prices are quoted in an amount lower than what they are thinking of asking for, whether they are rents or for sale.

The capital gain depends a lot on the area, the location and the amenities. And even if you get a very cheap property, in the end you will not be able to generate income if it is located in an area where there is no capital gain or the market cannot access the amount of money you propose. You will lose more money, unlike you decide to invest in an area with a guaranteed gain capital, thanks to all these external factors that we already mentioned.

Another factor that we highlight and that you have to take into account are pre-sales. There is no better way to guarantee your money than buying before, remember our example of the Riviera Maya and Tulum? Now imagine how much it will cost to buy a housing development once it is popular.

Acquiring properties in pre-sale is an excellent way to invest your money, since once the developments begin to acquire capital gain, your property will have more value than what it cost and you can adapt your income according to the costs of the area or decide to sell it to a higher price, or keep it to get more return.

So, if you’re wondering what is the best age to invest in real estate? It is better to start asking yourself; how can I start investing in real estate? And start making a plan so you can reach your goals and start creating a safe economic future for you.

Source:  Peninsula Development – OCTOBER 28, 2019

Tagged , , , , , ,

How to Get a Reluctant Spouse on Board With Investing in Real Estate

indecision
Is the white-hot fire of real estate investing burning in your heart? Do you solidly know within your gut that real estate investment will be life-changing? Do you have vivid pictures of the freedom owning property will offer you?

Hmm, now how to impart that passion to your spouse…

You want them to see it as you do. You want them to feel as intensely committed as you feel. You want them to be as excited as you are. You want them to see the vision for your future.

Why You and Your Spouse Would Make the Perfect Investing Team

You can do this together. You have a lot of practice.

Now let me say, this may seem different than other decisions in your relationship, but actually it’s not. Really!

I say this because all types of big decisions like this in a relationship require similar elements. Among these are a bit of understanding, a whole bunch of open-hearted listening, a giant amount of belief, and a huge heap of trust in each other. I mean it!

Planning a wedding, having a child, changing jobs, moving, buying a car together, taking out a student loan, purchasing your first home, raising your kids—every one of these requires discussion and negotiation. The point is, every big decision obliges you to be there for each other’s excitement. But it also necessitates being patiently present for each other’s fear and anxiety.

Where to Start the Discussion About Investing

So, let’s step this out.

First, have you already talked to them about investing? If you haven’t, then that is where you need to start. And then keep the tips below as tools in your tool bag to make the convo go smoothly.

Young displeased black couple.American african men arguing with his girlfriend,who is sitting on sofa on couch next to him with legs crossed.Man looking away offended expression on her face.

However, if you have already talked to them—and they were less enthusiastic than you wanted or expected—perhaps the conversation had one or more of these possible outcomes.

You two discussed it and:

  1. They seemed open, but they were not necessarily excited about the idea
  2. They were fine with you doing it, but they don’t want to be part of it
  3. They have no interest, and they do not want you to do it at all

OK, so none of these three scenarios are what you most want, but they are manageable. You have managed to work out compromises on other large events in your life, right? You can do the same here.

Think of it as excellent practice for negotiating a complex real estate deal. (I’m not kidding here.)

Why Don’t They See the Potential in Real Estate That You Do?

Let’s get into the reasons, the “why” they didn’t feel your same sense of sureness and excitement.

When you negotiate with a property seller, your first job is to find out what they really want or what is holding them back from saying “yes.” And honestly, when you first start talking with a seller, you cannot assume that they even know or are truly “in touch“ with what their hesitations are. Nor can you be sure that, even if they do know what’s bugging them, they will confide their reasons to you!

They might be too embarrassed or ashamed to say them aloud—or even to admit them to themselves. Or it might make them feel vulnerable to admit their hesitations to you. You have to uncover objections by asking questions. You have to listen carefully and openly. You need to pay very close attention.

This is the same process you will use with a hesitant spouse.

Focus on Problem-Solving

If they aren’t overly enthusiastic to talk about real estate investing, be patient. Talk with them in a setting that is quiet and relaxed. Let them finish their sentences. Ask questions without anger, accusation, or judgement.

Remember, you are collecting information so you can solve the problem. Don’t make this an argument. Use your best puzzle- and problem-solving skills.

The solution to this puzzle is one of the most important solutions you will ever uncover. So, I repeat, pay close attention. Listen to the clues.

You are not just a “spouse” in this situation, you are a detective, a troubleshooter, an analyst, an entrepreneur, a visionary.

You see, if you can truly get to the heart of what is making them uncomfortable, only then can you begin to brainstorm solutions. Those solutions need to be two-sided, because when you can help your spouse feel better and more comfortable, you minimize their negative reactions and you increase the likelihood of their participation and willingness.

