Tag Archives: young families

Top dollar: How high can you go?

Affordability is a major concern for today’s aspiring first-time homebuyers. In hot real estate markets like the Greater Toronto and Greater Vancouver regions, however, the desire for affordability can be challenged by the competitive fervour caused by escalating prices and bidding wars. As anyone who has researched homeownership in these markets knows, it’s easy to feel the pressure to bid higher than you’d like.

Resist the urge. It’s important to go house hunting with a firm price range in mind. If something is outside of your budget, it’s not affordable – period. A successful home purchase isn’t about beating out 20 other offers; it’s about sealing the deal on a home you can afford, with money left over each month after your mortgage is paid, to cover your other expenses, savings and a little bit of fun, too.

It’s a tall order, but there is a formula to help you find that sweet spot.

FIND YOUR RIGHT PRICE

Lenders and mortgage insurers look at two debt service ratios when qualifying you for a mortgage (and mortgage insurance, which you will need if you make a down payment of less than 20 per cent the cost of the home).

  • Gross debt service (GDS)
    The carrying costs of your home, such as mortgage payments, taxes, heating, etc., relative to your income.
  • Total debt service (TDS)
    Home carrying costs (mortgage payments, taxes, heating, etc.) plus your debt payments (credit cards, student loans, car loans, etc.), again relative to your income.

The highest allowable GDS ratio is 39 per cent, and the highest allowable TDS ratio is 44 per cent.

Want a shortcut to determining affordability? Use Genworth.ca’s “What Can I Afford?” online mortgage calculator. Input your income, current monthly debt payments and other details for an instant result that shows how much mortgage you can comfortably afford. (Note: For the interest rate, be sure to input the Bank of Canada’s conventional five-year mortgage rate, as that is what lenders use when determining GDS and TDS.)

DOWN PAYMENT STRATEGIES

Once you know how much mortgage you can manage, limit your house hunt to homes that keep you in that price range. That way, you won’t panic or find yourself in financial trouble if interest rates go up in the future.

 

You can buy “more house” for the same total mortgage if you have a larger down payment. Saving aggressively is one way to do that. Pair that with other strategies, such as the following:

  • Borrowing money from your RRSP under the government’s Home Buyers’ Plan.
  • Asking family for help via gifts or loans. (Don’t be embarrassed: 23 per cent of respondents in the 2017 Genworth Canada First-Time Homeownership Study say they’d do it!)
  • Taking on a side gig or second job.
  • Gulp! Moving back home with your parents so you can save on rent.

LOCATION, LOCATION, LOCATION

The other way to end up with a smaller mortgage is to buy a less pricey house. Fixer-uppers help, but the most dramatic payoff may come from expanding your search to a wider radius.

Consider buying in a nearby city or suburb that you can commute to work from. Or blaze new ground by moving farther afield in search of a new home and new adventures – with the spare cash to enjoy them both!

Source: HomeOwnership.ca 

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Mississauga Ranked 14th Most Unaffordable Area to Live in in North America

You knew it was expensive to live in Mississauga. With detached houses costing buyers anywhere from $800,000 to $1 million and compact condos selling for over $400,000, residents are turning to the rental market and being equally as disappointed to see that prices are no more kind there (in some cases, two-bedroom suites can cost close to $2,000 a month).

But while most people understand the GTA is a costly place to call home, some might be surprised to find out that Mississauga is one of the most expensive cities in all of North America.

According to data by real estate company Point2Homes, it’s the fourteenth most unaffordable real estate market on on the continent.

Having recently hit its lowest level in the past decades, housing affordability is definitely a highly discussed topic for Canadians today,” writes Point2Homes in a recent report. “With this in mind, our team of researchers looked at the 50 most populous cities in North America to determine the affordability ratio for each. Based on the numbers, Mississauga is the 14th most unaffordable real estate market on the continent.”

To show the affordability levels across North America, Point2Homes says it examined the home price to income ratio (also called median multiple).

Data shows that with a median multiple of 7.4, Mississauga is a “severely unaffordable market,” coming in fourteenth in the North American ranking and third in Canada—after Vancouver and Toronto.

But while the numbers aren’t great, people can still take comfort in the fact that Mississauga is more affordable than Toronto and significantly more affordable than Vancouver (which is actually number one on the list). It’s also cheaper—which shouldn’t surprise anyone—than such famous cities as San Francisco, Manhattan, NYC, Boston, San Jose and Seattle.

Surprisingly, it’s more expensive to live in than Dallas, Portland, Oregon, Chicago, Las Vegas, Houston, Montreal, Calgary, Edmonton, Ottawa and Philadelphia.

