Tag Archives: rental units

Renting Versus Buying: A Real Estate Expert Breaks It Down for Us

The renting versus buying dilemma is one my friends have started to face since they’ve begun leaving Manhattan and escaping to the suburbs (I’m still not there yet, but when I think about how much money I “throw away” each year on rent, it’s actually cringe-worthy). But, maybe it’s true when they say the grass is always greener. Buying doesn’t come without its own set of problems, considering both sets of my friends who recently purchased homes faced movers damaging their patio, gas leaks, and even a broken washing machine within the first week. (They’ve confided in me that their bank accounts are still recovering.)

Since we’re no experts on the topics, we decided to tap Scott McGillivray, a real estate/renovation expert and TV host, to get his professional take. “Neither renting or buying is intrinsically right or wrong,” he says. “It basically comes down to your goals and your lifestyle.” That being said, he encourages getting into the real estate market once you feel financially prepared to do so. And what if you’re worried about going all in? McGillivray suggests trying a practice mortgage in which for one year while you’re renting, you put aside the amount you’d have to pay as a homeowner (mortgage, property tax, potential repairs). This gives you a realistic idea of how your lifestyle and budget will be affected if you buy.

“If you can manage, go for it,” the expert says. “And the bonus is that at the end you’ll have some extra cash for a down payment.” Since renting versus buying is no small debate, we asked McGillivray to break down all the pros and cons for each. Keep reading to get the full scoop.

 

 

Source: MyDomaine.com – by 

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Naborly protects landlords’ investments

As every landlord surely knows, running a credit check during the tenant selection process is paramount. However, not every landlord realizes what to do with the information the credit check reveals.

“Every independent landlord knows that to screen a tenant, you have to look at their credit, but a lot of them have no idea how credit relates to a tenant’s ability to pay rent on time,” said Jerome Werniuk, director of sales at Naborly Inc., which runs free credit and background checks. “Ninety-five percent of landlords have tenants show up with their own credit file, meaning they go to Credit Karma or Equifax, but when we hear professional tenant stories, these people come with doctored credit checks.

Doctoring a credit check is as easy as finding a template online and filling it in as one wishes. It’s what Werniuk describes as a huge problem within the industry.
While savvy landlords realize they can obtain credit checks from Equifax or TransUnion, many still don’t know, nor have time, to mine the information therein to decipher a tenant’s capacity for prompt rent payments.

“To get a credit file from either of the credit bureaus, they have to pay for it and a set-up fee for the individual’s report, but there’s a heavy credentialing process to pull somebody’s file,” said Werniuk. “Even when the landlord gets a credit file, they don’t know how to read it. They don’t know exactly what an R9 is or how someone paying a cell phone bill on time impacts their ability to pay rent. So credit is not necessarily a good tool for independent landlords.”

Naborly builds a different type of credit report using critical criteria like contemporary cost of living and verifiable income to determine a potential tenant’s ability to pay rent. It has proven so popular that, when it launched in February 2018, Naborly screened 100 people a week. Now, it screens at least that many people in a day.

“The biggest feedback we’ve received from landlords is our tool is amazing at assessing risk so that they can properly evaluate whether or not to accept the rental application,” said Werniuk. However, there remain risks that are extremely difficult to predict. Landlords have said that many of their previous evictions  were due to circumstances that changed after the tenant moved in, like job loss or some other unforeseen, and expensive, event in their lives. Nobody can predict those things.”

The average cost of eviction in Ontario is $9,000, and that could cripple an investment. In response, Naborly has rolled out Rent Guarantee, which doesn’t just risk assess but also protects the landlord for the full term of the lease. In effect, Naborly cats as the tenant’s co-signor, which shields the landlord’s investment.

“It’s based on the Naborly report and the risk score we give, which directly correlates to a tenant defaulting on rent,” said Werniuk. “We give a quote for how much rent guarantee will cost. They can have Naborly become a guarantor on the lease, meaning if the tenant ever defaults then Naborly steps in and covers the rent for up to six months. Our primary customer for Rent Guarantee is the landlord who only owns one or two units because if they don’t collect rent for two or three months, they’ll have issues paying their mortgages and they could lose the property.”

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Rental market braces for influx of tenants

 

Rising interest and strict mortgage qualification resulted in fewer Canadians seeking homeownership than rental accommodations last year, and 2019 will bring more of the same.