Related: Investing With Your Spouse? STOP and Read These 4 Survival Tips!

You also increase the possibility you will engage your spouse in your excitement about the opportunities real estate offers your family.

OK, after years as a therapist, I will tell you that when it comes to real estate investing, there are some very specific stressors, fears, and anxieties that people tend to experience. These usually boil down to one or more of the primary concerns listed below.

That said, no two situations will be identical. Your situation with your spouse will be unique.

If you review these potential concerns before you have the conversation, you can develop some well thought out and realistic solutions for how you can alleviate your spouse’s specific hesitations. Anticipating objections and concerns this way should increase your chance for a successful conversation and positive movement ahead in your joint real estate investing future.

Pick out the issues below you are most likely to face (or have already experienced) when talking with your spouse about your desire for their participation in a real estate investing venture. Write out the questions you might encounter and how you might respond. Note the trigger words you might want to avoid with your spouse—you know, the ones that tend to spark an unfortunate outcome!

Then, pick a time and place, and go for it!

Consider Their Fears

Money fears: The fear of losing money and being left without security or unable to pay the bills.

Not enough time: In the beginning, real estate takes time and commitment. As with all skills and education, it requires study, reading, practice, and repetition until it becomes seamlessly familiar.

Afraid of failure: Whenever we start new things, we run the risk that until we master the skills and knowledge, we may not be as successful as we want. But practice improves everything!

Uncomfortable with change: Some people love change—even crave it—but there are others who abhor change. Most of us are somewhere in the middle. But in truth, fear of change is almost as common as the fear of public speaking, which is the highest reported fear. The best way to deal with this concern is to just jump in and try. The sooner you start, the sooner the transition is in the past.

Not knowing who to trust/fear of being taken advantage of: Being new at something means listening to lots of other people’s advice, paying attention to tons of new information, and not knowing which is trustworthy and which is not. Practice makes perfect, or at least very good. So, the more you perfect your skills in listening to your gut while really hearing the person opposite you, the sooner you will know “when to hold them and when to fold them.”

Fear of getting started: When learning something new, it can be very difficult to decide where or how to “jump in,” and those concerns can be intimidating.

Don’t think they’re interested: Sometimes when we don’t know a lot about a topic or skill, we perceive it as boring or uninteresting. Then, once we are exposed to it, we may recognize that we have lots of talents that would make us incredibly successful in that area. But we don’t know until we try.

Afraid of handling tenants: It can seem quite daunting to suddenly have so much power over people’s daily comfort and happiness, but it’s not as hard as it seems at first. Start by giving people the service you would want (just that good ole “golden rule” stuff). Over the years as an investor, I have found that communicating with tenants, sellers, and buyers in the manner I wish to be communicated with goes a long way toward creating positive results, happy tenants, and satisfied colleagues.

No experience/“I don’t know enough”: No one wants to look like they are clueless. It never feels good. Word of wisdom: sometimes the honesty of saying, “I’m new at this,” goes a long way in getting people to warm to you, open up, and be willing to help you deal with any of the hiccups occurring in any new line of business.

Other investors will always be able to find better deals: It’s true! My answer to that is, “Yes, because they keep trying.” They keep networking to meet more people, they make offers on more properties, they talk to more sellers. Does any of that mean you shouldn’t start? Nope. Why? There will always be a “Joe Investor” who will do a deal and make $60K. That doesn’t mean that a deal you do that makes $30K is any less a good deal. Your wallet will still be VERY HAPPY! (This I guarantee you!)

Scared to get it wrong and look foolish to family and friends: This is a really significant fear for a lot of new investors. But are those same family and friends taking risks to build wealth? Are they investing in themselves and their futures by learning new things and creating new investment opportunities? Probably not, and therefore your willingness to invest and trust yourself makes you something special. You and your spouse are pioneers on the adventurous journey of increasing your wealth and building your own personal future success.

Related: A 3-Part Plan for Presenting Real Estate as an Investment to Your Spouse

New Skills Bring New Discoveries

So honestly, some of this list may resonate for you, while many of these concerns may not seem realistic or valid at all. It doesn’t matter. You yourself have your own unique worries and stresses in your heart and mind that your spouse does not share.

Your spouse has a different set of concerns.

We all have insecurities and deep-seated discomforts that can hold us back. But remember, if you can be there to provide support, if you can be present and caring for your spouse during these scary and exciting life changes, you are also very likely to discover the two of you are an amazing team that knows NO LIMITS!

Source: BiggerPockets – B.L. Sheldon

 

Tagged , , ,

The Least Discussed Reason Wannabe Investors Don’t Take Action (& How to Overcome It!)

