Tag Archives: real estate

The Cost of Selling Your Home Without a Real Estate Agent

Everybody likes to save a little money. So when Rossana was ready to sell her condo a few years ago, she figured she could save some cash by selling it herself — without using a real estate agent. After all, her property was in a hot real estate market and she thought: “How hard could this be?”

Rossana, a busy mother of one, had become overwhelmed juggling her daily responsibilities in addition to managing her rental condo. She had grown tired of being a landlord and dealing with a revolving door of tenants — so when the family currently renting it was moving out, she decided that it was time to sell.

In hopes of saving some money, Rossana chose to sell her condo herself instead of working with a real estate agent. She thought: How hard could it be? She figured it would be easy to just hire a company that charges a flat fee to photograph the condo for her and advertising the property online. After all, she could handle the rest of the details herself. Right?

What she quickly discovered was that this approach didn’t work.

Missed Opportunities

“I found the service I used was not the best,” Rossana says. First, she says the service might have turned off potential buyers with unprofessional photos, “Honestly, I could have done a better job if I had done it myself.”

Second, when it came to marketing her property, Rossana says the marketing plan wasn’t aggressive enough to expose her condo listing to a large population of potential buyers. “My condo just didn’t get the same visibility if it would have had on MLS.”

Her condo was not widely promoted, and the service she used was not authorized to advertise on Realtor.ca (also known as MLS), which is many Canadians’ first stop when starting their home search.

Low Buyer Confidence

Rossana found buyers who had real estate agents wouldn’t come to view her property since she was selling it herself. “I think they lacked confidence that the sale would go through, or that it would be a complicated process because I didn’t have an agent.”

While she wasn’t getting a great deal of interest, Rossana still had to be on-site for open houses over the weekends. “I was living at the other end of the city at the time, so the commute was terrible. It was so much work, but I wasn’t getting much traction.”

Less-than Attractive Offers

When offers did get presented, they were far below the listing price. Plus, agents came in very confident with their clients’ offers, and Rossana didn’t feel she had the experience to handle these types of negotiations.

“I felt people were trying to take advantage of me, because I was trying to sell on my own. And I didn’t have the full picture of the market. I didn’t have the background to stand up to those low offers.”

Making the Decision to Hire an Agent

After more than five weeks of trying to sell the property on her own, Rossana decided to list her home with a professional real estate agent, after getting a referral from a friend.

“I immediately saw the difference in having a real estate professional in my corner,” Rossana recalls. “She offered staging, took really nice photos, and her level of professionalism was so impressive. And when there was an offer coming in, she was able to negotiate on my behalf.”

In the end, Rossana sold her condo — about two weeks after hiring an agent — and for a price she was very happy with.

“I really underestimated the amount of time an effort needed to sell a home myself. For anyone looking to sell their home, I highly recommend working with a real estate professional.”

Reasons to Use a Real Estate Professional

Rossana’s experience is a valuable tale for those thinking of taking a DIY approach to selling a home. While there is a cost to selling with a real state agent in the form of commission, the cost to sell without one may be greater.

Here are five benefits to working with a real estate agent:

  1. Market Knowledge. Rossana’s real estate agent knew what comparable condos in her neighbourhood had sold for, and the inventory on the market at the time. This enabled her to have an informed perspective on a reasonable listing price and acceptable end selling price.
  2. Visibility and Presentation. From professional staging to high quality photos, Rossana’s real estate agent presented her home in a highly attractive manner that was appealing to potential buyers. And because she could list the property on Realtor.ca, those looking for properties online could browse the photos and features of Rossana’s condo 24/7.
  3. Administration and Coordination. One of the things that Rossana underestimated was the time commitment required to sell a home privately. Her real estate agent took care of all the showings and open houses, allowing Rossana to be completely hands off until it came time to review an offer.
  4. Professional Real Estate Networks. As an established agent, Rossana’s real estate agent could connect with others working with buyers in the neighbourhood, and present the property to those in her network, further widening the net of potential purchasers.
  5. Negotiation Skills. Rossana’s real estate agent had significant experience negotiating deals and was in a great position to get Rossana the best possible price for her condo — Rossana didn’t have to do any of the negotiating herself.

Thinking about selling your home? Let Rossana’s story be a reminder of the benefits to working with a real estate professional.

