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Don’t-pay-til-you-die reverse mortgages are booming in Canada as seniors binge on debt

Don’t-pay-til-you-die reverse mortgages are booming in Canada as seniors binge on debt

Already carrying debt, many seniors can’t downsize because they can’t afford high rents, so turn to reverse mortgages for a new source of income

If you’re 55 or older, you can borrow as much as 55 per cent of the value of your home. Principal and compound interest don’t have to be paid back until you sell the home or die.Getty Images/iStockphoto

Reverse mortgages are surging in Canada as more older people join the country’s debt bandwagon.

If you’re 55 or older, you can borrow as much as 55 per cent of the value of your home. Principal and compound interest don’t have to be paid back until you sell the home or die. To keep the loan in good standing, homeowners only need to pay property tax and insurance, and maintain the home in good repair.

“We’ve only been in this market for 18 months, but applications are jumping,” and have tripled over the past year, Andrew Moor, chief executive officer at Equitable Group Inc., said in an interview. The company, which operates Equitable Bank, sees the reverse mortgage sector expanding by about 25 per cent a year. “Canadians are getting older and there is an opportunity there.”

Outstanding balances on reverse mortgages have more than doubled in less than four years to $3.12 billion (US$2.37 billion), excluding foreign currency amounts, according to June data from the country’s banking regulator. Although they represent less than one percentage point of the $1.2 trillion of residential mortgages issued by chartered banks, they’re growing at a much faster pace. Reverse mortgages rose 22 per cent in June from the same month a year earlier, versus 4.8 per cent for the total market.

The fact that these niche products are growing so quickly offers a glimpse into how some seniors are becoming part of Canada’s new debt reality. After a decades-long housing boom, the nation has the highest household debt load in the Group of Seven, one reason Bank of Canada Governor Stephen Poloz may be reluctant to join the global monetary-policy easing trend.

More seniors are entering retirement with debt and the cost of rent has shot up in many cities, making downsizing difficult amid hot real estate markets. Reverse mortgages offer a new source of income.

Canada’s big five banks have so far shied away from the product. Only two lenders offer them in Canada. HomeEquity Bank, whose reverse mortgage has been on the market for 30 years, dominates the space with $3.11 billion on its books. Equitable Bank, a relatively new player, has $10.1 million. Shares in parent Equitable Group have surged 75 per cent to a record this year.

Critics say reverse mortgages are a high-cost solution that should only be used as a last resort.

“When they think of their cash flow, they’re not going to get kicked out of their house, but in reality, it really has the ability to erode the asset of the borrower,” Shawn Stillman, a broker at Mortgage Outlet, said by phone from Toronto.

HIGHER RATES

Interest rates are typically much higher than those for conventional mortgages. For example, HomeEquity Bank and Equitable Bank charge 5.74 per cent for a five-year fixed mortgage. Conventional five-year fixed mortgages are currently being offered online for as low as 2.4 per cent.

Atul Chandra, chief financial officer at HomeEquity Bank, said the higher rates are justified because the lender doesn’t receive any payments over the course of the loan.

“Our time horizon for getting the cash is much longer, and generally the longer you wait for your cash to come back to you, the more you need to charge,” Chandra said in a telephone interview.

MOST DELINQUENT

Executives at HomeEquity Bank and Equitable say they are focusing on educating people about reverse mortgages to avoid mistakes that were made in the U.S. during the housing crisis — including aggressive sales tactics.

While delinquency rates on regular mortgages are still low for seniors, they were the highest among all age groups in the first quarter, at 0.36 per cent, according to data from the federal housing agency. The 65-plus demographic took over as the most delinquent group at the end of 2015. For non-mortgage debt, delinquency rates in the 65-plus category have seen the biggest increases over the past several quarters, Equifax data show.

Reverse mortgages aren’t included in typical delinquency rate measures — borrowers can’t be late on payments because there are no payments — but they can be in default if they fail to pay taxes or insurance, or let the home fall into disrepair. However default rates for reverse mortgages have remained stable, even with the strong growth in volumes, said HomeEquity’s Chandra.