According to Point2Homes, it would take 10 fewer years to pay off a house in Mississauga than it would in Vancouver. That said, the report notes that, when looking at the raw numbers, Mississauga’s median family income stands out – it’s bigger than the income in Los Angeles and even New York.

If a Mississauga resident were to put their entire income towards their home, it would still take close to a decade—7.4 years—to pay it off.

Of course, this report isn’t the first to notice how unaffordable Mississauga has becom.

The City of Mississauga’s Planning and Development Committee recently adopted the city’s first housing strategy: Making Room for the Middle: A Housing Strategy for Mississauga.

According to the strategy, there’s a pressing and dire need to create affordable housing for middle income earners who are in danger of being priced out of the city.

Some of the draft’s findings are alarming, even though they’re not at all surprising.

According to the draft, a home is considered affordable when its inhabitants spend 30 per cent or less of their earnings on housing costs. In Mississauga, 1 in 3 households are spending more than 30 per cent of their income on housing and research suggests this number will rise.

Middle income households typically net between $50,000 and $100,000 a year and middle income earners include nurses, teachers and social workers. When people in this income bracket decide to try to purchase a home, they can typically afford to pay between $270,000 and $400,000—meaning their only options are condos and a limited selection of townhouses.

As far as rent goes, the city says the average rental unit costs $1,200 a month and that rental inventory is 1.6 per cent (which is troublingly low).

So, what has the city proposed to do?

  • Petition senior levels of government for taxation policies and credits that incent affordable housing
  • Pilot tools such as pre-zoning and a Development Permit System to develop affordable housing in appropriate locations (close to transit systems, for example)
  • Encourage the Region of Peel to develop an inclusionary zoning incentive program for private and nonprofit developers
  • Continue to engage with housing development stakeholders
  • Encourage the Region of Peel to investigate the cost of deferring development charges on the portion of affordable units provided in newly constructed multiple dwellings
  • The city has also been working to legalize accessory units (better known as basement apartments). At this juncture, basement suites remain a very viable option for people looking for affordable units, as the suites tend to cost $1,000 or less. Right now, most units remain unregistered and the city is responsible for levying fines against landlords operating unregulated units.

The city is also going to welcome a more affordable units in Mississauga’s City Centre neighbourhood.

The Daniels Corporation, the development firm who has built multiple properties in the City Centre and Erin Mills Town Centre areas in the city, is slated to construct an affordable housing project at 360 City Centre Drive.

As for how the development will work, 40 per cent of the units (70 in total) will be Rent Geared to Income suites. These units will take residents off affordable housing waitlist. The city also says that 60 per cent (or 104 units) will be set aside for renters and owned by the Region. They will be available to middle-class residents.

A second tower on the same podium will boast market-value units, creating a mixed-income property on City Centre grounds.

With the Hurontario LRT coming, there’s a chance property values along the LRT corridor will increase, potentially pushing people out of the area. The city is also tackling other major development projects, including complete redevelopment of some waterfront areas in the Port Credit and Lakeview neighbourhoods.

While the city is certainly doing its part to address affordability, it remains to be seen how the housing market will react to a bigger and more sophisticated and urbane Mississauga.

Perhaps the worst is yet to come.

Source: Insauga.com – by Ashley Newport on November 23, 2017

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The best way to help your child buy a home – The complications and benefits of gifting funds to your son/daughter to buy a condo

Q: I am in the process of helping my daughter buy a condo, here is what we have done so far:

We signed the mortgage with her as primary and me as co-signer,  I will be giving her the down payment and she is going to be living there and she will be the one paying the mortgage and all expenses.

My question is what would be the best way to do this transaction looking it at both a legal and tax perspective. From the tax perspective: How should I arrange/declare that I am gifting her the down payment on this condo? And when do we claim the tax breaks for her as a first time buyer? Would that be at time of paying the lawyer for land transfer etc.? Also, I would like to still be able to have some room on my credit as to buy another property so we were thinking if her owning 90% of the condo and me keeping just 10% would work for this purpose. According to the lawyer, we both have to have some percentage assigned because we are both on the mortgage.

From a legal perspective, we are thinking about joint tenancy as the best way to protect the asset if one of us passes away unexpectedly.

My intention is really just to help her “fly on her own,” but with all the legal and tax implications, we’d really like to do it in the best way possible.

—Claudia

A: Hi Claudia. First, let me congratulate you and your daughter! It’s wonderful that you are in a financial position to help her with the purchase of her first property.

It appears you’ve given the current and future implications of this decision a great deal of thought.

I can only assume that your lawyer has asked for a percentage split on the property because you are co-signing the mortgage and because you are opting to have both you and your daughter on title as owners’ of the property.

