Tag Archives: real estate investing

SOUTHERN CARIBBEAN REAL ESTATE CRUISE – EXPLORE THE REAL ESTATE MARKET WHILE CRUISING THE CARIBBEAN!

The Caribbean has always been a much sought-after destination for purchasing vacation homes and villas. In recent years its allure has increased even more. If you are curious about buying Caribbean real estate and are unsure of which island or type of property would be the right fir for you then perhaps the long-awaited Caribbean Vibrations TV Real Estate Cruise may be the place to start.

Organized and hosted by long time Caribbean Vibrations TV host, Alain P. Arthur, join Caribbean Vibrations on its first ever Caribbean Real Estate Cruise from November 16.23, 2019. Sailing throughout the Southern Caribbean for 7 days aboard the Celebrity Summit from Puerto Rico to St. Thomas, St. Kitts, St. Lucia, Antigua and Barbados we show you properties for sale on each island that will help turn your dream home into a reality.
During the cruise, you will be immersed in Caribbean lifestyle while having the opportunity to dialogue with key real estate & business leaders at each destination. Experience cultural diversity firsthand during organized property inspection tours while connecting with like-minded individuals interested in investing in the Caribbean.

CARIBBEAN VIBRATIONS PACKAGE INCLUDES:
• Round Trip Cruise departing Puerto Rico on the Celebrity Summit, choice of cabin category
• All Cruise Port charges, taxes, and fees
• All meals aboard the ship
• Welcome Reception in Puerto Rico
• Farewell Reception onboard the ship
• Pre-trip Real Estate Cruise Information Package
• Half Day Property Inspection Tours on 5 islands including land transportation
• Fully hosted by Caribbean Vibrations Ltd. and international real estate/travel agents
• Exclusive CV Luncheon or Reception at each island stop
• Plus, Caribbean Vibrations Special Perks

TO BOOK YOUR CRUISE CONTACT:
Anne Brobyn
Hibiscus Tours International Ltd.
Tel: 1-866-995-5948 anne@hibiscusinternational.com

Alain P. Arthur
Caribbean Vibrations TV
Tel: 416-451-8596 apa@caribbeanvibrationstv.com

Click link to learn more – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N1bxT-NGIlg

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Fix & Flip Overview: How is the current economic environment impacting the market?

 

Deciding on whether or not to invest in fix-and-flip properties can be tricky, as significant benefits and challenges can influence an investor’s decision. The determinants of a good investment in fix-and-flips include the price you pay for the purchase of the property and the cost of the renovation. An investor must also be aware of the general health of the economy and the location of the property, according to a blog post by Allen Shayanfekr at Sharestates.

Understanding how the current economic environment impacts the market can help you get the most out of your investments. If the economy is bad, people resist purchasing homes, often opting for rentals instead. If the economy is too good, the competition for fix-and-flip increases, diminishing profits. If a property is in a bad neighborhood, it will be hard to sell while the cost to renovate could outweigh the investment in the property, risking the loss of some or all of the profits.

To better recognize the potential of a fix-and-flip, Shayanfekr establishes three metrics for ideal conditions when deciding whether or not to move forward on this type of investment property.

The availability and changes in housing inventory can significantly influence decision-making. Low housing inventory is perfect for house flippers, as home buyers have fewer good options, especially with new homes, creating a higher demand for rehabilitated properties. While some have seen higher housing inventory levels in 2019, others see inventory still in decline. It depends on the location. Either way, keep an eye on inventory levels in 2019.

Changes in the rate of home purchases also have a strong impact on investment decisions. The market is seeing an influx in homebuying, specifically with first-time home buyers. Though millennials have waited longer than any previous generation to buy homes, we are seeing millennials now buying or planning to buy homes. This upward trend is a good sign that the market will remain steady.

Fluctuation in the cost of homebuying puts additional pressure on the outcome for investors. Home prices rose 5.6% from January 2018 to January 2019, according to the Federal Housing Finance Agency. The increase in the cost of purchasing homes creates a challenge for many families, often displacing families with few options in future home buying.