“It’s going to continue,” said Marcus & Millichap’s Vice President and Broker of Record Mark Paterson. “People will continue renting rather than dealing with residential mortgages. The rental market right now can barely keep up with the vacancy rate in Toronto, for example, being around 1%.”

Competition for rentals will be even fiercer this year in urban centres and that will push rents upward, creating a spillover effect into satellite markets.

“The rental market will see an increase of 8-10% because of demand,” said Paterson. “Unfortunately for people trying to find affordable housing, they’re looking elsewhere in secondary markets. They’re priced out of city centres, and that means the talent pool for jobs will end up in secondary markets.”

The Marcus & Millichap’s 2019 Multifamily Investment Forecast Report notes that apartment projects have become more financially viable, as evidenced by 60,000 units in the pipeline countrywide. However, that’s little relief given how few vacancies there are.

“The number of occupied units grew by 50,000 last year, outpacing supply growth nationally just as 37,000 new apartments came online,” read the report. “The national vacancy rate declined to 2.4%, the lowest reading since 2002. A shortage of construction workers, a long approval process and higher development and financing costs are slowing the delivery schedule this year, curbing completions by roughly 2,000 units from last year’s total.”

“Historically, Canada has been heavily reliant on condominium owners to supply the rental market, filling the void that purpose-built rentals have not been able to close. Prices have climbed substantially for condo investors, though, slowing this practice… and pushing more residents in search of housing to the apartment market.”

While secondary markets will enjoy the dregs of Toronto’s renter pool, the city will remain popular with renters. As the city has matured into a leading North American tech hub, the vacancy rate is under even more pressure.

“Microsoft, Intel, Uber and other companies have plans to increase operations in the city and bring on new workers,” continued the report. “Amid its solid reputation as a top innovator in tech and a mature ecosystem that supports the industry, the GTA will attract young professionals in greater numbers this year. Many new residents choose to rent, not only due to barriers to homeownership, but for greater mobility and to be near local employers, restaurants and nightlife.”

Source: Mortgage Broker News – by Neil Sharma 31 Jan 2019

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Why cash flow doesn’t matter

Although it may seem counterintuitive, cash flow is not the be all and end all of investing in real estate.

“Everyone has such a cash flow mindset, and don’t get me wrong, cash flow is amazing and will help support a different lifestyle eventually, but making those dollars year-over-year is where the wealth comes from,” said veteran investor Lee Strauss of Strauss Investments. “If you have an extra $1,000 in your pocket every year, the return on investment is dismal and doesn’t even add up. But if you take $26,000 year-over-year, now we’re talking.”

Strauss is, of course, alluding to tenants paying down a mortgage’s principal balance for the investor while the latter rides the property’s appreciation.

“On average for a single-family dwelling, the principal pay down is going to be about $6,000 a year,” he said. “The other reason is you have an income-producing asset that is hedged against inflation, and that income-producing asset appreciates, on average, 5%.

“If you purchase a $400,000 property and it goes up by 5% in one year, that’s $20,000 in the first year. Five percent appreciation plus mortgage pay down, which you’re not paying and will be about $6,000, is $26,000 in one year.”

Mind, appreciation is a compounding factor.

“After year three, you’re at about $460,000 on an asset you bought for $400,000, and it’s been paid for by somebody else for three years, so now it’s worth more. After three years, the pay down is $18,000. That’s why people have always invested in real estate; they just didn’t know it.”

Laura Martin, COO of Matrix Mortgage Global and director of Private Lending Hub, notes that the process by which equity is built can be expedited in a couple of ways.

“The first process is by lessening the amortization period and increasing the payments of the mortgage in order to pay it down faster. This means there would be next to no cash flow, but there will be less money going towards interest payments on the loan,” she said.

“The second way is to ‘force’ equity in the home by making improvements that will drive up the property’s value. It’s referred to as ‘forced’ because it doesn’t rely on the external factors of appreciation caused by the real estate market.”

Martin adds that the extent to which an investor ameliorates the property should be determined by how far below market value they paid for it.

Mortgages have some of the best terms available of any loan type, says Martin, and that flexibility can be leveraged to purchase more properties.

“At an average of 3.5-4% on a fixed mortgage with down payments of around 25% and with amortization periods at 25 years—coming across such favourable financing terms with other investments is highly unlikely,” she said. “There is also leverage, in terms of using the asset as collateral, to finance other properties, thus making an increase in net worth more attainable.”

