Tag Archives: tax arrears

Cash Flow vs Capital Gains: The 2 Types of Investment Income

Cash Flow vs Capital Gains by Kim Kiyosaki

Making money through cash flow versus capital gains

How do you currently make money? By going to your job every day and collecting a biweekly paycheck in exchange for your work? Most people make money this way, because it’s what they are taught to do by their parents or teachers. Also, it feels like a safe and secure path because it’s the traditional route.

Well, what if I told you that there’s another way? Another path in life that doesn’t require you to trade time for money? A path that allows you to follow your passion, achieve financial freedom, and reach your life goals? Now I’ve piqued your interest, right?

This path is precisely how the rich make their money — and it’s not from an hourly wage or salary. Instead, they make their money from their investments. In fact, the best way to make money is as an investor — but the question I’m often asked is: How do you make that money? If your monthly income as an investor does not come from a job, then where does it come from?

Making Your Money Work for You

If there’s one thing the rich do differently than the poor, it’s that they put their money to work instead of working for their money. What does that mean? Their money isn’t just sitting around in a savings account, accruing little-to-no interest, waiting for a rainy day. Their money is being invested — and delivering a return!

Different investments produce different results. The question is, what results do you want?

There are two primary outcomes an investor invests for:

Investor Income #1: Capital Gains

If you enjoy watching those “fix it up and flip it” TV shows, you’re probably already familiar with the concept of capital games — essentially, it’s the game of buying and selling for a profit.

In real estate, let’s say you buy a single-family house for $100,000. You make some repairs and improvements to the property, and you sell it for $140,000. Your profit is termed “capital gains.” Any time you sell an asset or investment and make money, your profit is capital gains. Of course, there are also capital losses (which occur when you lose money on a sale).

The same concept holds true outside of real estate. If you buy a share of stock for $20, and sell it once the stock price increases to $30, that’s also a capital gains profit.

The Problem with Capital Gains

While there is money to be made through capital gains, it’s also important to note the risks.

First, it’s a formula you have to keep repeating over and over again — you have to keep buying and selling, buying and selling, and buying and selling, or the game and the income stop.

Second, if the real estate market takes a nosedive, “flippers”— people who buy a real estate property and quickly turn around and sell it for a profit, or capital gains — can get caught with inventory they can’t sell.

Before the housing bubble burst in 2008, the mindset for many was that the market would continue to go up. So, when the market reversed and crashed, the properties were no longer worth what the flippers bought them for, and there were no buyers to flip the properties to. This led to a record-breaking number of foreclosures, and people simply walking away from homes.

Most investors today are chasing capital gains in the stock market through stock purchases, mutual funds, and 401(k)s. These investors are hoping and praying the money will be there when they get out. To me, that’s risky.

As long as market prices go up, capital-gains investors win. But when the markets turn down and prices fall — something nobody can predict — capital-gains investors lose. Do you really want that gamble?

Investor Income #2: Cash Flow

Cash flow is realized when you purchase an investment and hold on to it, and every month, quarter, or year that investment returns money to you. Cash-flow investors, unlike capital-gains investors, typically do not want to sell their investments because they want to keep collecting the regular income of cash flow. If you aren’t already familiar with my motto, cash flow is queen!

If you purchase a stock that pays a dividend, then, as long as you own that stock, it will generate money to you in the form of a dividend. That is called cash flow. To cash flow in real estate, you could purchase a single-family house and, instead of fixing it up and selling it, you rent it out. Every month you collect the rent and pay the expenses, including the mortgage. If you bought it at a good price and manage the property well, you will receive a profit, or positive cash flow.

The cash-flow investor is not as concerned as the capital-gains investor whether the markets are up one day or down the next. The cash-flow investor is looking at long-term trends and is not affected by short-term market ups and downs — what a great position to be in!

The Advantage of Cash Flow versus Capital Gains Investing

The best thing about cash flow is that it’s money flowing into your pocket on a continual basis — whether you’re working or not. You could be on the golf course, jet-setting around the world, watching Neflix in your jammies, or building a business, and your money is busy working for you. And generally, cash-flow investing is based on fundamentals that aren’t as susceptible to market swings like capital-gains investments, which means that even in bad times, money still flows into your pockets.

Additionally, cash flow is what is known as passive income, which is the lowest taxed type of income. This is not always the case with capital gains taxes, which vary depending on the type of asset you’ve invested in and how long you’ve owned that asset. In some cases, the taxes can be very high.

If you’re ready to start enjoying the lifestyle advantages of cash flow, don’t miss my recent blog on getting started with real estate.

Source – RichDad.com – Kim Kiyosaki Original publish date: September 12, 2013 (Lastupdated:April 18, 2019)
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3 reasons high household debt in Canada won’t contribute to a US-style housing crash

Photo: BasicGov/Flickr

By one measure, conditions in Canada are reminiscent of those present in the US right before a stateside housing bubble burst, yet a repeat performance to the north is unlikely.

Oxford Economics notes that the Canadian rate of debt to disposable income reached a record 167 percent last year, meaning for each dollar of disposable income households in Canada had, they owed $1.67.

In 2008 — ahead of the housing crash and financial crisis — the ratio was at 163 percent in the US.

However, there are a number of reasons that similarity isn’t likely a sign that Canadian households are stretched to the breaking point or US-style housing crash is imminent, Oxford Economics, a firm that specializes in economic forecasting and analysis, explains.