While these metrics may not look great, Shayanfekr recognizes the value of the location as a key to finding a good investment property. CNBC Home Hacks writer Shawn M. Carter establishes the following markets as the top 10 states to invest in:

  • Tennessee
  • Pennsylvania
  • New Jersey
  • Louisiana
  • Colorado
  • Maryland
  • Virginia
  • Florida
  • Illinois
  • Kentucky

These states have an average ROI of 83-155% and an average flip of 180 days, making them ideal markets for fix-and-flip investments.

With the market in constant flux, it’s important to keep in mind that just because one market goes south, it doesn’t mean that another location or market can’t offer good opportunities. If fix-and-flip isn’t looking like a sound investment, rental properties are another area that is growing. Whichever direction you choose, remember to asset class diversification is key to building a profitable investment portfolio.

Source: Mortgage Professionals America – Ryan Rose 04 Jun 2019

 

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A first-time buyer’s guide to becoming a landlord

Photo: James Bombales

Buying a home isn’t always about finding the perfect place to raise a family or host those summer barbecues — for some first-time buyers, owning real estate is the gateway into the realm of landlordship.

Becoming a small-scale landlord can look easy, but there’s more to it than collecting the rental cheques every month. Whether you lease out an individual property or have a self-contained rental unit in your home, such as a basement apartment, buying to become a landlord requires you to be a hands-on business owner.

“I tell my clients upfront [that] you’ve got to think of it as a business,” says Nawar Naji, a Toronto real estate investor and broker at Chestnut Park Real Estate. “It’s not just about, ‘Let’s go buy a condo and rent it out.’ You’ve got to think of it from a business perspective. Think of the operation side of it, taxation aspect of it, and the other part of it — the exit.”

Want to buy your first home?

With television shows like HGTV’s Income Property showcasing the benefits of owning a rental property, like easy income and a boost in property value, renting out your basement looks appealing. Yet, without proper preparation or knowledge of provincial landlord and tenancy laws, the landlord dream can quickly go sour.

“If people have a bad experience in the first year [of landlording], and the first tenancy is problem-ridden, nine times out of 10 I would think they would get out of the business,” says Susan Wankiewicz, executive director of the Landlord’s Self-Help Centre, a non-profit legal clinic for Ontario’s small landlords.

If you do your homework and plan accordingly, becoming a small landlord can be rewarding. As Naji and Wankiewicz tell it, here’s what you can expect if you’re working towards that first investment property.

Put your back into it

Landlording isn’t a passive investment — it requires maintenance, time and experience to nurture into a successful money-maker. As with any business, being present and aware of your investment’s unique needs will start you on the path to being a successful landlord.

“You’ve got to be active in the business,” says Naji. “It’s not just paying the mortgage, getting the rental cheque and calling it a day. There’s more work to be done to it.”

Naji, who has been investing in real estate since 2006, says a new landlord can expect the operation stage of landlording — running the property — to be the longest and most cumbersome. Semi-annual inspections, repairs, collecting rent and regular maintenance are the landlord’s responsibility. You could hire a property management company to take care of this for you for a percentage of your rental earnings, but Naji advises not to within the first year of a new investment property.

Photo: Julien Dumont/ Flickr

“[That way] when you pass it on to a property manager, and they call you [about a house issue], you’ll understand if it makes sense or doesn’t make sense,” he says. “If you haven’t done it by experience, somebody can call you and can come up with explanations that don’t necessarily make sense — it might not need any repairs.”

Naji also recommends building a team of professionals that specialize in residential investments. Your accountant, repair person or real estate agent, he says, should have knowledge of landlording in order to fully understand your needs.

Know it like the back of your hand

Legal jargon may be a dry read, but understanding tenancy laws in-depth before you become a landlord could save you a whole lot of trouble down the road.

“Usually we meet landlords once they’ve rented and they’re in trouble,” says Wankiewicz. “If they were to do the front-end research and understand what they’re getting into before they rent, I think they’d be better off.”

Wankiewicz has seen every kind of problem come through the LSHC office: tenants that default on rent; pets that suddenly appear unannounced; damage to the property; and tenants that decided to move their whole extended family into the unit. Whatever the issue may be, Wankiewicz explains that landlords who familiarize themselves with the provincial landlord and tenancy laws beforehand have a better understanding of what their rights are. For instance, she still encounters landlords who haven’t fully read Ontario’s Residential Tenancies Actand don’t understand that the law equally applies to both high-rise and second suite rentals.