Source: Canadian Real Estate Wealth – by Neil Sharma 24 Jan 2019

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The 8 Things You Need To Know To Avoid Losing Money In Real Estate

We all know those people who frequently lament their decision to invest in real estate. Constantly blaming the market, or real estate as an industry, they believe the entire process is predicated on luck and timing, an exercise in chance. For people who have lost money investing, it’s easy to sympathize with them-but are their beliefs regarding results being beyond their control actually accurate?

Many who bought property between 2001 and 2007 lost money. These were years where prices aggressively increased, largely due to loose lending practices that allowed people to buy homes they could not afford using loans that were only temporarily manageable. Prices continued to climb until these loans reset, at which point houses fell into foreclosure, prices continued to drop, and the overall housing market spiraled into chaos.

But was this truly unavoidable or impossible to predict? Is it justified to live in fear of something like this happening again?

If you believe the answer is “yes”, you’re not likely to get started investing in real estate. The constant fear of an anvil dropping on your head like a looney toons cartoon will prevent you from ever taking any serious type of action. This will also prevent you from having any serious chance of success. The consequences for incorrectly assuming real estate investing is a gamble are grave.

If you believe the answer is “no”, it begs the question-what are the factors that prevent someone from losing money in real estate? Is it just a matter of timing the market? Is it found in getting only great deals? Or are there more pieces to the puzzle?

If we can understand what causes folks to lose money in real estate, we can take preventive measures to ensure it doesn’t happen to us. While no investment is without risk, smart investors understand there are certainly precautions that can be taken to mitigate that risk. In my nearly ten years of investing in real estate I’ve found there are certain steps to take that have a big impact on avoiding the wrong deal. I’ve spent a considerable amount of time listening, interviewing, and speaking with real estate investors. I’ve found patterns in what went well, and I’ve also seen patterns in what led to things going horribly wrong.

The following is a list of the things I’ve noticed often lead to catastrophe. Avoiding these mistakes will greatly increase your odds of real estate investing success.

Negative Cash Flow

If you want to make money in real estate, you should plan on holding an asset for a long period of time. Good things happen when real estate is owned over the long haul. Loans are paid down, rents tend to increase, and the value eventually goes up. The number one problem preventing investors from winning the long game is buying a property that loses money every month.

Don’t buy real estate assuming the price will go up and you can sell it later (this is an issue I’ll cover a little later). Nobody knows what the market is going to do. This is why trying to time the market is a bad strategy to base your decisions on. Instead, only buy properties that generate more income each month than they cost to own. By avoiding “negative cash flow”, you are protected from market dips or stalling home prices. You only lose money in real estate if you sell in unfavorable conditions or lose the asset to foreclosure. Ensuring you earn positive cash flow each month will put the power for when you exit the deal back into your hands.

For more information on how to analyze a rental property, click here.

Lack Of Reserves

If lack of cash flow is the number one culprit for losing money in real estate, lack of reserves is number two. Too many variables are involved in owning rental property to be able to accurately determine when unexpected expenses will hit, and how much they’ll be. Whether it’s an HVAC unit going down, a roof leak, or a water heater busting, there will always be something you need to repair or replace.

None of this takes into consideration evictions, destroyed property, and more. While you’ll eventually end up positive if you hold a property long enough, there will be times when your bleeding cash. Having a sufficient amount of reserves during these times is crucial to your success. Conventional wisdom suggests keeping six months of expenses in reserves for each property. While this number can vary for individual people with unique financial situations, make sure you have enough set aside to comfortably weather the storm when Murphy’s law hits.

Following The Herd

As Warren Buffet stated, “Be fearful when others are greedy and greedy when others are fearful”. While many of us know this to be true, the fact remains too many people still follow the herd. Many bad decisions are made when they are based on what others are doing, rather than basing them on sound financial principles.

It may be tempting to follow the herd, but understand it is a false sense of security. Just because everyone else is buying doesn’t mean you should too. In fact, it may be the opposite. The best deals I ever bought were purchased when no one else was buying. The only reason they were for sale is because someone else lost them who originally bought them when everyone else was buying! Make decisions on fundamentals like cash flow, ROI, equity, and a solid long term plan-not on what you see everyone else doing.