This legal structure helps limit the amount of taxes you owe, as you can specify that your share in the property is nominal, say 10%. Just keep in mind that each joint tenant can gift or sell their portion of the property. That means, your daughter has the legal right to sell her 90% stake in the condo even if you don’t want or agree to the sale. It also means that you are exposing yourself to creditors, should your daughter file for bankruptcy or become a defendant in a lawsuit. Finally, the 10% that you own will not be sheltered under the principal residence exemption as this property is not your primary residence.

But there is a silver lining. The Canada Revenue Agency does not tax gifted money. That means if you opt to gift your daughter the entire down payment to purchase the condo neither you nor your daughter are required to pay tax on that gifted money. If, however, lenders find out that this gift is, in fact, a loan, this can seriously impact whether or not your daughter can qualify for a mortgage as all debts (even loans to family members) are included in debt ratios used to qualify borrowers for mortgages.

Finally, your lawyer or legal representative handling this real estate transaction will take care of the paperwork when it comes to the first-time home buyers’ tax credits and rebate. That said, ask your lawyer to confirm that your daughter won’t be exempt from these credits because you are on title. According to the CRA, a buyer is disqualified from claiming these credits if they’ve already owned a home or they lived in a home owned by their spouse or common-law partner now or in the last five years. While it seems remote that your daughter would lose eligibility to these credits, it’s still better to check now than find out the hard way.

Source: MoneySense.ca – Romona King, November 13th 2017

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No listing? No problem

For Sale By Owner

Source: MoneySense.ca by  

 

 

No listing? No problem

Here’s what buyers need to know before signing on the dotted line in a private home sale

What if, while cruising around the neighbourhood on your bike, you spied a Private Sale sign on the lawn of your perfect home? What if, when you called the number, it turned out the sellers were in their 80s, had wildly overpriced their home and had been struggling to find a buyer for the past six years? Notice any red flags?

Buying a For Sale By Owner house

Stephanie Barker did, but the senior vice president at Arm Energy also recognized a big opportunity to own the house of her dreams—a four-bedroom, custom-built, one-owner with a large backyard and a converted attic office space. An Internet search, a generic sales contract and a lengthy phone call later, Barker and her boyfriend, Rob Maykut, became the proud new owners of a beautiful Canmore, Alta. family home, located just north of 8th Street. Were they mad?

For some, the idea of buying a For Sale By Owner (FSBO) home conjures up the image of a penny-pinching, emotionally charged seller flogging a defect-laden house. But if you’re in the market for a new home, choosing to avoid FSBOs may mean eliminating up to 25% of the homes currently listed for sale. Not a smart strategy. Instead, would-be FSBO buyers can learn a thing or two from Barker—and realize that, just like all real estate transactions, buyers of FSBOs simply need to do their own homework.

 

First: Know your market

Barker didn’t bat an eye when she heard how much the sellers wanted for their home. She already knew it was too high. “I’d watched the sales activity in the neighbourhood for at least six months. I knew what homes in that area were worth.” So Barker went in with an initial offer that was 50% less than what they were asking. “They didn’t even counter our offer,” recalls Barker. That didn’t stop her. “We had wiggle room, so I called the sellers.” For 45 minutes Barker discussed price, timing and conditions. “That conversation helped me appreciate where they were coming from and helped them appreciate where I was coming from,” she says. Once off the phone, Barker drafted a second and final offer. This time the sellers accepted. “I paid just a little over half of what the seller’s originally wanted and I’m sure we would never have reached a deal had we not been able to talk.”

Next: Get the right papers

Since the sellers were in their 80s, Barker took it upon herself to find a home sales contract online. “I didn’t want them to feel the added stress of trying to find a contract,” says Barker. She got lucky, says Jeff Kahane, a Calgary real estate lawyer. “At the end of the day a spit and a handshake is sufficient to close the deal, as long as nothing goes wrong,” Kahane says, But when things do go drastically wrong, it can be devastating. For instance, the bank can refuse to give you a mortgage if the home has a lien against it, if there’s a health advisory, the owners owe back taxes or the house is deemed overvalued by the appraiser. Quite often, even the seller is unaware of these potential pitfalls. “The sad fact is, it costs as little as $400 to get a sales contract from a lawyer, but you can pay $40,000 or more in fees to get out of a signed deal.”

Then: Do some digging

Getting an iron-clad contract is just the start. There are other pitfalls that can occur within a real estate transaction, explains Monika Furtado, a Calgary Re/Max real estate agent. For example, Ontario buyers can take legal possession of a property without a survey, but in Alberta a buyer must have a Real Property Report—a legal document that shows the location of visible improvements relative to property boundaries. “Neglect to ask for one and the buyer will have to pay $1,000 for the report to close the deal.”