“Landlords are surprised because they think that [because] they’re renting in their home and they’re the king of the castle. That’s not the case. They’re subject to the same legislation as if it were a high rise rental,” she says.

Photo: James Bombales

If a tenancy isn’t working out and an eviction is required, Wankiewicz warns that the process isn’t a quick fix. If a tenant stops paying rent, a landlord will need to give a termination notice and apply for a court hearing to the Landlord and Tenant Board as soon as possible.

“What we are seeing now is that it’s taking anywhere from four to six months for a landlord to terminate the tenancy and recover possession of the rental unit,” she says.

The price is right

Buying a house ain’t cheap, nor is saving for a downpayment, so you’ll want to ensure that you can get a return on your first investment property, and it starts with picking the right rental unit.

Naji says to follow the money — wherever there’s construction for a master-planned community or an injection of government funding into infrastructure, there will be a demand for rental housing. Highlights of a specific neighbourhood — proximity to transit, a family-friendly community, lots of amenities — will entice tenants over more space. As Naji explains, buying the largest rental unit on the market might allow you to charge slightly higher rent, but it will cost you more to purchase.

Photo: James Bombales

“If you’re buying the largest two-bedroom, two-bathroom condo, it’s not necessarily the best idea because the tenants are not going to pay more rent,” explains Naji. “They might pay a little more rent, but not enough to justify the additional cost of acquisition for that larger, or extra large, unit.”

Instead of focusing on big bedrooms and living areas, Naji says to look for smaller spaces with appealing characteristics. Tenants are feature focused; they’ll value better appliances or a shorter commute time over a bigger kitchen. A semi-detached could bring you in the same amount of money as a fully-detached home with the same number of bedrooms, but will cost you less to buy.

“It might be a little bit smaller, but your cost of acquisition is less, and the numbers are going the be in your favour because your rent is going to be pretty much the same with a lower purchase price,” he says.

When pricing your rental unit, Naji says to compare current neighbourhood rental prices with seasonal demand to determine the right price.

Meet and greet

With a tenant living on your property, you’ll get to know all of their quirks very quickly. Some landlords aren’t prepared for the extra smells, sounds and interesting habits on display that go hand in hand with having a tenant.

“Landlords in a smaller situation, were they’re renting part of their home, they become consumed with tenant behaviour, like if the tenant has an overnight guest and, ‘They didn’t tell me’, ‘The tenant’s taking too many showers’, or ‘The tenant’s leaving the lights on’, or ‘They brought in a pet and I didn’t approve a pet’— issues like that, small-living landlords are unprepared for,” says Wankiewicz.

The landlord-tenant relationship can sometimes be a rocky one. Wankiewicz emphasizes that in addition to good communication and responding to issues quickly, landlords need to conduct a comprehensive screening process to find a trustworthy tenant. She advises that going off face-value alone won’t provide enough information about a person. Using a rental application, speaking to references and checking a tenant applicant’s credit score are good methods to finding a quality tenant.

“So many times the small landlord will just make their decision on how their tenant appears, but they need to dig in and check with previous landlords, not just where they’re living now, but where they lived prior to that, because that’s where they’re going to get accurate information about what their behaviour was like,” says Wankiewicz.

Naji likes to take a personal approach to rental applications; he strongly recommends meeting prospective tenants in-person not only to check for that gut-feeling, but to get to know the person.

“At the end of the day, this is a people business. You’re renting your property to a person or a couple. It’s good to meet them, get to know who they are.”

Source: Livabl.com –  

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9 tips for buying profitable investment condos in Toronto

Photo: Jenny Henderson

Real estate is not a one-size-fits-all strategy. Pierre Carapetian, a top 1 percent agent in Toronto and an avid real estate investor himself, shares what we should know about buying an investment property in Toronto. Here are his tips to profitable purchases.

1. Understand your goals

The type of product you invest in will depend on your goals as an investor. Are you investing for equity gains or are you looking for an investment that generates cash flow?

Cash Flow

Toronto’s lucrative condo market and rising interest rates have raised carrying costs, making it more challenging to find cash-flow positive properties. There are, however, strategic ways to improve your margins, like a higher downpayment or purchasing the right product. Your Realtor will know best.