Not sure how to find one or what to look for in a real estate professional? Discover Seven Things to Look for in a Real Estate Professional for some valuable tips.

Source: RoyalBank.com – By Diane Amato February 19, 2019
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How Much You Need to Earn to Buy a Home in America Today

Seven years after the U.S. housing market bottomed in February 2012, the market has staged a dramatic recovery. U.S. housing prices are now about 11 percent higher than their 2006 peak, according to the latest S&P/Case-Shiller U.S. National Home Price Index data.

National Averages

While that surge in home prices is great for homeowners, it’s made it difficult for homebuyers, particularly younger buyers in large cities where the real estate market is hottest.

To make matters worse, rising interest rates have pushed mortgage rates higher than they’ve been in years, creating yet another obstacle for buyers. HSH.com recently compiled a list of the most- and least-affordable U.S. metro housing markets. The list incorporates median housing prices, interest, taxes and insurance payments and is ranked by the salary a homebuyer would need to afford the average home in each market.

On a national level, the salary needed to comfortably afford a home is $61,453, according to HSH.com. That estimate is based on an average mortgage rate of 4.9 percent on a median home price of $257,600. That average home price is up 3.95 percent from a year ago. The average monthly mortgage payment is around $1,433.

Least Affordable Markets

Of course, some markets are much pricier than the national average. The following are the top five most expensive housing markets:

San Jose, California

  • Median home price: $1.25 million
  • Year-over-year change: -1.5 percent
  • Monthly payment: $5,946
  • Salary required: $254,835

San Francisco, California

  • Median home price: $952,200
  • Year-over-year change: +3.5 percent
  • Monthly payment: $4,642
  • Salary required: $198,978

San Diego, California

  • Median home price: $626,000
  • Year-over-year change: +2.6 percent
  • Monthly payment: $3,071
  • Salary required: $131,640

Los Angeles, California

  • Median home price: $576,100
  • Year-over-year change: +4.1 percent
  • Monthly payment: $2,873
  • Salary required: $123,156

Boston, Massachusetts

  • Median home price: $460,300
  • Year-over-year change: +2.6 percent
  • Monthly payment: $2,491
  • Salary required: $106,789

Most Affordable Markets

If these numbers are enough to make the average American earner dizzy, there are also plenty of metro housing markets around the country that are much more affordable. The following are the five most affordable cities to buy a house, according to HSH.com:

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

  • Median home price: $141,625
  • Year-over-year change: +4.9 percent
  • Monthly payment: $878
  • Salary required: $36,659

Cleveland, Ohio

  • Median home price: $150,100
  • Year-over-year change: +6.9 percent
  • Monthly payment: $943
  • Salary required: $40,437

Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

  • Median home price: $161,000
  • Year-over-year change: +5.3 percent
  • Monthly payment: $964
  • Salary required: $41,335

Memphis, Tenessee

  • Median home price: $174,000
  • Year-over-year change: +4.3 percent
  • Monthly payment: $966
  • Salary required: $41,400

Indianapolis, Indianapolis

  • Median home price: $185,200
  • Year-over-year change: +7.4 percent
  • Monthly payment: $986
  • Salary required: $42,288

Millennials Getting Burned

In addition to paying higher prices for homes, a recent survey by Bankrate suggests that millennials are being too hasty about jumping into the market. One in three millennials under the age of 35 own a home, but 63 percent of those young homeowners admitted to having regrets about the home they purchased.

The biggest source of buyer’s remorse for millennial homeowners is underestimating the amount of hidden costs associated with owning a home. Insurance costs, property taxes and closing costs can add up to between 2 and 5 percent of the total value of the home, but many buyers don’t consider these fees when shopping for homes.

Homeowners should also set aside at least 1 percent of the value of the home each year for repairs and maintenance, according to HGTV.

In addition to paying too much, nearly 1-in-5 (18 percent) of millennial homeowners regret not buying a larger house.

 

Source: News Republic – March 11, 2019 

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4 problems with Canada’s mortgage stress tests that are hurting homebuyers and the economy

Photo: James Bombales

Economic researcher Will Dunning has a problem with the mortgage stress test the federal government imposed about a year ago.

Actually, he has four.

