Tag Archives: young buyers

Here’s a Look at Mississauga’s Hottest Neighbourhoods

It’s no secret that it’s expensive to live in Mississauga. Recent data released by the Toronto Real Estate Board (TREB) indicates that, as of December 2017, detached houses were running buyers approximately $910,216 (up from the high 800s in November and down from the $1 million mark they hit in winter 2017).

And while the market could cool or stabilize in 2018 due to the Ontario government’s Fair Housing Plan and the OSFI stress test (a test that some say could disqualify up to 10 per cent of prospective buyers from the market), the fact remains that Mississauga is a desirable city to call home—and therefore a costly one.

But while the city might contain housing that’s (unfortunately) too costly for many residents (hence the city’s affordable housing plan), it’s still attracting buyers.

Zolo, a tech-powered brokerage company, has some interesting stats about the Mississauga market and what neighbourhoods are the most highly sought after.

The stats point out the obvious—home prices are, generally speaking, getting higher and higher every year. According to Zolo, the asking price of homes for sale in Mississauga has increased 11.09 per cent since January last year. Also, the number of homes for sale has increased 75.28 per cent.

According to Zolo’s current data, the median asking price for a detached low-rise is $1.1 million. Other home types are also expensive, with sellers asking about $660,000 for a townhome and $429,000 for a condo

While those prices are indeed high, they’re not terribly surprising. Bordering Canada’s biggest and arguably most economically and culturally successful (sorry, Vancouver and Montreal) city, Mississauga has a lot to offer. Besides proximity to Toronto, Mississauga offers a low unemployment rate (nine per cent, according to Zolo) and a slew of ambitious development projects (the LRT and Inspiration Lakeview and Port Credit initiatives, to name a few).

As for now, the median listing price of a home (and this is all home types combined) sits at $585,000. The median selling price is only a little below asking at $570,000—so sellers are, on average, walking away with enviable profits.

In Mississauga, homes typically sell in less than a month (again, this is all home types combined).

And while homes are expensive, they’re not Toronto expensive.

“There was a time when you could buy a house in Mississauga for just under $100,000. That’s no longer the case,” Zolo writes. “Still, buyers know there are good deals in this western GTA city, with most properties selling for significantly less than surrounding areas. But to grab a piece of Mississauga’s real estate, you need to act fast.

So, which neighbourhoods are the best to invest in?

According to Zolo, the city’s top five neighbourhoods are Streetsville (#1), Applewood (#2), City Centre (#3), Port Credit (#4) and Lakeview (#5).

As for why, the neighbourhoods—beyond being well-known—are hot, Zolo’s data suggests the homes are selling quickly (25-36 per cent are selling within 10 days or less) and for more than asking price (11 to 17 per cent).

Another interesting fact is that, as of now (and this could change), Mississauga remains a city of homeowners.

According to Zolo’s data, 25 per cent of residents rent while 75 per cent own their homes. While rental rates are increasing, the data suggests that—at this stage, least—renting is still cheaper than owning. According to Zolo, renters pay an average of $1,062 a month while homeowners pay about $1,519.

So while it’s impossible to say where house prices will stand in 2018, it’s hard to dispute the fact that Mississauga is—and will remain—a popular (and likely expensive) city to call home.

All images courtesy of Zolo

Source: Insauga – by Ashley Newport on January 10, 2018

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In 2018, these homes will sell the fastest

With reduced buying power next year, expect house hunters to scoop up everything under $500,000.

Paul D’Abruzzo, an investment advisor with Rockstar Real Estate, says that while most people will qualify for less money on their mortgages, they won’t be completely shut out of the market. They will simply adjust their demands.

“If somebody was preapproved for $500,000, their new approval will be $400-450,000, so they will lose 10-20% of their preapproval amount,” he told CREW. “It won’t shut people out, it will just move them lower. If some were on the brink of getting approved, you’ll lose some there, but lower-priced properties will do very, very well.”

In Toronto, that will put single-family detached homes even further out of the reach than they are now, but the popularity of condos will keep soaring.

“In Toronto, with everybody’s sightline coming down, condos will be the most popular,” said D’Abruzzo. “In the GTA, like Mississauga or Vaughan, it will be condos and maybe townhouses.”

Single-family detached homes will become difficult, but not impossible, to afford. The Greater Toronto Area’s fringes still have moderately priced detached houses for sale, and even with the new mortgage rules, that won’t change.