Type of property to invest in: Resale

Equity Gains

If it’s equity gains you’re after, you’ll need to think long-term. Toronto condos are a great option as prices in the core have been stable and rising substantially. An experienced Realtor can help guide you to the right product and the right neighbourhood so that you can achieve higher equity gains.

Type of property to invest in: resale or pre-construction

2. Know your budget and closing costs

Ensure you know how much cash you will need and how much mortgage you can afford to carry. This will influence the types of properties to evaluate when investing. If this is your principal residence you are allowed to purchase with as little as 5 percent down. However, as an investor purchasing a secondary property you must have at least 20 percent down.

5 Percent vs. 20 Percent Downpayment

Different products have different downpayment structures:

Type of property to invest in with < 20 percent downpayment: resale
Type of property to invest in with 20 percent + downpayment: resale or pre-construction

Closing Expenses

Beyond your downpayment, you’ll also need to account for closing expenses. These include Land Transfer Taxes and, on pre-construction condos specifically, HST (capped at $24,000).

Use this Land Transfer Tax Calculator to find out how much you’ll owe. First-time buyers are also eligible for a partial Land Transfer Tax rebate.

When investing in a pre-construction condo, you’ll need to pay HST on the registration date (approximately four years after purchase) to a maximum of $24,000. With a one year lease in place though, this amount is fully refundable as you’re able to file for a full HST rebate.

3. Understanding price per square foot averages in the neighbourhood

Paying attention to the price per square foot is a great indicator of an investment’s profit potential. Look for properties that have a low price per square foot compared to a comparable unit trading in that same neighbourhood. This will also help you determine if the best deal is pre-construction or resale.

“If the average resale condo in King West is trading for $900 per square foot and the current pre-construction deal is selling for $1,100 per square foot, you’re likely going to generate higher returns investing in resale,” says Pierre.

Photo: Jenny Henderson

4. Know how to spot a good deal

Beyond the price per square foot, there are many other factors to consider when spotting a profitable investment condo. Some of these include:

  • Does the builder have a good reputation?
  • Does the location or floorplan allow you to rent for a premium?
  • Is there future infrastructure development coming to the area?

We aren’t all real estate whisperers — if you don’t know how to spot a good deal, or maybe don’t have the time, hire an experienced Realtor to help you.

“I’m always scouring the market for profitable purchases that I can send along to my investor clients.”

5. Purchase investments where you can charge a premium in rent

There are key factors to look for as you search that will help guide you to a profitable investment property.

Rental prices favour condos along major transit/subway lines. You can also typically charge about the same rent for a two-bed, two-bath, 750-square-foot condo as you would a two-bed, two-bath 800-square-foot condo if they are in the same building. That 750-square-foot condo, however, will cost less to purchase, so you actually will improve your margins and lower your carrying costs.

6. Buy in gentrifying neighbourhoods

When it comes to equity gains, the biggest wins to be had are in pre-construction properties in up-and-coming neighbourhoods. If you can invest in areas when prices are low, you’ll reap the benefits in years to come as the area becomes more desirable.

Leslieville is a great example of how gentrification impacts property values. Condo prices there have increased 50 percent since 2014.* Investment opportunities in up-and-coming neighbourhoods where rental inventory is low will also allow you to charge a premium in rent.

PRO-TIP: Be on the look-out for investment opportunities on the Danforth along the subway line.

7. When purchasing, think long-term

When it comes to investing, it’s always wise to think long-term. The longer you hold your investment, the more equity you amass. As your investment’s market value goes up and your mortgage goes down, you’re able to leverage that equity into other investment condos. Learn about Pierre’s leveraging strategy and building a real estate portfolio.

PRO-TIP: Borrowing to invest can dramatically improve ROI.

8. Understand the tax implications

Knowing how your investment will affect your taxes — and the amount you owe — can make all the difference when purchasing property.

Capital Gains

When you sell your investment property, you are required to pay Capital Gains Tax. This means that 50 percent of your net profit will become taxable income. You are entitled to deduct expenses incurred during the investment from these gains (like interest on a loan and cash-flow losses).