Last January, the Canadian government expanded its standard stress testing, which requires borrowers to qualify at a higher mortgage rate than they are signing on for. Before that, it only applied to insured mortgages. Mortgage insurance is needed if a homebuyer can’t muster a downpayment of 20 percent or more, so previously, those who could managed to sidestep stress testing.

Dunning, who describes himself online as an “iconoclastic economist” outlines what he says are four significantly harmful shortcomings of the stress testing.

1. The stress test ignores potential income growth

“The tests fail to consider the income growth that will occur by the time mortgages are renewed” — that’s Dunning’s first issue, as outlined in his latest study.

The point of the stress test is to makes sure borrowers are up to the task of making higher mortgage payments upon renewal, typically five years from signing on. So federally regulated lenders now need to make sure all borrowers can afford to pay the higher of the Bank of Canada’s qualifying rate or the contract rate plus two percentage points.

Problem is, this method ignores rising incomes. Borrowers’ ability to make interest payments in five years is based on incomes today. Dunning notes that over the past five years, incomes have grown a cumulative 11.6 percent on average.

2. It’s also bad for the economy

“They have negative consequences for the broader economy,” Dunning says, summing up his second issue.

BMO suggests that the pace of residential construction has been slowing down as a the mortgage stress test has taken a bite out of homebuying activity. In fact, Canadian home sales were down 4 percent in January on a year-over-year basis, according to the Canadian Real Estate Association, which chalked up at least some of the decline to the stress tests.

Dunning estimates that Canada will lose 90,000 to 100,000 jobs when the labour market fully adjusts to the slowdown in starts.

3. Ditto for long-term best interests of Canadians

“They prevent Canadians from pursuing their long-term best interests,” says Dunning as his third strike against the current test. After all, a mortgage is really “forced savings,” he says. Sure, in the short term a roughly 60-percent portion of mortgage payments are going towards interest, and initially renting is usually the cheaper option.

But that changes over time. “Rents increase; for home ownership, the largest element of costs (the mortgage payment) is fixed (usually for the first five years). The total monthly cost of renting will rise more quickly than the cost of owning.”

4. Housing supply problems are going to intensify

Back to that slowdown in housing construction. Job losses aren’t the only negative consequence of less home construction taking place. “Suppressed production of new housing will worsen the shortages that have developed,” Dunning warns.

Dunning says construction needs to speed up, not slow down, to meet demand. The country’s population has been increasing at a rate of 1.25 percent annually for the past three years, above the long-run average of 1.1 percent.

“Long-term, the stress tests will add to the pressures that Canadians are already experiencing in the housing market.”

Source: Livabl.com –  

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12 most affordable cities for millennial first-time homebuyers

Affordability stands in the way for millennials as one of the main barriers to homeownership.

But not all housing markets are created equal, and many cities offer this generation plenty of options within a price range they can afford.

“Millennials who dream of owning a home will have better luck if they move inland to places like St. Louis, Columbus and Pittsburgh,” Redfin chief economist Daryl Fairweather said in a press release. “These cities used to have economies that relied heavily on manufacturing, and during the recession a lot of young people moved away in search of jobs.”

With home price growth currently plateauing, the time for millennial buyers to strike could be now before that changes.

“However, now these cities have more diverse economies based on education, healthcare and technology, and there are open jobs with salaries that are high relative to cost of living. But millennials may want to move as quickly as possible because even in most inland cities the share of homes affordable to the typical millennial is shrinking as housing prices go up,” Fairweather said.

From just below the Mason-Dixon Line to the gateway to the West, here’s a look at the 12 housing markets with the highest percentage of homes affordable to millennial purchasers with median incomes.

Redfin calculated the share of homes in each housing market that were affordable during 2018 to households making the median income for millennials in that metro area, assuming a 20% down payment, an interest rate of 4.64% and a monthly mortgage payment no more than 30% of gross income.