I’ve never fully understood the obsession with figuring out why other people fail to take action when it comes to real estate investing.

It seems like a lot of people genuinely look for justification not to start.

“If Jimmy didn’t start because he had no money, and I have no money, then I’m justified in not starting yet.”

This is entirely the wrong mentality! Why not focus your energy on figuring out why successful people DID take action?

Regardless, I’m going to tell you the real reason some who are interested in investing never take action. It’s something that isn’t discussed very often.

But first, here are some of the most stereotypical excuses.

Why Some Wannabes Never Take Action: The Typical Responses

Don’t get me wrong. All of these excuses are pretty understandable—yet unfortunate.

Let’s briefly discuss each.

Fear

Fear is a beast. And taking the plunge into real estate isn’t easy.

That being said, everybody experienced the feeling of fear when they bought their first property. It may not have been crippling, but it was there. Anyone who tells you they weren’t at least a little scared is probably not being completely honest with you.

This is why it’s important to make decisions based on numbers and bounce the analysis off experienced investors. Don’t bring your emotions into the deal at all.

Emotions are dangerous—leave them out of investing.

Nervous businessman peeking over desk

Lack of Experience

This excuse drives me nuts!

NOBODY had experience before they took action—you gain experience BY taking action!

If this is your excuse, either quit or work under somebody for free to gain the experience you so crave.

This is a silly excuse to me. Just take action!

No Money

This is an understandable excuse and probably the most common.

I have been investing since 2015. To date, I have never paid more than 6 percent down on a real estate transaction.

Leverage is wonderful. It is risky but wonderful. I house hacked my first duplex for less money than most of my cars have cost.

Theoretically, you could sell your car and buy a house.

You can overcome the “no money” issue by utilizing FHA loans, VA loans (if qualified), seller financing, purchasing subject to the existing mortgage, partnering, other people’s money, hard money lenders, etc.

My point is this: While having no money is scary, if you have knowledge and time, you can invest in real estate!

male showing empty pockets implying moneyless

Not Enough Time

YOU HAVE THE SAME AMOUNT OF TIME AS EVERYONE ELSE!

Set your priorities, and either make REI a priority or find someone with time and provide money/knowledge!

This is a cop-out excuse.

I purchased a property while spending six weeks on a remote island and only having access to the internet through my cell phone a couple of times.

Figure it out.

Why Some Wannabes Never Take Action: The Least Discussed Reason

We have ruled out the most common excuses. And yes, they are just excuses.

Now let’s talk about the least discussed reason some wannabes fail to take action (and how to avoid it).

You’re LAZY!

That’s it.

The number one reason some people fail to take action is the amount of work required.

This excuse is behind the time, fear, and experience excuses. You know it’s going to take a lot of time and energy to make this happen. You’re afraid because it takes a lot of work, and you don’t fully understand what to expect. You don’t have experience because you haven’t done it yet.

In the military, there is a common phrase we use in combat: “Complacency kills.”

Although the meaning is a little different when applied to real estate, the message is the same. It’s not the one morning you sleep in or the one day you get nothing done that hurts you. It’s not the hassle you avoided today or the excuse you used today in order to procrastinate.

However, if you ALWAYS avoid hassle, procrastinate, and sleep in, you will never succeed.

Sloth is one of the seven deadly sins. If you want to succeed as a real estate investor, or in life in general, you need to kill the urge to be complacent—before it kills you!

Related: Getting Started In Any New Real Estate Business

Start Investing NOW: Here’s How

Goals

The first step to conquering the excuse of laziness is to sit down and set goals.

You need to long-, medium-, and short-term goals. These goals should be similar to a five-year plan, yearly goals, monthly goals, and weekly goals.

Think of the cartoons you watched as a kid where a rider would tie a carrot to the end of a long pole and dangle it in front of a stubborn horse/mule in order to motivate them to move forward.

Goals are the carrot you dangle in front of yourself.

No matter how driven you are (or aren’t), there will be days when you lack the motivation to do any work. At these times, it is important to have a carrot (goals) to chase in order to stay on track!

Pensive young entrepreneur looking at laptop screen and drinking coffee at table in cafe

M.I.N.S.

Some of you may have noticed I didn’t say you need daily goals. You may have even been bothered by this and decided to tune out (haha).

The reason I didn’t mention daily goals is that, while they serve a purpose, I prefer to think in terms of the “most important next step.” This is sometimes called M.I.N.S.

M.I.N.S. should be determined every night before you go to sleep. This will ensure you knock out the most important next step toward your weekly goal(s) first thing the next morning.

If you can knock out the most important next step toward your goal every morning, it will snowball into accomplishing your goals quickly!

The key is determining what this step is the night prior, and then doing it first thing the next morning!