Betting On Appreciation

This is the number one reason I’ve seen for those who lose properties to foreclosure. Amateurs buy a house assuming it will go up in value and they can sell it later. Professionals buy under-valued properties in solid locations that produce positive cash flow. This gives them the flexibility to exit the deal when it makes financial sense to do so. When someone bets on appreciation, doesn’t have positive cash flow, and doesn’t keep accurate reserves, they are gambling on the market continuing to rise to bail them out from a risky investment.

Buying in Bad Neighborhoods

While we all know the first rule of real estate (location, location, location), there is also still the temptation to buy a questionable property in an area that seems too good to be true. When it seems too good to be true, it usually is. While homes in undesirable locations can look great on paper (read, in a spreadsheet) the reality is they almost always look better in theory than they’ll be in practice.

When you buy in an area where good tenants won’t want to live, you’ll be forced to rent to less than desirable tenants with lower credit scores, less reliable income streams, and a worse rental histories. The cons just won’t justify the pros. Having to pay for multiple evictions, destroyed homes, and theft will cause even the most stalwart investors to lose their cool. Avoid the temptation and only buy in areas where reliable tenants want to live.

Underestimating Rehab Costs

Whether you’re a total newbie or a seasoned pro, everybody makes this mistake. Experienced investors assume their rehabs will go over budget and over schedule. They prepare for this by writing these overages into their budgets and planning for them accordingly.

There is no use in running out of money with 10% of your rehab left to go! You can’t rent out the property and can’t generate income unless 100% of the property is ready to be dwelled in. Don’t be the person who makes the mistake of buying a property then running out of money before it’s ready to be rented out. Don’t bet on contractors, don’t bet on estimates, and don’t bet on numbers in a spreadsheet. Make sure you bet on yourself and have enough money set aside to finish your rehab, even if you’re told that’s unnecessary.

Planning on Doing The Work Themselves

All too many people have assumed they would save on a deal by doing the rehab work themselves rather than paying someone else. While there are some people who can pull this off, it’s a mistake to assume you can pay too much for a property, or not have enough in reserves to pay for the work, simply because you plan on doing the work yourself.

It’s been said “The man who represents himself in a court of law has a fool for a client.” The same can be said of the person who assumes they’ll do the rehab work themselves to avoid budgeting correctly. You don’t know which direction your life will take, what time you’ll have later, or what unexpected problems will be uncovered once you start the rehab. If you’re able to do the work yourself, consider that icing on the cake-just don’t count on it.

Failing to Educate First

The final lesson I’ve learned from those who have lost money in real estate is that they didn’t understand what they were getting into until after they had committed to purchasing a property. Certain decisions like buying a property, starting a rehab, or putting money into a deal, can’t be taken back once they are made. The time to realize you’re not prepared, or it’s the wrong deal, is before you pass the point of no return.

If you want to invest in real estate, that’s great! Start by educating yourself now, before you’re committed, then use that information to help you make the best choice possible. I wrote the book “Long Distance Real Estate Investing: How to Buy, Rehab, and Manage Out of State Rental Property” to help save others money by learning from my mistakes. I document my systems, strategies, and the criteria I use to make my own decisions so others can avoid catastrophe. This is just one example of ways you can invest a very small amount of money to save yourself thousands of dollars in mistakes.

Reading articles like this show a propensity for avoiding mistakes and saving money. I encourage you to read as much as possible before jumping in. Other resources include websites like BiggerPockets.com, podcasts, and online blog sites where you can learn from the wisdom of others.

No investment is without risk, but that doesn’t mean we need to live in fear. Start by avoiding the eight mistakes I’ve outlined here and you should be well on your way to growing wealth through real estate.

Source; Forbes.com –Real Estate

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Five Financial Benefits of Owning Residential Real Estate Investments

Financial-Benefits

 

For the last 25 years, I have been helping families and individuals identify goals, establish a plan and determine a clear vision of their financial future. While a financial plan is a future road map that is normally put into writing, it is also a guideline that is used to track results, and make adjustments when needed. Since this is an ongoing process, there are several areas which should be discussed.

When it comes to investments and cashflow, many financial planners will focus on the Equity, Bond or Alternative markets, but I feel it is important to also be aware of the power of investing in cash-flowing residential real estate in areas of the country which make sense.

An important part of many people’s financial plan is the home they live in. The choice between buying a home and renting is among the biggest financial decisions that many adults make. But the costs of buying are more varied and complicated than for renting, making it hard to tell which is a better deal.