“In Hamilton, Kitchener and St. Catharines, $400,000 gets you a detached home,” he said, “so you’ll see a continued trend of population spreading out into the horseshoe.”

According to D’Abruzzo, 2018 will not be kind to sellers—at least not through the first few months—but he recommends being patient.

“Right now, people are trying to get their places sold before the mortgage rules kick in,” he said. “Next year, inventory will be crap in January and February. If anyone is scared or fearful and waiting to sell their house, patience is the solution right now. Just wait and see, because nobody knows for sure what it will be like.”

Akshay Dev, a sales agent with REMAX Realty One, echoed that wait-and-see approach. While nobody will miss out because of too much time on the sidelines, Dev says Toronto’s chronic housing shortage will continue working in sellers’ favour next year.

“Whatever correction was needed is done, and in the spring we should see the market picking up and being strong,” he said. “In the Toronto area, there’s a huge shortage of housing, so it’s still going to be a seller’s market, but I don’t expect crazy bidding wars. Sellers will still get the prices they’re expecting.”

Contrary to popular belief, first-time buyers won’t have trouble purchasing starter homes, especially because cheaper abodes will be in high demand. However, they might live in those homes longer than the historical average.

“Historically, we’ve seen that when people graduate from their first buying experience, it takes anywhere from three to five years to move into the next level of housing, but it may become five to seven years with new rules,” said Dev.

Source: Canada Real Estate Magazine – by Neil Sharma 8 Dec 2017
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When you break up a year after buying a condo together

Should you let your ex buy you out of a mortgage?

Q: My son and his common-law partner bought a condo together in Vancouver last year—which has since gone up in value. The relationship did not last and she would like to buy him out as both their names are on title. Are you aware of the steps involved to legally proceed with a real estate buy out and is it a wise move from an investment point of view?

— Norma R.

A: Hi Norma. I’m sorry to hear that your son is in this position. Break-ups are hard and can be exasperated when a division of assets is necessary.

I’m assuming your fear is that if your son accepts a buyout from his ex, he may then be priced out of Vancouver’s hot property market.

To minimize the impact of future property price appreciation, he should take the money and buy his own condo or home.

Your fear—that by giving up ownership of the condo he misses out on future appreciation—neglects how difficult decisions can be with someone you choose to no longer build a future with. Just imagine it’s five years from now. Your son has met someone new and he is happy. Very happy. He wants to buy a place with his new love and asks his ex if she could buy him out of this condo. His ex, on the other hand, has just gotten out of another relationship; she is unhappy, bitter and feeling defensive. How well do you think your son’s request will be taken? Probably not all that well. Of course, things could work out totally different, but that’s just it, we don’t know. For that reason, I’m of the belief that it’s always a good idea for each part of a dissolved partnership to sever emotional, physical and financial ties. As soon as possible. Remember, it’s already hard to make unemotional decisions about what to do with an asset when hurt or regret or anger or disappoint lingers, never mind when years have passed and life has unfolded in unpredictable ways.

The dilemma, then, is how to make sure that both your son and his ex are treated fairly when splitting this asset. This should be relatively easy, as long as they agree to pay for some expertise. The first is to pay for an appraiser who specializes in divorce settlements. This appraiser will be able to provide a “fair market value” report—a snapshot of what the property is currently worth if it were sold in as-is condition on this specific day. This FMV report would give a price or price range that your son’s ex could take to the bank in order to obtain mortgage financing. She would then be responsible for paying your son half of the condo’s FMV. He can accept this money free and clear, as he doesn’t have to pay taxes since the condo was his principal residence.

As to your fear of losing out from an investment perspective, remember that he will be selling his portion of the condo to his ex and, if he chooses, buying a new condo in relatively similar markets. That puts him in a net-net position—what he gained in price appreciation on the sold condo will help with current, higher condo prices.

Finally, when it comes to the legal process please advise your son to pay a mediator or lawyer. A few hundred or even a few thousand spent on professional, unbiased advice is well worth the money spent. If he wants to focus on a quick resolution, look for a lawyer or mediator that specializes in uncontested divorces. These professionals realize that not everyone wants to battle over every cent in court and will work to find a fair, quick resolution. Also, by employing a legal professional you are assured that all the paperwork and documentation required to remove your son’s name from the property title and the mortgage documents will be complete and filed, leaving him free and clear to enjoy the rest of his life.