Accountability

Most of the actions you take to achieve your goals will not be fun or easy.

It’s easy to find “busy work” to use as a distraction. This busy work is more fun and often easier than accomplishing the most important next step would be.

Since we are all human (I think), it’s safe to assume that you will have days, weeks, months, or even years when you fail to do the difficult task(s) that need to get done.

This is human nature and a hard habit to break. And this is why accountability is crucial to your success as an investor.

You need to find some people who are on the same path as you, as well as a few who are farther down that path, and get together to grow and hold each other accountable!

A common way to do this is through mastermind groups. A mastermind group is comprised of people who have lofty goals for life and are determined to achieve these goals. They meet regularly, whether in person or on conference calls, and talk through their struggles, successes, and so on in order to help each other progress.

These mastermind groups are great for helping you grow and holding you accountable to achieve more!

Mans Hand Reaching For Red Ladder Leading To A Blue Sky

Systems

Real estate investing isn’t easy at first (most things aren’t).

Imagine REI as a large flywheel, and every step you take gets it to move just a little bit faster. As the flywheel speeds up, it takes less and less effort to keep it moving.

This is the power of systems!

Every time you complete a task, remember how you did it. If you complete that task a second time, create a system for streamlining the process. The simpler you can make tasks in real estate, the easier it becomes to buy homes!

For example, one of my favorite systems to date is my Google Drive folder for lenders. Every time I have applied for a loan, I needed to provide the previous two years’ tax returns, W-2s, bank statements, photo IDs, verifiable income, etc.

I created a folder titled “Lender Documents” in Google Drive that has all of this information in it, separated by tax year.

Now, when I apply for a loan, I simply email a link to this folder to my lender and wait for them to tell me if they need any more documentation (which is minimal, if any)!

Talk about streamlining the lending process.

Don’t forget to create systems as you journey down the path of real estate investing. It will make your life so much easier!

Use Laziness to Your Advantage

Lazy people will often find the easiest way to accomplish a task. Use this mentality to succeed as a real estate investor—without losing all of your hair.

Real estate investing isn’t easy, but it is extremely rewarding.

Embrace your laziness, and use the safeguards above to continually attack your goals.

Take the time to put in a lot of work now. You will be happy that you did!

Source: BiggerPockets.com by

Tagged , , , , , , , , ,

Rental market braces for influx of tenants

 

Rising interest and strict mortgage qualification resulted in fewer Canadians seeking homeownership than rental accommodations last year, and 2019 will bring more of the same.

“It’s going to continue,” said Marcus & Millichap’s Vice President and Broker of Record Mark Paterson. “People will continue renting rather than dealing with residential mortgages. The rental market right now can barely keep up with the vacancy rate in Toronto, for example, being around 1%.”

Competition for rentals will be even fiercer this year in urban centres and that will push rents upward, creating a spillover effect into satellite markets.

“The rental market will see an increase of 8-10% because of demand,” said Paterson. “Unfortunately for people trying to find affordable housing, they’re looking elsewhere in secondary markets. They’re priced out of city centres, and that means the talent pool for jobs will end up in secondary markets.”

The Marcus & Millichap’s 2019 Multifamily Investment Forecast Report notes that apartment projects have become more financially viable, as evidenced by 60,000 units in the pipeline countrywide. However, that’s little relief given how few vacancies there are.

“The number of occupied units grew by 50,000 last year, outpacing supply growth nationally just as 37,000 new apartments came online,” read the report. “The national vacancy rate declined to 2.4%, the lowest reading since 2002. A shortage of construction workers, a long approval process and higher development and financing costs are slowing the delivery schedule this year, curbing completions by roughly 2,000 units from last year’s total.”

“Historically, Canada has been heavily reliant on condominium owners to supply the rental market, filling the void that purpose-built rentals have not been able to close. Prices have climbed substantially for condo investors, though, slowing this practice… and pushing more residents in search of housing to the apartment market.”

While secondary markets will enjoy the dregs of Toronto’s renter pool, the city will remain popular with renters. As the city has matured into a leading North American tech hub, the vacancy rate is under even more pressure.

“Microsoft, Intel, Uber and other companies have plans to increase operations in the city and bring on new workers,” continued the report. “Amid its solid reputation as a top innovator in tech and a mature ecosystem that supports the industry, the GTA will attract young professionals in greater numbers this year. Many new residents choose to rent, not only due to barriers to homeownership, but for greater mobility and to be near local employers, restaurants and nightlife.”