According to a scenario provided by HomeEquity Bank, a borrower who took out a reverse mortgage of $150,000 at an interest rate of 5.74 per cent would owe $199,058 five years later. A home worth $750,000 when the reverse mortgage was taken out would be worth $869,456 five years later, assuming 3 per cent annual home price appreciation, meaning total equity would have grown by about $70,000.

Source: Financial Post – Bloomberg News 

Chris Fournier and Paula Sambo 

September 16, 2019

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How reverse mortgages staged a comeback

Professor Chris Mayer has a lesson for ­homeowners: Reverse mortgages, which let older Americans tap their home equity without selling or moving, aren’t as risky as some say. In an online video, he brushes aside “common misconceptions,” including fears about losing your home.

Mayer, a real estate professor at Columbia Business School, isn’t an impartial observer. He’s chief executive officer of a company that sells reverse mortgages. He’s trying to rehabilitate one of the U.S.’s most-­reviled financial products—part of a broader push that relies in part on academics with interests in the mortgage industry.

The host of Mayer’s talk was the American College of Financial Services, a school that trains financial planners and insurance agents. Until recently, it had a task force funded by reverse mortgage companies, which each contribute $40,000 a year. They include Mayer’s firm, Longbridge Financial, and Quicken Loans’ One Reverse Mortgage.

To show the need for reverse mortgages, industry websites cite a Boston College retirement research center run by Alicia Munnell, a professor and former assistant secretary of the Treasury Department in the Clinton administration. She once invested $150,000 in Mayer’s company, though she’s since sold her stake.

The six-year-old task force cites key successes. Mainstream publications have run articles quoting positive research on the loans, and financial planners are growing more comfortable recommending them. The Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, the securities industry’s self-regulatory agency, in 2014 withdrew its warning that reverse mortgages should generally be used as “a last resort.”

Mayer and Munnell said they’ve fully disclosed, in research, appearances, and interviews, their financial interest in the lender. Columbia and Boston College both said they approved the arrangements.

The professors and industry officials say these government-backed mortgages deserve a second look, partly because of a series of federal reforms in recent years designed to protect taxpayers and consumers.

“We are looking to help people responsibly incorporate home equity in their retirement planning,” Mayer said of Longbridge.

Reverse mortgages let homeowners draw down their equity in monthly installments, lines of credit or lump sums. The balance grows over time and comes due on the borrower’s death, at which point their heirs may pay off the loan when they sell the house. Borrowers must keep paying taxes, insurance, maintenance and utilities—and could face foreclosure if they don’t.

While even critics say the mortgages can make sense for some customers, they say the loans are still too expensive and can tempt seniors to spend their home equity early, before they might need it for health expenses.

Fees on a $100,000 loan, based on a $200,000 home, can total $10,000. Because the fees are typically wrapped into the mortgage, they compound at interest rates that can rise over time. Homeowners who need cash could be better off selling and moving to less expensive quarters.

“The profits are significant, the oversight is minimal, and greed could work to the disadvantage of seniors who should be protected by government programs and not targeted as prey,” said Dave Stevens, CEO of the Mortgage Bankers Association until last year and a commissioner for the Federal Housing Administration in the Obama administration.

Academics represent a new face for an industry that’s long relied on aging celebrity pitchmen. The late Fred Thompson, a U.S. senator and Law & Order actor, represented American Advisors Group, the industry’s biggest player. These days, the same company leans on actor Tom Selleck.

“Just like you, I thought reverse mortgages had to have some catch,” Selleck says in an online video. “Then I did some homework and found out it’s not any of that. It’s not another way for a bank to get your house.”

Michael Douglas, in his Golden Globe-winning performance on the Netflix series The Kominsky Method, satirizes such pitches. His financially desperate character, an acting teacher, quits filming a reverse mortgage commercial because he can’t stomach the script.

In 2016 administrative proceedings, the U.S. Consumer Financial Protection Bureau accused American Advisors, as well as two other companies, of running deceptive ads. Without admitting or denying the allegations, American Advisors agreed to add more caveats to its advertising and pay a $400,000 fine.

Company spokesman Ryan Whittington said the company has since made “significant investments” in compliance. Reverse mortgages are “highly regulated, viable financial tools,” and all customers must undergo third-party counseling before buying one, he said.

The FHA has backed more than 1 million such reverse mortgages. Homeowners pay into an insurance fund an upfront fee equal to 2 percent of a home’s value, as well as an additional half a percentage point every year.