Source: MoneySense.ca – by   

 

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The best way to help your child buy a home – The complications and benefits of gifting funds to your son/daughter to buy a condo

Q: I am in the process of helping my daughter buy a condo, here is what we have done so far:

We signed the mortgage with her as primary and me as co-signer,  I will be giving her the down payment and she is going to be living there and she will be the one paying the mortgage and all expenses.

My question is what would be the best way to do this transaction looking it at both a legal and tax perspective. From the tax perspective: How should I arrange/declare that I am gifting her the down payment on this condo? And when do we claim the tax breaks for her as a first time buyer? Would that be at time of paying the lawyer for land transfer etc.? Also, I would like to still be able to have some room on my credit as to buy another property so we were thinking if her owning 90% of the condo and me keeping just 10% would work for this purpose. According to the lawyer, we both have to have some percentage assigned because we are both on the mortgage.

From a legal perspective, we are thinking about joint tenancy as the best way to protect the asset if one of us passes away unexpectedly.

My intention is really just to help her “fly on her own,” but with all the legal and tax implications, we’d really like to do it in the best way possible.

—Claudia

A: Hi Claudia. First, let me congratulate you and your daughter! It’s wonderful that you are in a financial position to help her with the purchase of her first property.

It appears you’ve given the current and future implications of this decision a great deal of thought.

I can only assume that your lawyer has asked for a percentage split on the property because you are co-signing the mortgage and because you are opting to have both you and your daughter on title as owners’ of the property.

This legal structure helps limit the amount of taxes you owe, as you can specify that your share in the property is nominal, say 10%. Just keep in mind that each joint tenant can gift or sell their portion of the property. That means, your daughter has the legal right to sell her 90% stake in the condo even if you don’t want or agree to the sale. It also means that you are exposing yourself to creditors, should your daughter file for bankruptcy or become a defendant in a lawsuit. Finally, the 10% that you own will not be sheltered under the principal residence exemption as this property is not your primary residence.

But there is a silver lining. The Canada Revenue Agency does not tax gifted money. That means if you opt to gift your daughter the entire down payment to purchase the condo neither you nor your daughter are required to pay tax on that gifted money. If, however, lenders find out that this gift is, in fact, a loan, this can seriously impact whether or not your daughter can qualify for a mortgage as all debts (even loans to family members) are included in debt ratios used to qualify borrowers for mortgages.

Finally, your lawyer or legal representative handling this real estate transaction will take care of the paperwork when it comes to the first-time home buyers’ tax credits and rebate. That said, ask your lawyer to confirm that your daughter won’t be exempt from these credits because you are on title. According to the CRA, a buyer is disqualified from claiming these credits if they’ve already owned a home or they lived in a home owned by their spouse or common-law partner now or in the last five years. While it seems remote that your daughter would lose eligibility to these credits, it’s still better to check now than find out the hard way.

Source: MoneySense.ca – Romona King, November 13th 2017

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Is it cheaper to buy a house than a condo in the GTA? This expert thinks so

While many first-time buyers look to condos as a relatively affordable option, one Toronto housing market expert says that it is actually less expensive to buy a low-rise home in the GTA.

According to Realosophy Brokerage co-founder John Pasalis, when you control for the size difference between low-rise and condos in the GTA, condos are more expensive per-square-foot.

In the Maple neighbourhood of Vaughan a 1,385 square-foot rowhouse costs $685,000, while a condo of a similar size in the area would likely cost $684 per-square-foot, or $947,000. It’s just one example of a price difference that can be seen across markets in the GTA.

Pasalis believes that this discrepancy in prices can be chalked up, in part, to investor demand.

“The majority of new condominium construction is driven by investor demand — not demand from families,” he writes in a recent blog post. “Investors are willing to pay much more (on a per-square-foot basis) than end users are.”

Pasalis says that investors prefer smaller units, which typically have a better return on investment, which means that developers are creating units that are too small for families, at prices they cannot afford.

“When developers are pricing a unit, they’re thinking to themselves, why would I charge this much when I can get this much?” Pasalis tells BuzzBuzzNews. “And those prices don’t make sense for a two- to three-bedroom unit, which is likely why we’re not seeing as many of those units being built [in the GTA.]”

In order for a condo to be good-value-for-money for a young GTA family, Pasalis says that low-rise prices would have to increase at a much faster rate than they currently are.