 

12. Baltimore, Md.

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Median list price: $308,595
Median millennial salary: $85,562
Homes affordable to millennials: 81.3%

11. Raleigh, N.C.

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Median list price: $298,081
Median millennial salary: $76,729
Homes affordable to millennials: 81.4%

 

10. Oklahoma City, Okla.

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Median list price: $198,000
Median millennial salary: $60,462
Homes affordable to millennials: 82.8%

9. Indianapolis, Ind.

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Median list price: $190,000
Median millennial salary: $62,054
Homes affordable to millennials: 83.5%

 

8. Cleveland, Ohio

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Median list price: $164,900
Median millennial salary: $56,151
Homes affordable to millennials: 84%

7. Minneapolis, Minn.

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Median list price: $284,900
Median millennial salary: $83,933
Homes affordable to millennials: 85.1%

 

6. Kansas City, Mo.

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Median list price: $225,000
Median millennial salary: $71,313
Homes affordable to millennials: 85.2%

5. Hartford, Conn.

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Median list price: $249,900
Median millennial salary: $76,235
Homes affordable to millennials: 85.7%

 

4. Cincinnati, Ohio

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Median list price: $199,900
Median millennial salary: $68,511
Homes affordable to millennials: 85.9%

3. Columbus, Ohio

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Median list price: $215,500
Median millennial salary: $71,181
Homes affordable to millennials: 87.1%

 

2. Pittsburgh, Pa.

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Median list price: $179,900
Median millennial salary: $70,169
Homes affordable to millennials: 87.5%

1. St. Louis, Mo.

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Median list price: $189,900
Median millennial salary: $68,805
Homes affordable to millennials: 88.1%
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Source; National Mortgage News – Paul Centopani February 12 2019
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9 tips for buying profitable investment condos in Toronto

Photo: Jenny Henderson

Real estate is not a one-size-fits-all strategy. Pierre Carapetian, a top 1 percent agent in Toronto and an avid real estate investor himself, shares what we should know about buying an investment property in Toronto. Here are his tips to profitable purchases.

1. Understand your goals

The type of product you invest in will depend on your goals as an investor. Are you investing for equity gains or are you looking for an investment that generates cash flow?

Cash Flow

Toronto’s lucrative condo market and rising interest rates have raised carrying costs, making it more challenging to find cash-flow positive properties. There are, however, strategic ways to improve your margins, like a higher downpayment or purchasing the right product. Your Realtor will know best.

Type of property to invest in: Resale

Equity Gains

If it’s equity gains you’re after, you’ll need to think long-term. Toronto condos are a great option as prices in the core have been stable and rising substantially. An experienced Realtor can help guide you to the right product and the right neighbourhood so that you can achieve higher equity gains.

Type of property to invest in: resale or pre-construction

2. Know your budget and closing costs

Ensure you know how much cash you will need and how much mortgage you can afford to carry. This will influence the types of properties to evaluate when investing. If this is your principal residence you are allowed to purchase with as little as 5 percent down. However, as an investor purchasing a secondary property you must have at least 20 percent down.

5 Percent vs. 20 Percent Downpayment

Different products have different downpayment structures:

Type of property to invest in with < 20 percent downpayment: resale
Type of property to invest in with 20 percent + downpayment: resale or pre-construction

Closing Expenses

Beyond your downpayment, you’ll also need to account for closing expenses. These include Land Transfer Taxes and, on pre-construction condos specifically, HST (capped at $24,000).

Use this Land Transfer Tax Calculator to find out how much you’ll owe. First-time buyers are also eligible for a partial Land Transfer Tax rebate.

When investing in a pre-construction condo, you’ll need to pay HST on the registration date (approximately four years after purchase) to a maximum of $24,000. With a one year lease in place though, this amount is fully refundable as you’re able to file for a full HST rebate.

3. Understanding price per square foot averages in the neighbourhood

Paying attention to the price per square foot is a great indicator of an investment’s profit potential. Look for properties that have a low price per square foot compared to a comparable unit trading in that same neighbourhood. This will also help you determine if the best deal is pre-construction or resale.

“If the average resale condo in King West is trading for $900 per square foot and the current pre-construction deal is selling for $1,100 per square foot, you’re likely going to generate higher returns investing in resale,” says Pierre.

Photo: Jenny Henderson

4. Know how to spot a good deal

Beyond the price per square foot, there are many other factors to consider when spotting a profitable investment condo. Some of these include:

  • Does the builder have a good reputation?
  • Does the location or floorplan allow you to rent for a premium?
  • Is there future infrastructure development coming to the area?

We aren’t all real estate whisperers — if you don’t know how to spot a good deal, or maybe don’t have the time, hire an experienced Realtor to help you.

“I’m always scouring the market for profitable purchases that I can send along to my investor clients.”