After the last housing crash, taxpayers had to make up a $1.7 billion shortfall because of reverse mortgage losses. Over the past five years, the government has been tightening rules, such as requiring homeowners to show they can afford tax and insurance payments.

In response to public concerns, Shelley Giordino, then an executive at reverse mortgage company Security 1 Lending, co-founded the Funding Longevity Task Force in 2012. It later became affiliated with the Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania-based American College of Financial Services.

Giordino, who now works for Mutual of Omaha’s reverse mortgage division, described her role as “head cheerleader” for positive reverse mortgages research. Gregg Smith, CEO of One Reverse Mortgage, said the group is promoting “true academic research,” including work by professors with no industry ties.

In January, the American College cut its ties with the task force because the school, as a nonprofit institution, wasn’t comfortable being affiliated with an organization endorsing products, according to Vice President James N. Katsaounis. “A proper retirement portfolio is one that is well-balanced and diversified, which may or may not include reverse mortgages,” he said.

Mayer, the Columbia professor and reverse mortgage company CEO, said many older consumers could benefit from the loans because they can never owe more than their house is worth even if real estate prices plunge.

A former economist at the Federal Reserve of Boston with a Ph.D. from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Mayer joined the Columbia faculty in 2004 and currently co-­directs Columbia’s Paul Milstein Center for Real Estate. He wrote his first paper on reverse mortgages in 1994, when the FHA product was five years old.

In 2012, Mayer co-founded Longbridge, based in Mahwah, New Jersey, and in 2013 became CEO. He’s on the board of the National Reverse Mortgage Lenders Association. He said his company, which services 10,000 loans, hasn’t had a single completed foreclosure because of failure to pay property taxes or insurance.

While many colleges let professors engage in outside business activities, Gerald Epstein, a University of Massachusetts economics professor who’s studied academic conflicts of interest, said Columbia may need to scrutinize Mayer’s arrangement closely.

“They really should be careful when people have this kind of dual loyalty,” he said.

Columbia said it monitors Mayer’s employment as CEO of the mortgage company to ensure compliance with its policies. “Professor Mayer has demonstrated a commitment to openness and transparency by disclosing outside affiliations,” said Chris Cashman, a spokesman for the business school. Mayer has a “special appointment,” which reduces his salary and teaching load and also caps his hours at Longbridge, Cashman said.

Likewise, Boston College said it reviewed Professor Munnell’s investment in Mayer’s company, on whose board she served from 2012 through 2014. Munnell said another round of investors in 2016 bought out her $150,000 stake in Longbridge for an additional $4,000 in interest.

She said she now prefers another approach: States allowing seniors to defer property tax payments. The advantages include “no fee, no paperwork and no salespeople,” she said. In one way, she’s glad she exited her reverse mortgage investments.

“Anytime I had a conversation like this, I had to say at the beginning that I have $150,000 in Longbridge,” she said. “I had to do it all the time. I’m just as happy to be out, for my academic life.”

 

Source: Copyright Bloomberg News – Business News 13 Mar 2019

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What happens to your mortgage after you die?

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They say death and taxes are the only two constants in life, so the question is, what happens to your mortgage when you die?

The short answer, according to Donna Lewczuk, a mortgage agent with Dominion Lending Centres, is “If you’re single and have no insurance, the executor of the estate will sell the property and pay back the mortgage. If you are married you can continue with the mortgage if you are able to make the payments.”

That’s because the mortgage stays with the property, not the person or persons, says Mary Wahbi, a partner at Folger Rubinoff LLP who looks after estates. “Not much will happen when you die, the mortgage isn’t triggered on your death and isn’t payable then but it is still your debt.”

The debt remains even after you die. Mortgages are also considered secured loans and the lenders want their money and they will come after your estate to get it. Secured creditors have a leg up when it comes to loans and if there is security, like your home, they will get paid first.

If you’re the sole owner of the property and you have a will, the executor of the estate will have the authority over your estate. They can either sell the property and use the money to discharge the mortgage or if there is enough money to carry the costs, the mortgage can continue to be paid. If you die without a will, Wahbi says that someone will apply to the court for authority over your estate and then the same decisions will be made regarding your property.