“The rate of appreciation for low-rise homes in the 905 region isn’t going to be very high in 2018,” says Pasalis. “So I don’t see this trend changing in the next year or so.”

While Pasalis admits that for families with a budget of $400,000 or less, a condo may be the only option for homeownership, he says that those with one of $700,000 or more should consider their options.

“They can choose to buy a two-bedroom 1,000 square-foot condo in Maple for that price, or a three bedroom 1,385 square-foot row house with a finished basement and backyard. For most, it’s a pretty simple choice,” he says.

Source: BuzzBuzzHome.com –  

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No listing? No problem

For Sale By Owner

Source: MoneySense.ca by  

 

 

No listing? No problem

Here’s what buyers need to know before signing on the dotted line in a private home sale

What if, while cruising around the neighbourhood on your bike, you spied a Private Sale sign on the lawn of your perfect home? What if, when you called the number, it turned out the sellers were in their 80s, had wildly overpriced their home and had been struggling to find a buyer for the past six years? Notice any red flags?

Buying a For Sale By Owner house

Stephanie Barker did, but the senior vice president at Arm Energy also recognized a big opportunity to own the house of her dreams—a four-bedroom, custom-built, one-owner with a large backyard and a converted attic office space. An Internet search, a generic sales contract and a lengthy phone call later, Barker and her boyfriend, Rob Maykut, became the proud new owners of a beautiful Canmore, Alta. family home, located just north of 8th Street. Were they mad?

For some, the idea of buying a For Sale By Owner (FSBO) home conjures up the image of a penny-pinching, emotionally charged seller flogging a defect-laden house. But if you’re in the market for a new home, choosing to avoid FSBOs may mean eliminating up to 25% of the homes currently listed for sale. Not a smart strategy. Instead, would-be FSBO buyers can learn a thing or two from Barker—and realize that, just like all real estate transactions, buyers of FSBOs simply need to do their own homework.

 

First: Know your market

Barker didn’t bat an eye when she heard how much the sellers wanted for their home. She already knew it was too high. “I’d watched the sales activity in the neighbourhood for at least six months. I knew what homes in that area were worth.” So Barker went in with an initial offer that was 50% less than what they were asking. “They didn’t even counter our offer,” recalls Barker. That didn’t stop her. “We had wiggle room, so I called the sellers.” For 45 minutes Barker discussed price, timing and conditions. “That conversation helped me appreciate where they were coming from and helped them appreciate where I was coming from,” she says. Once off the phone, Barker drafted a second and final offer. This time the sellers accepted. “I paid just a little over half of what the seller’s originally wanted and I’m sure we would never have reached a deal had we not been able to talk.”

Next: Get the right papers

Since the sellers were in their 80s, Barker took it upon herself to find a home sales contract online. “I didn’t want them to feel the added stress of trying to find a contract,” says Barker. She got lucky, says Jeff Kahane, a Calgary real estate lawyer. “At the end of the day a spit and a handshake is sufficient to close the deal, as long as nothing goes wrong,” Kahane says, But when things do go drastically wrong, it can be devastating. For instance, the bank can refuse to give you a mortgage if the home has a lien against it, if there’s a health advisory, the owners owe back taxes or the house is deemed overvalued by the appraiser. Quite often, even the seller is unaware of these potential pitfalls. “The sad fact is, it costs as little as $400 to get a sales contract from a lawyer, but you can pay $40,000 or more in fees to get out of a signed deal.”

Then: Do some digging

Getting an iron-clad contract is just the start. There are other pitfalls that can occur within a real estate transaction, explains Monika Furtado, a Calgary Re/Max real estate agent. For example, Ontario buyers can take legal possession of a property without a survey, but in Alberta a buyer must have a Real Property Report—a legal document that shows the location of visible improvements relative to property boundaries. “Neglect to ask for one and the buyer will have to pay $1,000 for the report to close the deal.”

Then there’s the measurements of a home. “Most sellers don’t realize that we have standards when recording home measurements,” says Furtado. “Like, the bottom level of a side-split shouldn’t be included in the total square footage because it’s below-grade living space.”

And what about a title search? While anyone can go to the land records office and pay for this document, not everyone understand what to look for and why it’s important. Furtado will often pull this document during the early stages of an offer. “I want to verify ownership, check setbacks and confirm there’s enough equity in the home to sell it,” explains Furtado. She’s known cases where sellers, caught with little or no equity, stay put in a sold house, refusing to vacate the home because they have no money to move.