Source: Mortgage Broker News – by Neil Sharma 31 Jan 2019

Tagged , , , , , , ,

Five Ways To Tell If You’re Cut Out To Be A Landlord

 

Getty

Investing in real estate by purchasing rental properties can be a smart way to balance your portfolio, hedge against inflation and build long-term wealth. Not everyone is cut out to be a landlord, though — but even if you feel you’re not landlord material, you can get the same portfolio benefits by investing in real estate indirectly through a private loan fund or a real estate investment trust. Here are five questions to help determine if investing directly in real estate is right for you.

1. Do you have 20% down payment and 5% to cover repairs and unexpected expenses?

Buying a rental property takes a much bigger down payment than buying a personal residence. Most lenders want at least 20% down, even if the property will generate enough income to pay the mortgage plus expenses like property taxes and hazard insurance. Having another 5% set aside to cover repairs and big-ticket expenses, such as replacing a roof or an HVAC system, may keep you from having to dip into personal funds to pay for unexpected problems.

2. How will you handle renters who don’t pay and the possibility of evicting tenants?

At some point, almost every landlord has to deal with tenants who stop paying rent. Eviction is a financial decision with emotional underpinnings. When tenants don’t pay rent, you still have to pay the mortgage, the property taxes, the water bill and all the other holding costs. But sometimes, nonpaying tenants are families with children or have unexpected circumstances like a serious illness or accident occur, leaving them unable to pay rent. If it’s too emotionally taxing to handle the eviction yourself, you can hire an attorney to represent you in court and movers to remove the tenants’ possessions from the property. Before becoming a landlord, you should know that the possibility of evicting a tenant might become a reality.

3. How do you feel about other people using your stuff?

Landlords hold security deposits because damage happens. Carpets get stained, hardwood floors get scratched and there is a fair amount of general wear and tear that should be expected in and on your property. As long as the cost to repair damages doesn’t exceed the security deposit, there shouldn’t be an issue. The real question becomes, what happens when the cost of repairs required exceed the security deposit? How will you confront your tenant to address these issues?  If contemplating this (somewhat common) scenario is stressful, becoming a landlord may not be an optimal option for you.

4. Can you wait at least 15 years for your investment to pay off?

Real estate is a long-term investment for a couple of reasons. First, the transaction costs are high. Real estate sales commissions, state and local transfer taxes, appraisals and settlement costs all reduce your resale profit. Second, the length of your mortgage dictates the monthly payment. The longer your keep your mortgage, the lower the monthly payment.

 

Source: Forbes – Bobby Montagne, CEO of Walnut Street Finance

Tagged , , , ,

Why cash flow doesn’t matter

Although it may seem counterintuitive, cash flow is not the be all and end all of investing in real estate.

“Everyone has such a cash flow mindset, and don’t get me wrong, cash flow is amazing and will help support a different lifestyle eventually, but making those dollars year-over-year is where the wealth comes from,” said veteran investor Lee Strauss of Strauss Investments. “If you have an extra $1,000 in your pocket every year, the return on investment is dismal and doesn’t even add up. But if you take $26,000 year-over-year, now we’re talking.”

Strauss is, of course, alluding to tenants paying down a mortgage’s principal balance for the investor while the latter rides the property’s appreciation.

“On average for a single-family dwelling, the principal pay down is going to be about $6,000 a year,” he said. “The other reason is you have an income-producing asset that is hedged against inflation, and that income-producing asset appreciates, on average, 5%.

“If you purchase a $400,000 property and it goes up by 5% in one year, that’s $20,000 in the first year. Five percent appreciation plus mortgage pay down, which you’re not paying and will be about $6,000, is $26,000 in one year.”

Mind, appreciation is a compounding factor.

“After year three, you’re at about $460,000 on an asset you bought for $400,000, and it’s been paid for by somebody else for three years, so now it’s worth more. After three years, the pay down is $18,000. That’s why people have always invested in real estate; they just didn’t know it.”

Laura Martin, COO of Matrix Mortgage Global and director of Private Lending Hub, notes that the process by which equity is built can be expedited in a couple of ways.

“The first process is by lessening the amortization period and increasing the payments of the mortgage in order to pay it down faster. This means there would be next to no cash flow, but there will be less money going towards interest payments on the loan,” she said.

“The second way is to ‘force’ equity in the home by making improvements that will drive up the property’s value. It’s referred to as ‘forced’ because it doesn’t rely on the external factors of appreciation caused by the real estate market.”

Martin adds that the extent to which an investor ameliorates the property should be determined by how far below market value they paid for it.

Mortgages have some of the best terms available of any loan type, says Martin, and that flexibility can be leveraged to purchase more properties.

“At an average of 3.5-4% on a fixed mortgage with down payments of around 25% and with amortization periods at 25 years—coming across such favourable financing terms with other investments is highly unlikely,” she said. “There is also leverage, in terms of using the asset as collateral, to finance other properties, thus making an increase in net worth more attainable.”