If you bought your home with a spouse, more than likely you’re considered joint tenants (check your legal documents from when you bought your home). When one joint tenant dies, the other gets the home automatically by right of survivorship and the home doesn’t pass through the deceased’s estate. So the spouse can continue to make the payments if they can afford it and then when the mortgage comes up for renewal, they can decide if they want to keep the home and negotiate a new mortgage based on their financial standing or sell it.

Now if you bought the home with a friend, you’re not considered joint tenants. You’re considered tenants in common and the surviving person doesn’t have the right of survivorship. The share of the home, the asset, becomes part of the deceased’s estate and is distributed according to their will. Even then, as there is still a mortgage, the secured creditors are still the first ones to get paid out of the estate.

“Banks don’t care who’s paying the mortgage once they get paid,” says Wahbi.

Source: LowestRates.ca – By: Renee Sylvestre-Williams on January 8, 2019

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Big bank makes unique offer to try to entice clients to switch

Scotiabank is currently offering potential clients the chance to switch their mortgage over – and earn 24 free movie passes for their trouble.

Not the most enticing offer – it will save avid movie goers $355, based on ticket prices at downtown Toronto’s most central Cineplex.

However, the bank claims the switching process is easy and that it would even cover transfer and discharge fees.

A fee-free chance to for a client to switch their mortgage and earn free movie passes?

Not quite.

“Discharge and transfer fees – which are usually a couple hundred dollars — are separate form penalties,” Anson Martin, a broker with VericoFair Mortgage Solutions, told MortgageBrokerNews.ca. “Prepayment penalties can be in the thousands.”

Scotiabank does mention prepayment penalties on its website for the promotion. In the fine print, at least.

“Prepayment charges with your existing lender may be applicable if the mortgage has not reached the maturity date,” the bank writes.

This promotion is the latest in a long tradition of big bank ploys to entice other lenders’ clients.

Last September, CIBC ran an advertising campaign that promised clients could switch their mortgages over for free. And earn some cash.

The campaign – which was being pushed online and in print advertisement, including A-frame boards outside branches – told potential clients that, for a limited time, they could switch their mortgage to CIBC for free, and get up to 5% cash back.

A disclaimer did state that the “free” switch doesn’t include existing lender fees.

Source: MortgageBrokerNews.ca  by Justin da Rosa | 07 Jan 2016

Thinking of switching your mortgage? Sit down with and independent mortgage professional and explore all your options. Contact the Ray C. McMillan Mortgage Team or visit www.RayMcMillan.com to schedule your no obligation consultation.

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Demographics driving key mortgage market

Industry insiders are attributing strong year-over-year growth in reverse mortgage originations to several factors – the most notable being human longevity.

“With the current demographic trends and extended life expectancy we project reverse mortgage originations to grow at 25-30 per cent annually over the next few years,” said Steven Ranson, president and CEO of HomEquity Bank. “Canadians are living longer, have underfunded pensions and insufficient savings. For many, their house plays a big role in a comprehensive retirement plan.”

The increase in consumer direct business as well as continued growth through referral partners including banks and mortgage brokers is producing record results in the industry. Brokers themselves are pointing to increased demand for a product many professionals were slow to refer on.

HomEquity Bank alone reported a record $41 million in reverse mortgage origination in the month of July, marking another month of record year-over-year growth for the reverse mortgage company. 

The reverse mortgage industry is booming in Canada, growing by 21 per cent in July compared to last year.

According to recent numbers from Statistics Canada, the 55-59 age group in the country make up 7.2 per cent of the overall population, with those age 60-64 making up 6.1 per cent.

The numbers that show how the reverse mortgage sector is ready to really take off are the percentage of people in the 55-59 age bracket, which make up 7.8 per cent of the total population – which places HomEquity Bank in the catbird seat, as is the only national provider of reverse mortgages in Canada available to those aged 55 and older.

The lender originates and administers Canada’s largest portfolio of reverse mortgages under the CHIP Reverse Mortgage and Income Advantage brands, and has been the main underwriter of reverse mortgages in Canada since its predecessor, Canadian Home Income Plan, pioneered the concept in 1986.

Source: MortgageBrokerNews.ca Donald Horne | 07 Aug 2015
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