Finally: Buy some advice

The big reason why a seller chooses FSBO is to save money on realtor commissions. “Nothing wrong with that,” says Furtado, “but because the house listing hasn’t been vetted by another realtor it often means a lot more work for me or the buyer.”

The key, says Kahane, is to get professional, knowledgeable advice. At the best of times sellers tend to inflate the value of their home, because of all they’ve put into it, while buyers struggle between emotion and logic. “You may go into Sears or Ikea 20 times before picking out a bed, but spend only 40 minutes before signing a contract to buy a home.” It’s one reason why Kahane is a strong advocate for representation—a real estate lawyer, a real estate agent and a home inspector. “These professionals have obligations and responsibilities to help and protect you.”

That’s exactly how Barker handled her last purchase: “I took my signed contract to my attorney. He looked it over and, once satisfied, we finalized the deal.” That’s how most transactions go, says Kahane.

But on those occasions when things don’t go so smoothly you have a choice: Pay a little bit of money for some good advice in advance, or pay a lot to fix a problem that could have been avoided in the first place.

For Sale By Owner

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What are the Best Mississauga Neighbourhoods to Invest in?

 

Source: Insauga.com – by Kim Kubath on October 29, 2017

With property values steadily escalating in Mississauga, it makes sense that investors (from all over) are interested in buying up valuable pieces of real estate. While the entire city is generally a good investment, each neighbourhood is different and some will suit different investor needs.

So, if you want to purchase an investment unit, which neighbourhoods are best and why?

Basically, Mississauga is a fantastic city to purchase an investment unit in. Amenities are growing, transit is abundant, and you can get more for your money compared to more expensive cities like Toronto.

Neighbourhoods close to transit (highways, GO Bus and Train,and MiWay) are great places to start and Meadowvale and Clarkson are examples of this. Investment units vary from mature detached houses to semis and towns. There are lots of amenities (such as shopping) in these areas and they are also family friendly, offering great schools and parks.

Churchill Meadows and Hurontario and East Credit (south of Derry in the Heartland area) also offer lots of amenities, parks and schools, with newer detached, semi, and town homes. These homes make good investment units as they tend to have more space for basement apartments (which are common in these neighbourhoods).

City Centre is another good area to invest in, especially if you are looking to purchase a condo. Whether it is one of the brand new buildings or an established one, City Centre offers a first time investor an opportunity to get into the market on a more modest budget (one bedroom or two bedroom units are significantly more affordable than a house). City Centre also attracts a greater variety of renters, including families, students and single professionals. Amenities and transit are also at the doorstep, making it an attractive location for a larger variety of renters.

Now, if you want to purchase a home or unit to live in, other considerations are important.

Mississauga is currently seeing record prices in all neighbourhoods. I often tell my clients that any neighbourhood in this city is worth purchasing in, but I think it is important to determine what must-haves suit you most.

If you are looking for great schools and parks, then Erin Mills, East Credit/Hurontario and Churchill Meadows are popular and family oriented. Streetsville and Lorne Park have also traditionally been great neighbourhoods to live in given their charm and consistently increasing market values.

If you want to invest in more expensive neighbourhoods, it’s good to look at Lorne Park, Mineola, Erindale (Mississauga Road), Port Credit and Streetsville. If you want to spend less, more affordable neighbourhoods include Malton, Cooksville, Sheridan, Meadowvale and Clarkson.

If you want to invest in a more affordable neighbourhood, you could be making a wise decision.

Malton, for example, offers close proximity to Toronto. As an investor looking to get into the rental market, these areas offer opportunities to purchase homes that are still more affordable than other neighbourhoods in the city. Some investors want to buy homes that need renovations and then sell them for profit, while other investors want to rent the property for several years.

Where do you invest if you want to rent your place out indefinitely?

Areas close to transit and amenities are key for having good tenant turnover. City Centre, East Credit, Cooksville, Meadowvale and Lisgar all provide these features. City Centre is walking distance to all major conveniences and at the moment, due to Sheridan College, has many interested students looking for rental units.

Investors may also want to stay tuned to developments with the incoming LRT. At the moment, there are many residents relying on transit in Cooksville and the LRT will provide another option for these commuters. It will be a benefit to property owners and potential landlords alike.

If you want to invest in Mississauga, there really are no bad neighbourhoods—you just have to choose the one that best suits your needs.

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