Source: Canadian Real Estate Wealth – by Neil Sharma 24 Jan 2019

Tagged , , , ,

The 8 Things You Need To Know To Avoid Losing Money In Real Estate

We all know those people who frequently lament their decision to invest in real estate. Constantly blaming the market, or real estate as an industry, they believe the entire process is predicated on luck and timing, an exercise in chance. For people who have lost money investing, it’s easy to sympathize with them-but are their beliefs regarding results being beyond their control actually accurate?

Many who bought property between 2001 and 2007 lost money. These were years where prices aggressively increased, largely due to loose lending practices that allowed people to buy homes they could not afford using loans that were only temporarily manageable. Prices continued to climb until these loans reset, at which point houses fell into foreclosure, prices continued to drop, and the overall housing market spiraled into chaos.

But was this truly unavoidable or impossible to predict? Is it justified to live in fear of something like this happening again?

If you believe the answer is “yes”, you’re not likely to get started investing in real estate. The constant fear of an anvil dropping on your head like a looney toons cartoon will prevent you from ever taking any serious type of action. This will also prevent you from having any serious chance of success. The consequences for incorrectly assuming real estate investing is a gamble are grave.

If you believe the answer is “no”, it begs the question-what are the factors that prevent someone from losing money in real estate? Is it just a matter of timing the market? Is it found in getting only great deals? Or are there more pieces to the puzzle?

If we can understand what causes folks to lose money in real estate, we can take preventive measures to ensure it doesn’t happen to us. While no investment is without risk, smart investors understand there are certainly precautions that can be taken to mitigate that risk. In my nearly ten years of investing in real estate I’ve found there are certain steps to take that have a big impact on avoiding the wrong deal. I’ve spent a considerable amount of time listening, interviewing, and speaking with real estate investors. I’ve found patterns in what went well, and I’ve also seen patterns in what led to things going horribly wrong.

The following is a list of the things I’ve noticed often lead to catastrophe. Avoiding these mistakes will greatly increase your odds of real estate investing success.

Negative Cash Flow

If you want to make money in real estate, you should plan on holding an asset for a long period of time. Good things happen when real estate is owned over the long haul. Loans are paid down, rents tend to increase, and the value eventually goes up. The number one problem preventing investors from winning the long game is buying a property that loses money every month.

Don’t buy real estate assuming the price will go up and you can sell it later (this is an issue I’ll cover a little later). Nobody knows what the market is going to do. This is why trying to time the market is a bad strategy to base your decisions on. Instead, only buy properties that generate more income each month than they cost to own. By avoiding “negative cash flow”, you are protected from market dips or stalling home prices. You only lose money in real estate if you sell in unfavorable conditions or lose the asset to foreclosure. Ensuring you earn positive cash flow each month will put the power for when you exit the deal back into your hands.

For more information on how to analyze a rental property, click here.

Lack Of Reserves

If lack of cash flow is the number one culprit for losing money in real estate, lack of reserves is number two. Too many variables are involved in owning rental property to be able to accurately determine when unexpected expenses will hit, and how much they’ll be. Whether it’s an HVAC unit going down, a roof leak, or a water heater busting, there will always be something you need to repair or replace.

None of this takes into consideration evictions, destroyed property, and more. While you’ll eventually end up positive if you hold a property long enough, there will be times when your bleeding cash. Having a sufficient amount of reserves during these times is crucial to your success. Conventional wisdom suggests keeping six months of expenses in reserves for each property. While this number can vary for individual people with unique financial situations, make sure you have enough set aside to comfortably weather the storm when Murphy’s law hits.

Following The Herd

As Warren Buffet stated, “Be fearful when others are greedy and greedy when others are fearful”. While many of us know this to be true, the fact remains too many people still follow the herd. Many bad decisions are made when they are based on what others are doing, rather than basing them on sound financial principles.

It may be tempting to follow the herd, but understand it is a false sense of security. Just because everyone else is buying doesn’t mean you should too. In fact, it may be the opposite. The best deals I ever bought were purchased when no one else was buying. The only reason they were for sale is because someone else lost them who originally bought them when everyone else was buying! Make decisions on fundamentals like cash flow, ROI, equity, and a solid long term plan-not on what you see everyone else doing.

Betting On Appreciation

This is the number one reason I’ve seen for those who lose properties to foreclosure. Amateurs buy a house assuming it will go up in value and they can sell it later. Professionals buy under-valued properties in solid locations that produce positive cash flow. This gives them the flexibility to exit the deal when it makes financial sense to do so. When someone bets on appreciation, doesn’t have positive cash flow, and doesn’t keep accurate reserves, they are gambling on the market continuing to rise to bail them out from a risky investment.