5. Purchase investments where you can charge a premium in rent

There are key factors to look for as you search that will help guide you to a profitable investment property.

Rental prices favour condos along major transit/subway lines. You can also typically charge about the same rent for a two-bed, two-bath, 750-square-foot condo as you would a two-bed, two-bath 800-square-foot condo if they are in the same building. That 750-square-foot condo, however, will cost less to purchase, so you actually will improve your margins and lower your carrying costs.

6. Buy in gentrifying neighbourhoods

When it comes to equity gains, the biggest wins to be had are in pre-construction properties in up-and-coming neighbourhoods. If you can invest in areas when prices are low, you’ll reap the benefits in years to come as the area becomes more desirable.

Leslieville is a great example of how gentrification impacts property values. Condo prices there have increased 50 percent since 2014.* Investment opportunities in up-and-coming neighbourhoods where rental inventory is low will also allow you to charge a premium in rent.

PRO-TIP: Be on the look-out for investment opportunities on the Danforth along the subway line.

7. When purchasing, think long-term

When it comes to investing, it’s always wise to think long-term. The longer you hold your investment, the more equity you amass. As your investment’s market value goes up and your mortgage goes down, you’re able to leverage that equity into other investment condos. Learn about Pierre’s leveraging strategy and building a real estate portfolio.

PRO-TIP: Borrowing to invest can dramatically improve ROI.

8. Understand the tax implications

Knowing how your investment will affect your taxes — and the amount you owe — can make all the difference when purchasing property.

Capital Gains

When you sell your investment property, you are required to pay Capital Gains Tax. This means that 50 percent of your net profit will become taxable income. You are entitled to deduct expenses incurred during the investment from these gains (like interest on a loan and cash-flow losses).

HST

As we mentioned earlier, when investing in a pre-construction condo you’ll need to pay HST to a maximum of $24,000 when the building registers with the city (typically four years after your initial purchase). Your lawyer can file for a full HST rebate, refunded approximately four to six weeks later, provided you have a one year lease in place.

If you do not rent out your property for the minimum one year, you are not eligible for the HST rebate.

9. Ensure you’re playing by the rules

Ensure you play by the rules when investing. This includes understanding the rules regarding short-term rentals (eg. Airbnb) in the building to flipping condos and the financial consequences that come with it.

If you sell your investment too quickly you run the risk of being taxed as a trader rather than as an investor, which means you can be taxed on 100 percent of your profits as it’s seen as business income. It is best to get legal and property advice from your lawyer and/or accountant regarding tax implications as a flipper.

When it comes to spotting profitable investment opportunities in Toronto, just remember: it’s not about buying something, it’s about buying the right thing. Equipped with these nine investment tips, you can rest assured you’ve invested with sound advice and guidance from one of Toronto’s top real estate brokers.

You can read more on Pierre’s investment strategies here.

*Based on E01’s average condo price for 2018 compared to 2014

 

Source: Livabl.com – Feb 11, 2019

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Immigrants prefer single-detached homes less than local buyers

Immigrants prefer single-detached homes less than local buyers 

Immigrants are not as enticed by single-detached residences as their Canadian-born counterparts, fresh numbers from Statistics Canada indicated.

From 2016 to 2017, immigrants accounted for 46% of Toronto’s population total, and 41% that of Vancouver.

The cohort accounted for 43% of residential ownership in Toronto, and 37% in Vancouver. However, the proportion of single-detached homes that immigrants possessed showed a marked difference in the two red-hot markets.

Toronto has approximately half of its immigrant-owned properties as detached properties, while the figure was 60% for owners born in Canada, Yahoo! Finance Canada reported.

Meanwhile, Vancouver’s single-detached homes represented 39% of the city’s immigrant-owned properties, compared with 48% for domestic owners.

“These data show that there is ongoing opportunity to reduce taxes on earnings for typical residents, and especially younger folks and renters who are particularly harmed by the current housing market, by taxing high home values more when owned by foreigners, immigrants and locally-born residents.” UBC professor Paul Kershaw said in an interview.

“Just focusing on wealth brought by immigrants will miss an important, and large, piece of the housing unaffordability puzzle.”

 

An early January analysis by the Altus Group stated that intensified immigration will boost Toronto’s population growth, and in turn feed into greater residential sales activity.