Owning a home is potentially the largest investment most people will make during their lifetime. Many purchase homes with the hope that the value will appreciate, and they will be able to build a sizable amount of equity, sell one day and live off the proceeds after investing in a 1 percent Certificate of Deposit (CD).

Homeownership Tougher in High-Priced Markets

 

While homeownership is great for some, there are segments of the population which find that renting a home and investing instead in income-producing real estate is a better financial decision.

Home-Owners

In many areas of the country, home prices are reaching unaffordable levels for many homebuyers, especially in California. According to an article in the Los Angeles Times, California’s median home price is now $537,315, reflecting a compounded annual growth rate of nearly 10 percent since 2012, according to real estate website Zillow. During the same time period, the median rent for a vacant apartments jumped an annual rate of nearly 5.5 percent to $2,428.

As a result of rapidly increasing housing costs in California, more people are leaving, according to a study conducted by Beacon Economics and Next 10, cited in the LA Times article. In 2016, 41,000 more households left the state than moved in, according to the study referenced in the article.

What this means is that people need a place to live no matter what the economy is doing. Unlike the commercial, retail and industrial real estate markets, the residential rental market (in many areas of the country) is less likely to drop as far down.

Money Out of Your Pocket

So is owning a home for your primary residence a good investment? To answer that question you need to understand that your personal property takes money out of your pocket each month. Every month you have to pay the mortgage, insurance and property taxes. Even if the house is paid off you are still spending money maintaining the house and paying your taxes and insurance. The house is still taking money out of your pocket, not producing income.

While your paid-off house might make your net worth look good, the equity is locked up in the home. If you actually need to access that money, you either need to refinance or sell the house, and then you are back to having mortgage debt or looking for a place to live.

A growing numbers of Americans — millennials, baby boomers and Gen-Xers in particular — are showing less and less interest in owning a home, according to new data from Freddie Mac.

Colorful-Houses

The study released by Freddie Mac Multifamily, found that while economic confidence is growing among renters, affordability concerns remain the dominant driver of renter behavior. The study found that 63 percent of renters view renting as more affordable than owning a home. That includes 73 percent of baby boomers. And 67 percent of renters who plan to continue renting said they would do so for financial reasons. That’s up from 59 percent two years ago, according to Freddie Mac.

Additionally, recent trends indicate that segments such as the millennials and baby boomers are electing to rent where they want to live and invest in a single family residence to create cash flow in another, more affordable market. The following are five advantages to such an approach:

1. Leverage

If you pay 10 percent to 30 percent as a down payment, a bank, lending institution or private party will provide the rest of your funding. That means you can own a $100,000 piece of property for just $10,000 to $30,000.

2. Cash flow

If purchased and managed properly, your property can offer long-term positive cash flow, and this ongoing stream of income you receive from an investment offers other benefits — see below.

3. Appreciation

If the value of your property has gone up, and you decide to sell, your profit is called appreciation. Cash flow and appreciation are two forms of revenue from rental properties. Remember, even though you aren’t buying in hopes of selling to earn a quick profit, you should always have an exit strategy in place.

4. Fewer highs and lows

A cash-flowing property is not subject to the daily ups and downs of the markets. It is typically a longer-term play — as opposed to paper assets or the Equity/Bond Markets, where you can have daily ups and downs of up to 10 percent.

5. Tax advantages

Tax credits are available for low-income housing, the rehabilitation of historical buildings, and certain other real estate investments. A tax credit is deducted directly from the tax you owe. You also get an annual deduction for depreciation, which is typically a percentage of the value of the property that you can write off as an expense against revenues. Finally, in some countries, the gains from the sale of real estate can be postponed indefinitely as long as the proceeds are reinvested in other real estate, known as a 1031 exchange.

Important factors to consider when choosing a real estate market for single family rental property investing include population and employment growth and home value appreciation. When buying single family rental properties located in a different city or state, investors also research purchase prices, taxes, and housing regulations.

Other investors also look at the percentage of the population that are renting. For instance, D.C., New York, and California have the most renters in terms of percentage of the population. Another important consideration is that you want to use the 1 percent rule, which means that the monthly rent generated is at least 1 percent of the sales price of the home. For example, if you have a house worth $250,000, you want to be able to generate around $2,500 per month in rent. This is going to eliminate a lot of areas of the country — in particular coastal California, New York and even some middle-America markets such as Denver, Colorado.