Buying in Bad Neighborhoods

While we all know the first rule of real estate (location, location, location), there is also still the temptation to buy a questionable property in an area that seems too good to be true. When it seems too good to be true, it usually is. While homes in undesirable locations can look great on paper (read, in a spreadsheet) the reality is they almost always look better in theory than they’ll be in practice.

When you buy in an area where good tenants won’t want to live, you’ll be forced to rent to less than desirable tenants with lower credit scores, less reliable income streams, and a worse rental histories. The cons just won’t justify the pros. Having to pay for multiple evictions, destroyed homes, and theft will cause even the most stalwart investors to lose their cool. Avoid the temptation and only buy in areas where reliable tenants want to live.

Underestimating Rehab Costs

Whether you’re a total newbie or a seasoned pro, everybody makes this mistake. Experienced investors assume their rehabs will go over budget and over schedule. They prepare for this by writing these overages into their budgets and planning for them accordingly.

There is no use in running out of money with 10% of your rehab left to go! You can’t rent out the property and can’t generate income unless 100% of the property is ready to be dwelled in. Don’t be the person who makes the mistake of buying a property then running out of money before it’s ready to be rented out. Don’t bet on contractors, don’t bet on estimates, and don’t bet on numbers in a spreadsheet. Make sure you bet on yourself and have enough money set aside to finish your rehab, even if you’re told that’s unnecessary.

Planning on Doing The Work Themselves

All too many people have assumed they would save on a deal by doing the rehab work themselves rather than paying someone else. While there are some people who can pull this off, it’s a mistake to assume you can pay too much for a property, or not have enough in reserves to pay for the work, simply because you plan on doing the work yourself.

It’s been said “The man who represents himself in a court of law has a fool for a client.” The same can be said of the person who assumes they’ll do the rehab work themselves to avoid budgeting correctly. You don’t know which direction your life will take, what time you’ll have later, or what unexpected problems will be uncovered once you start the rehab. If you’re able to do the work yourself, consider that icing on the cake-just don’t count on it.

Failing to Educate First

The final lesson I’ve learned from those who have lost money in real estate is that they didn’t understand what they were getting into until after they had committed to purchasing a property. Certain decisions like buying a property, starting a rehab, or putting money into a deal, can’t be taken back once they are made. The time to realize you’re not prepared, or it’s the wrong deal, is before you pass the point of no return.

If you want to invest in real estate, that’s great! Start by educating yourself now, before you’re committed, then use that information to help you make the best choice possible. I wrote the book “Long Distance Real Estate Investing: How to Buy, Rehab, and Manage Out of State Rental Property” to help save others money by learning from my mistakes. I document my systems, strategies, and the criteria I use to make my own decisions so others can avoid catastrophe. This is just one example of ways you can invest a very small amount of money to save yourself thousands of dollars in mistakes.

Reading articles like this show a propensity for avoiding mistakes and saving money. I encourage you to read as much as possible before jumping in. Other resources include websites like BiggerPockets.com, podcasts, and online blog sites where you can learn from the wisdom of others.

No investment is without risk, but that doesn’t mean we need to live in fear. Start by avoiding the eight mistakes I’ve outlined here and you should be well on your way to growing wealth through real estate.

Source; Forbes.com –Real Estate

Tagged , , , ,

The History Of Toronto’s First Apartment Building

toronto first apartment

So many people live in apartments or condominiums in Toronto that it’s hard to imagine a time when renting a small portion of a larger building was a radical, even a shockingly salacious way of life.

Amazingly, before 1899, there were no purpose-built apartment buildings in the city at all, making Toronto something of an anomaly in North America.

Sure, people rented rooms or floors of sub-divided homes (The Ward, a notorious slum that used to be located near current City Hall, was densely populated much earlier), but nothing had been constructed specifically for that purpose.

The first building in Toronto purpose-built for multiple occupancy was the St. George Mansions at 1 Harbord Street, directly opposite where the looming brutalist mass of Robarts Library would later sit.

In 1905, the intersection was part of a relatively quiet and affluent neighbourhood west of the University of Toronto campus.

Dappled sunshine filtered through young trees and little Model T Fords lined the curb. It was a “a district of substantial detached villas,” according to Richard Dennis in a 1989 research paper.

Dennis discusses the St. George Mansions and the real estate market leading up to their construction in detail.

toronto first apartment

As Dennis recalls, the permit for the building’s construction, the first of its type in Toronto, was issued in 1899 to A. W. McDougald, the president of the Improved Realty Co. of Toronto Ltd. He estimated the building would cost his company about $100,000 – the equivalent of about $2 million in today’s money.