In economies with a higher share of indebted households, a few factors stand in the way of consumers defaulting on loans en masse. “In any leveraged economy, the key factors preventing defaults and rapid deleveraging include solid income growth, low interest rates, free-flowing and high-quality credit, and solid balance sheets,” writes Tony Stillo, Oxford Economics’ director of Canada Economics, in a Research Briefing.

“In that regard, there are some positive trends in Canada’s household finances,” Stillo continues, before homing in on three positive factors in a general climate of rising interest rates.

Canadian household income growth expected to continue

It’s not difficult to see why declining or stagnating incomes would be an issue for households dealing with rising debt levels.

Fortunately for Canadian households, Oxford Economics projects personal disposable income in Canada will increase by 12 percent from 2018 to 2020. “This will help households manage payment increases with higher [interest] rates,” Stillo says.

Debt quality in Canada is not a major concern

Citing Bank of Canada numbers, Stillo suggests big banks are approving fewer mortgages for borrowers with high levels of debt. Another possible positive is mortgage stress testing introduced a year ago.

The tests have now been expanded to force uninsured-mortgage applicants to approve for their loan at a higher rate than they are signing on for. This should be better prepared to handle higher borrowing costs in the future.

Mortgage arrears are still low in Canada

The share of mortgages in arrears (that’s at least three months of missed payments) in Canada sits at 0.24 percent, notes Oxford Economics. And in Ontario and BC, home to the country’s priciest markets, the rates are much lower. According to the Canadian Bankers association, 0.09 percent of Ontario-originated mortgages were arrears, while the rate was 0.14 in BC.

 

Source: – Livabl.com –  

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7 ways the tax man is watching you

tax man is watching you

CRA is scouring your social media & donning disguises

Whether it’s through a photo on social media or a casual conversation with a friend, the Canada Revenue Agency is always watching and listening. And their investigators will pursue you tirelessly if they think you’ve been lying on your tax return. Their subject of choice? These days, it’s anyone and everyone.  “We always think it’s only the rich who the tax man is interested in but it’s the little fish they like the best,” says Paul DioGuardi, a senior tax lawyer and author of The Taxman is Watching. “The Internet is becoming a favoured weapon for the CRA to find and analyze all kinds of data so they can watch people they think are cheating on their taxes.”

Here’s five ways the CRA may be watching you that you probably weren’t aware of.

1. Your social media

Any of your open social media accounts are publicly accessible and some posts could prompt a CRA investigation into your financial life. From the CRA’s point of view this is a legitimate practice on their part because posts on social media really aren’t private. How does this work? Say you just bought a new $85,000 sail boat and are boasting about it by posting a photo of it on Facebook. The CRA could see this and then check it against what you declared as income last year. “If you declared $40,000 in annual income, or a modest amount, they’re going to be suspicious and come calling,” says DioGuardi.

2. Your sales and purchases on Kijiji, Etsy and Ebay

Is your passion for vintage furniture really a hobby? Or are you running a small business from your living room and not declaring the profits on your tax return? “To compare this data would take years in the old days,” says DioGuardi. “Now the CRA can data-mine these non-traditional sources of info in a heartbeat pretty much whenever they like. They are a collection agency with police-like powers.”

3. Your small business’s sales data

Cheating on your company sales numbers by declaring lower revenue than is actually the case?  Don’t. The CRA is able to use data to plow through years’ worth of your credit card transactions with the aim of matching your stated sales with electronic data they’re able to access.

4. Bank accounts and investments

To spot undeclared, taxable interest, dividend and capital gains income, the CRA has access to info from all Canadian financial institutions. They can also determine if you’ve exceeded your TFSA and RRSP contributions and penalize you accordingly.

5. Capital gains from condo and real estate sales

“In the old days I had to go to the registry office to find out when a piece of real estate had been bought and sold,” says DioGuardi. “Not anymore. The Internet changes the game.” Now, the CRA can look at all real estate transactions and easily flag suspicious transactions. What are they looking for? Condo flippers and real estate sales where the owner hasn’t declared capital gains and paid the appropriate taxes. Multiple property ownership where the taxpayer isn’t also declaring rental income is another trigger for investigation.

6. Your income and pensions

The CRA is hunting for disparities in retirement income. It can access info on your bank account balances and income and match it with previous tax returns. If there’s a wide discrepancy, be prepared to answer more questions.

 7. Mystery shopping

Don’t be surprised if CRA agents show up at your restaurant or other small business, in disguise to eat a meal with the intention of rooting out suspicious financial behaviour. The agents could pose as a couple out for a meal to see how your business works and what the count is for people frequenting your business to ensure it is aligned with what you have reported in previous tax returns. “It’s a big job and I think they will sub-contract a lot of this out in future,” says DioGuardi.

What does all of this mean? That the shift of responsibility is really shifting to the taxpayer and not the tax collector. In the past, the tax man simply told you what you owed.  These days it’s completely up to you to declare what you should be paying, and they have the means to check that what you’re saying is absolutely accurate. “Remember, they can search anything, put liens on your property and slap you with penalties and late fees,” says DioGuardi. “My suggestion is to always give full and complete disclosure on your annual tax return. With data mining the way it is today, if you don’t, then believe me, they will find you.”

Source: MoneySense.ca – by  

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