HST

As we mentioned earlier, when investing in a pre-construction condo you’ll need to pay HST to a maximum of $24,000 when the building registers with the city (typically four years after your initial purchase). Your lawyer can file for a full HST rebate, refunded approximately four to six weeks later, provided you have a one year lease in place.

If you do not rent out your property for the minimum one year, you are not eligible for the HST rebate.

9. Ensure you’re playing by the rules

Ensure you play by the rules when investing. This includes understanding the rules regarding short-term rentals (eg. Airbnb) in the building to flipping condos and the financial consequences that come with it.

If you sell your investment too quickly you run the risk of being taxed as a trader rather than as an investor, which means you can be taxed on 100 percent of your profits as it’s seen as business income. It is best to get legal and property advice from your lawyer and/or accountant regarding tax implications as a flipper.

When it comes to spotting profitable investment opportunities in Toronto, just remember: it’s not about buying something, it’s about buying the right thing. Equipped with these nine investment tips, you can rest assured you’ve invested with sound advice and guidance from one of Toronto’s top real estate brokers.

You can read more on Pierre’s investment strategies here.

*Based on E01’s average condo price for 2018 compared to 2014

 

Source: Livabl.com – Feb 11, 2019

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Naborly protects landlords’ investments

As every landlord surely knows, running a credit check during the tenant selection process is paramount. However, not every landlord realizes what to do with the information the credit check reveals.

“Every independent landlord knows that to screen a tenant, you have to look at their credit, but a lot of them have no idea how credit relates to a tenant’s ability to pay rent on time,” said Jerome Werniuk, director of sales at Naborly Inc., which runs free credit and background checks. “Ninety-five percent of landlords have tenants show up with their own credit file, meaning they go to Credit Karma or Equifax, but when we hear professional tenant stories, these people come with doctored credit checks.

Doctoring a credit check is as easy as finding a template online and filling it in as one wishes. It’s what Werniuk describes as a huge problem within the industry.
While savvy landlords realize they can obtain credit checks from Equifax or TransUnion, many still don’t know, nor have time, to mine the information therein to decipher a tenant’s capacity for prompt rent payments.

“To get a credit file from either of the credit bureaus, they have to pay for it and a set-up fee for the individual’s report, but there’s a heavy credentialing process to pull somebody’s file,” said Werniuk. “Even when the landlord gets a credit file, they don’t know how to read it. They don’t know exactly what an R9 is or how someone paying a cell phone bill on time impacts their ability to pay rent. So credit is not necessarily a good tool for independent landlords.”

Naborly builds a different type of credit report using critical criteria like contemporary cost of living and verifiable income to determine a potential tenant’s ability to pay rent. It has proven so popular that, when it launched in February 2018, Naborly screened 100 people a week. Now, it screens at least that many people in a day.

“The biggest feedback we’ve received from landlords is our tool is amazing at assessing risk so that they can properly evaluate whether or not to accept the rental application,” said Werniuk. However, there remain risks that are extremely difficult to predict. Landlords have said that many of their previous evictions  were due to circumstances that changed after the tenant moved in, like job loss or some other unforeseen, and expensive, event in their lives. Nobody can predict those things.”

The average cost of eviction in Ontario is $9,000, and that could cripple an investment. In response, Naborly has rolled out Rent Guarantee, which doesn’t just risk assess but also protects the landlord for the full term of the lease. In effect, Naborly cats as the tenant’s co-signor, which shields the landlord’s investment.

“It’s based on the Naborly report and the risk score we give, which directly correlates to a tenant defaulting on rent,” said Werniuk. “We give a quote for how much rent guarantee will cost. They can have Naborly become a guarantor on the lease, meaning if the tenant ever defaults then Naborly steps in and covers the rent for up to six months. Our primary customer for Rent Guarantee is the landlord who only owns one or two units because if they don’t collect rent for two or three months, they’ll have issues paying their mortgages and they could lose the property.”

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How to ‘plan, invest and retire wealthy’

What if condo investing were as easy as owning a mutual fund? Well, it can be.

Connect Asset Management will be at the Investor Forum on March 2 to explain how it helps its clients turn one property into several and build portfolios that cash flow millions of dollars. One of the ways in which Connect Asset Management does that is by helping investor clients access to some of the most exclusive real estate developments in Ontario.