“Markets in the Greater Golden Horseshoe, including the GTA, have the most upside potential for an increase in sales activity in 2019 given the depth of the decline in 2018 and building off of the sales recovery noted in the back half of 2018,” Altus wrote in its market outlook for this year.

Vancouver might not fare as well, however, given that higher borrowing costs and growing construction costs are expected to discourage would-be buyers, Canadian-born or otherwise.

“A key challenge that has become more apparent as of late in Vancouver has been the price sensitivity of consumers, with higher priced projects, or those priced above the competition, experiencing below average sales rates.”

Source: Mortgage Broker News – by Ephraim Vecina 31 Jan 2019

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The State of the Mortgage Market

 

Mortgage Professionals Canada released its marquis State of the Mortgage Market report last week.

While much of the media focus was on the report’s assessment of the mortgage stress test and its ramifications, the annual report was once again chock-full of enlightening statistics that help paint a picture of the current state of the mortgage market.

Author Will Dunning, Chief Economist of MPC, noted that consumer confidence is expected to dampen due to a “depressed” resale housing market and constrained house price growth.

“Housing markets across Canada were due to slow to some extent as a result of higher interest rates, but the reductions in activity that have occurred have been much larger than should have been expected, due to the mortgage stress tests, on top of prior policy changes that have constrained home buying,” he wrote.

We’ve extracted the most relevant findings below. (Data points of special interest appear in blue.)

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The Mortgage Market:

  • 6.03 million: The number of homeowners with mortgages (out of a total of 9.8 million homeowners in Canada)
  • 1.6 million: The number of Home Equity Line of Credit (HELOC) holders
  • 11%: The percentage drop in resale activity compared to 2017
    • Resale activity is down 15% from the all-time record set in 2016.

Mortgage Types and Amortization Periods

  • 68%: Percentage of mortgages in Canada that have fixed interest rates (The percentage is the same for mortgages taken out in 2018)
  • 27%: Percentage of mortgages that have variable or adjustable rates (30% for mortgages taken out in 2018)
  • 5%: Percentage that are a combination of fixed and variable, known as “hybrid” mortgages (2% for purchases in 2018)
  • 89%: Percentage of mortgages with an amortization period of 25 years or less (84% for homes purchased between 2015 and 2018)
  • 11%: Percentage with extended amortizations of more than 25 years (16% for recent purchases between 2015 and 2018)
  • 22.2 years: The average amortization period

Actions that Accelerate Repayment

  • ~33%: Percentage of mortgage holders who voluntarily take action to shorten their amortization periods (unchanged from recent years)
  • Among all mortgage holders:
    • 15% made a lump-sum payment (the average payment was $22,100)
    • 16% increased the amount of their payment (the average amount was $450 more a month)
    • 8% increased payment frequency

Mortgage Sources

  • 62%: Percentage of borrowers who took out a new mortgage during 2017 or 2018 who obtained the mortgage from a Canadian bank
  • 28%: Percentage of recent mortgages that were arranged by a mortgage broker
    • This is down substantially from 39% reported in the previous report in 2017 (and 43% in 2016; 42% in 2015). While Dunning says the latest 2018 figure could be the result of a statistical anomaly, he also surmises that broker share may in fact be down. “The lending environment has become more challenging for brokers, especially since changes to mortgage insurance regulations are making it much more difficult for small lenders to raise funds via mortgage-backed securities,” he wrote. “It also appears that some of the large banks are becoming less reliant on the broker channel.”
  • 5%: Percentage of recent borrowers who obtained their mortgage through a credit union (vs. 7% of all mortgages)

Interest Rates

  • 3.09%: The average mortgage interest rate in Canada
    • This is up from the 2.96% average recorded in 2017
  • 3.31%: The average interest rate for mortgages on homes purchased during 2018
  • 3.28%: The average rate for mortgages renewed in 2018
  • 68%: Of those who renewed in 2018, percentage who saw their interest rate rise
    • Among all borrowers who renewed in 2017, their rates dropped an average of 0.19%
  • 3.40%: The average actual rate for a 5-year fixed mortgage in 2018, about two percentage points lower than the posted rate, which averaged 5.26%

Mortgage Arrears

  • 0.24%: The current mortgage arrears rate in Canada (as of September 2018)
    • “The arrears rate… ( 1-in-424 borrowers)…is very low in historic terms,” Dunning wrote.