Source: ThinkRealty.com – Glenn Hamburger | 

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Rent control is doing little to curb Toronto’s soaring rents

Haider-Moranis Bulletin: In the long run, rent controls reduce the growth in available rental stock, which further accelerates the increase in rents

In April 2017, Ontario’s then-Liberal government introduced the Rental Fairness Act, which expanded rent control to all private rental units.Cole Burston/Bloomberg

Do stricter rent control laws slow the increase in residential rents? Housing advocates and left-leaning governments believe they do. However, recent data from Ontario appears to offer further proof that this is not the case.

In April 2017, Ontario’s then-Liberal government introduced the Rental Fairness Act, which expanded rent control to all private rental units. The Act restricted rent increases to 1.5 per cent in 2017 and introduced additional provisions to protect tenants from being evicted.

The Act was enacted to protect against “dramatic rent increases.” Chris Ballard, then the Minister of Housing and Poverty Reduction, claimed that the Act would ensure that Ontarians “have an affordable place to call home.”

 

The Toronto Real Estate Board’s (TREB) Rental Market Report for the second quarter of 2018 revealed that the Rental Fairness Act has had no observable impact on market-based rents, which grew at similar rates from 2017 to 2018 as they did from 2016 to 2017. In fact, three-bedroom apartments experienced a significant increase in average rents in 2018.

TREB’s data is based on its rental listing service for the Greater Toronto and surrounding areas. From April to June 2018, almost 12,000 apartments were listed while 8,497 were leased. One and two-bedroom apartments constituted the largest segments of rental units. Also, almost a thousand townhouses were listed and 665 leased for the same period.

TREB data provides more of a market-based view of the rental market than what has been reported by the CMHC. Unlike TREB, which lists market-based units (condominiums and townhouses) that are primarily owned by private investors, CMHC’s reporting of rental markets is largely for, but not restricted to, purpose-built apartment rentals.

Despite the differences in rental stock between CMHC and TREB, even CMHC’s data reveals that instead of a break, rental rates accelerated in 2017. For instance, rents for two-bedroom units increased by 3.3 and 3.2 per cent in 2015 and 2016 respectively but jumped 4.2 per cent in 2017. If proponents of stringent rent controls were hoping for a decline in rent acceleration, it didn’t happen.

The purpose-built rental universe has remained steady across most of Canada. In the Greater Toronto Area (GTA), the number of purpose-built rentals has remained around 330,000 units for more than a decade. During the same time, the number of rental condominiums in the GTA increased from under 50,000 to more than 100,000 units.

CMHC data for October 2017 reported average rents for two-bedroom units at $1,392 and $2,263 in purpose-built rental buildings and condominium apartments respectively. In comparison, TREB reported the average rent for two-bedroom condominium apartments in the fourth quarter of 2017 to be $2,627. Even for the condominium apartments, TREB reports higher rents attributed most likely to the higher quality of the underlying stock.

CMHC reported rents for purpose-built rental buildings are significantly lower because of their less than ideal location and dilapidated condition, a result of age and deferred maintenance. These buildings have remained under rent control for decades, and their owners are disincentivized to improve the quality of the rental stock. TREB data, by contrast, is based on privately owned rental condominiums whose owners, until recently, were incentivized to maintain their units in a state of good repair.

Since April 2017, condominium rentals and other dwelling types have also come under the rent control regime, thus creating the same disincentives for structural improvements of units as the ones observed for the purpose-built rentals.

The CMHC data reveals that, as expected, average rents in older buildings were lower than rents in newer buildings. Furthermore, rents on average are higher in the high-density urban core than the low-density suburbs, making suburbs significantly more affordable to rent than in or near the downtowns.

With high turnover rates where new tenants are not subjected to rent restrictions, rent controls are ineffective tools for addressing rapid rent increases. The average rent for units in purpose-built rentals and condominium apartments has risen far above the stipulated rate since the Rental Fairness Act was enacted. In the long run, rent controls reduce the growth in available rental stock, which further accelerates the increase in rents.

Rent stability is achievable primarily by increasing the supply of the rental stock. This requires changes in regulations to facilitate, instead of hindering, new residential development.

Murtaza Haider and Stephen Moranis September 5, 2018

Murtaza Haider is an associate professor at Ryerson University. Stephen Moranis is a real estate industry veteran. They can be reached at www.hmbulletin.com.

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