“We help investors plan, invest and retire wealthy with cash flow in condos,” said real estate broker and founder of Connect Asset Management Ryan Coyle. “It’s completely hands-off for our clients; we make investing in real estate as easy as owning a mutual fund.”

Connect Asset Management builds a strategy for its clients predicated on timing—that is, strategically choosing when to purchase a property.

“From acquisition to completion, there’s a tremendous amount of growth on capital appreciation and rental appreciation, so when the condo is built they have all this appreciation that gives them the ability to refinance, pull out the equity and buy more property,” said Coyle. “We help our clients identify the optimal time to flow that capital into more properties.”

The strategy, which Connect Asset Management will decode at the Investor Forum, is called the Multiplier Effect: The ability to use equity in a safe, not to mention lucrative, way. Coyle says that, with the right strategy, anyone can become a millionaire through investing in real estate.

For starters, ever wonder why the best units in key developments are gone well before sales open to the public?

“We’ve been a top-producing team for many years now and what that means for us is we get to access all the best developments, and we get our clients first access to all the developments before they open to general public and, quite frankly, before anyone even knows about them,” continued Coyle. “This way, our clients are able to get the best deals on the best units.”

Condominiums are far from Connect Asset Management’s sole investment strategy. The firm identifies key markets where yields remunerate clients well, and some of them include university towns with high enrollment but meagre student lodgings.

“Student housing is often referred to as ‘recession-free real estate,’ meaning that when recessions hit student housing tends to be among the strongest real estate because more people go back to school and that increases the demand on both the rental and resale side. The areas we invest in are seeing some of the highest enrollment rates in the country, and Canadian schools have a shortage of on-campus housing, so there’s a new demand for student living, such as condos.”

Source: Canadian Real Estate Magazine – by Neil Sharma  07 Feb 2019

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Five Ways To Tell If You’re Cut Out To Be A Landlord

 

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Investing in real estate by purchasing rental properties can be a smart way to balance your portfolio, hedge against inflation and build long-term wealth. Not everyone is cut out to be a landlord, though — but even if you feel you’re not landlord material, you can get the same portfolio benefits by investing in real estate indirectly through a private loan fund or a real estate investment trust. Here are five questions to help determine if investing directly in real estate is right for you.

1. Do you have 20% down payment and 5% to cover repairs and unexpected expenses?

Buying a rental property takes a much bigger down payment than buying a personal residence. Most lenders want at least 20% down, even if the property will generate enough income to pay the mortgage plus expenses like property taxes and hazard insurance. Having another 5% set aside to cover repairs and big-ticket expenses, such as replacing a roof or an HVAC system, may keep you from having to dip into personal funds to pay for unexpected problems.

2. How will you handle renters who don’t pay and the possibility of evicting tenants?

At some point, almost every landlord has to deal with tenants who stop paying rent. Eviction is a financial decision with emotional underpinnings. When tenants don’t pay rent, you still have to pay the mortgage, the property taxes, the water bill and all the other holding costs. But sometimes, nonpaying tenants are families with children or have unexpected circumstances like a serious illness or accident occur, leaving them unable to pay rent. If it’s too emotionally taxing to handle the eviction yourself, you can hire an attorney to represent you in court and movers to remove the tenants’ possessions from the property. Before becoming a landlord, you should know that the possibility of evicting a tenant might become a reality.

3. How do you feel about other people using your stuff?

Landlords hold security deposits because damage happens. Carpets get stained, hardwood floors get scratched and there is a fair amount of general wear and tear that should be expected in and on your property. As long as the cost to repair damages doesn’t exceed the security deposit, there shouldn’t be an issue. The real question becomes, what happens when the cost of repairs required exceed the security deposit? How will you confront your tenant to address these issues?  If contemplating this (somewhat common) scenario is stressful, becoming a landlord may not be an optimal option for you.

4. Can you wait at least 15 years for your investment to pay off?

Real estate is a long-term investment for a couple of reasons. First, the transaction costs are high. Real estate sales commissions, state and local transfer taxes, appraisals and settlement costs all reduce your resale profit. Second, the length of your mortgage dictates the monthly payment. The longer your keep your mortgage, the lower the monthly payment.

 

Source: Forbes – Bobby Montagne, CEO of Walnut Street Finance

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