Equity

  • 74%: The average home equity of Canadian homeowners, as a percentage of home value
  • 4%: The percentage of mortgage-holders with less than 15% home equity.
  • 56%: The average percentage of home equity for homeowners who have a mortgage but no HELOC
  • 58%: The average equity ratio for owners with both a mortgage and a HELOC
  • 80%: The equity ratio for those without a mortgage but with a HELOC
  • 92%: Percentage of homeowners who have 25% or more equity in their homes
  • 50%: Among recent buyers who bought their home from 2015 to 2018, the percentage with 25% or more equity in their homes

Equity Takeout

  • 10% (960,000): Percentage of homeowners who took equity out of their home in the past year (up slightly from 9% in 2017)
  • $74,000: The average amount of equity taken out (up substantially from $54,500 in 2017)
  • $72 billion: The total equity takeout over the past year (up from $47 billion in 2017)
  • $38 billion was via mortgages and $34 billion was via HELOCs (the HELOC portion is up from $17 billion in 2016/17)
  • Most common uses for the funds include:
    • $23.8 billion: For investments
    • $17 billion: For home renovation and repair
      • 55% of homeowners have done some kind of renovation at some point. 27% renovated between 2015 and 2018 with an average spend of $41,000.
    • $16.4 billion: For debt consolidation and repayment
    • $8.6 billion: For purchases
    • $6.2 billion): For “other” purposes
    • Equity takeout was most common among homeowners who purchased their home during 2000 to 2004

Sources of Down payments

  • 20%: The average down payment made by first-time buyers in recent years, as a percentage of home price
  • The top sources of these down payment funds for all first-time buyers:
    • 52%: Personal savings (vs. 45% for those who purchased between 2015 and 2019)
    • 20%: Funds from parents or other family members (vs. 16% over the last four years)
    • 19%: Loan from a financial institution
    • 9%: Withdrawal from RRSP (this has been trending down over the last decade)
  • 98 weeks: The amount of working time at the average wage needed to amass a 20% down payment on an average-priced home
    • This is down from 105 weeks in 2017, but nearly double the figure from the 1990s.

Homeownership as “Forced Saving”

  • ~43%: Approximate percentage of the first mortgage payment that goes towards principal repayment (based on current rates)
    • Down from ~50% in 2017, but up from 25% 10 years ago
    • Dunning notes that rapid repayment of principal means that “once the mortgage loan is made, risk diminishes rapidly”
    • He added that “net cost” of homeownership, “which should include interest costs, but not the principal repayment,” is low in historic terms when considering incomes and relative to the cost of renting equivalent accommodations. “This goes a long way to explaining the continued strength of housing activity in Canada, despite rapid growth of house prices,” Dunning writes.

A Falling Homeownership Rate

  • 67.8%: The homeownership rate in Canada in 2016 (the latest data available)
    • Down from 69% in 2011

Consumer Sentiment

  • 90%: The percentage of homeowners who are happy with their decision to buy a home
  • 7%: Of those who regret their decision to buy, the regret pertains to the particular property purchased
  • Just 4% regret their decision to buy in general

Outlook for the Mortgage Market

  • Data on housing starts suggests housing completions in 2019 will decrease slightly compared to 2018. “The data on housing starts tells us that housing completions in 2019 will be slightly lower than in 2018, but will still be at a level that results in a significant requirement for new financing,” Dunning writes.
  • “Another factor in the past has been that low interest rates mean that consumers pay less for interest and, therefore, are able to pay off principal more rapidly,” he adds. “Recent rises in interest rates are resulting in a slight reduction in the ability to make additional repayment efforts, and this will tend to fractionally raise the growth rate for outstanding mortgage principals.”
  • 3.5%: The current year-over-year rate of mortgage credit growth (as of September 2018)
    • Vs. an average rate of 7.3% per year over the past 12 years
    • Dunning expects outstanding mortgage credit to rise to $1.60 trillion by the end of 2019, from $1.55 trillion at the end of 2018

Source: Canadian Mortgage Trends – Steve Huebl Mortgage Industry Reports

Survey details: This report was compiled based on online responses compiled in November 2018 from 2,023 Canadians, including homeowners with mortgages, homeowners without mortgages, renters and those living with family.

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