The six-storey pressed brick and Bedford stone building, roughly “C”-shaped with a partially enclosed courtyard, took about five years to complete. Many of its 34 apartments had access to balcony space, though some were decorative Juliet-style affairs with heavy stone balustrades.

In 1904, shortly after it was finished, it contained 34 apartments and was home to 99 people, most of them wealthy middle-aged couples. Three barristers, two professors, two bank managers, and a director of an insurance company appeared on the occupancy list at that time.

Toronto was slow compared to other North American cities to build its first apartment block. The living concept had already appeared in Detroit, Cleveland, Buffalo, and other nearby cities, and was established in the form of “apartment hotels” in Boston and New York City in the 1850s and 1860s.

Apartment hotels were typically marketed at single, city-dwelling businessmen. Buildings such as the New York’s Stuyvesant Flats, built in 1869, had “between six and ten rooms each” and were let for $1,200 to $1,800 per year, according to Dennis.

The buildings of this type often had a central restaurant, laundry, recreational facility, barber, and dentist—complete miniature communities for the residents that turned a handsome profit for the owners.

The living concept became less communal and exclusive in the later decades of the 1800s. Apartment buildings that were constructed around this time were private and self-contained and became accessible to middle class families.

toronto first apartment

The apartment building concept wasn’t without its detractors.

Observers fretted that apartment living was unsuitable for families, prompting one Milwaukee landlord to offer free rent for every child born or marriage proposed in his building. “It is a shortcut from the apartment house to the divorce court,” Dennis quotes the author of Housing Problems in America, written in 1917.

The St. George Mansions were targeted firmly at middle class occupants when they were finished in 1904. Economic evidence suggested middle income families were less likely to move and were more numerous than the upper class renters, making them the perfect market to tap.

Toronto’s rents spiked massively in the years the building was under construction – up to 95 per cent between 1897 and 1906 – in part due to a sudden uptick in immigration. There were more new arrivals than the number of new homes could accommodate, making apartment blocks and attractive idea for developers.

toronto first apartment

The second Toronto apartment building was completed a year after the St. George Mansions on University Avenue. The stone, brick, and steel Alexandra was a larger building: 72 suites across seven floors with panoramic views of the city from its penthouse windows.

Like the apartment hotels of New York, the property included a communal dining room and appealed to middle-class renters.

By 1907, Toronto had its first apartment building directory that included Sussex Court at 389 Huron St. and Spadina Gardens at 41-45 Spadina Road, both of which still exist.

The St. George Mansions and the Alexandra are both sadly gone. The former survived until after the Second World War when it was repurposed as Trinity Barracks, the Toronto home of the Canadian Women’s Army Corps.

One contemporary account described the building as “cockroach palace,” suggesting time wasn’t kind to Toronto’s first apartment complex.

Today, U of T’s Ramsay Wright Zoological Laboratories building, built in 1965, occupies its former lot.

Source: BlogTo.com

Tagged , , , , ,

IN FOCUS: Investor Services The importance of property management services for investors

Any savvy investor knows that building a success property portfolio doesn’t come without its complications. From problem tenants and maintenance issues to volatile housing markets, the challenges can sometimes seem endless. As a result, utilizing the skills of an experienced property management company is crucial for investors who want their investments to run as smoothly as possible and yield the best possible return.

“A property management company takes care of a wide range of essential functions including all of the maintenance related to the property, whether it’s tapping into a network of contractors to  handle the repairs or snow clearing and grass cutting,” says Rob Kirby, President of Veranova Properties Limited. “A property management company also does all of the leg work involved with getting new tenants, including finding them, doing the background checks, and then managing them when they move in.”

Property management companies act on behalf of the landlord and shoulder the tasks that fall outside of most peoples’ comfort zone. Finding a suitable realtor, offering legal support services, and inspecting the property if it is empty are all functions that fall under the management company’s remit.

“Many investors do not realize that if you leave a property for a certain period of time and something happens, such as a flood, the insurance may not cover it because it was vacant with no one checking on it,” Kirby says. “The property management company might check the property something like every 48 hours to inspect for things like break-ins and water damage until they get a tenant, which can take a bit of time if you’ve just bought a property.”

Property management companies play an important role in helping investors safeguard and maintain the value of their properties. “In the current economic climate, and with interest rates rising, it is harder to find real estate and harder to qualify for borrowing, and that makes it even more crucial for investors to make sure they maintain their asset’s value,” Kirby says. “A good management company takes a preventative approach to maintenance, which means issues are dealt with before they become big, costly problems. It’s an approach that saves the investor both time and money.”

Source: Canadian Real Estate Wealth – Mar 20, 2018

Tagged , , , ,