Then there’s the measurements of a home. “Most sellers don’t realize that we have standards when recording home measurements,” says Furtado. “Like, the bottom level of a side-split shouldn’t be included in the total square footage because it’s below-grade living space.”

And what about a title search? While anyone can go to the land records office and pay for this document, not everyone understand what to look for and why it’s important. Furtado will often pull this document during the early stages of an offer. “I want to verify ownership, check setbacks and confirm there’s enough equity in the home to sell it,” explains Furtado. She’s known cases where sellers, caught with little or no equity, stay put in a sold house, refusing to vacate the home because they have no money to move.

Finally: Buy some advice

The big reason why a seller chooses FSBO is to save money on realtor commissions. “Nothing wrong with that,” says Furtado, “but because the house listing hasn’t been vetted by another realtor it often means a lot more work for me or the buyer.”

The key, says Kahane, is to get professional, knowledgeable advice. At the best of times sellers tend to inflate the value of their home, because of all they’ve put into it, while buyers struggle between emotion and logic. “You may go into Sears or Ikea 20 times before picking out a bed, but spend only 40 minutes before signing a contract to buy a home.” It’s one reason why Kahane is a strong advocate for representation—a real estate lawyer, a real estate agent and a home inspector. “These professionals have obligations and responsibilities to help and protect you.”

That’s exactly how Barker handled her last purchase: “I took my signed contract to my attorney. He looked it over and, once satisfied, we finalized the deal.” That’s how most transactions go, says Kahane.

But on those occasions when things don’t go so smoothly you have a choice: Pay a little bit of money for some good advice in advance, or pay a lot to fix a problem that could have been avoided in the first place.

For Sale By Owner

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15 home insurance myths to stop believing now

home insurance

Source: Moneyense.ca – by  

Find out what your home insurance does and doesn’t cover

Home insurance can be a tricky topic, and if you’re not reading the fine print, you could be relying on inaccurate myths to inform your coverage decisions. Luckily, InsurEye, a Canadian insurance education site has compiled a massive list of 111 insurance myths that are out there. Last month we looked at the top 10 auto insurance myths to debunk. This month we’ll look at the top 15 home insurance myths and get the facts.

1.MYTH: You must have home insurance.

FACT: Unlike auto insurance, home insurance has not been made mandatory by the government. If you own the property and have a mortgage on it, often, your bank or lender will require that you hold an active home insurance policy and name them on that policy. If you do not own the property but are renting it, your landlord may require that you have renter’s insurance.

2. MYTH: If I am away on vacation, my house is covered.

FACT: If you simply leave for vacation without taking precautions, you are not always covered. Thus, if you go away during the “usual heating season” then you usually need to either:
Shut off the home’s water supply and empty all pipes or take steps to ensure the home’s heating is maintained. If you don’t take one of these two precautions, then you may not be protected against water damage resulting from frozen pipes that burst. Check with your provider to determine what length of vacation requires you to take extra precautions, such as somebody visiting your place on a regular basis in your absence. Different policies may require different frequency of those visits, but in general it is every 3-7 days.

3. MYTH: If I have valuables, they are covered.

FACT: A standard home insurance policy covers your personal property and most valuables up to the selected limit of insurance. It’s important to note that sub-limits often apply to specialty property, like jewellery or furs. For these items, you have the option of adding coverage to your policy. Often, you will need to provide proof of value (e.g. an appraisal or a receipt).

4. MYTH: If I have a home insurance policy, I am protected against sewer backup.

FACT: Sewer backup damage occurs when the sanitary and storm sewer systems cannot handle high volumes of water, which causes water to back up into your home through toilets and drains. As is the case with freshwater flood protection, most providers offer some sort of OPTIONAL sewer backup protection, but it is not usually included on default standard insurance policies. Just a few providers include it in their standard home insurance policies.

5. MYTH: My insurance protects me against flooding.

FACT: It depends on the type of insurance policy you have. Typically, a home insurance policy protects you against sudden and accidental entry, or release of, water in your home (e.g. burst pipes).

A standard home insurance policy often would not protect you against “overland flooding” (when water flows over normally dry land and enters your home through doors and windows, such as due to a river overflowing its banks or snow melting).

Prior to 2015, flood insurance was not available in Canada at all. Instead, homeowners and renters had to rely on the disaster financial assistance programs offered by the government. Today, most home insurance providers offer some sort of freshwater flood OPTIONAL protection. A few providers, such as Square One Insurance, automatically include it in all eligible policies.

6. MYTH: My home insurance only covers the house.

FACT: Home insurance policies cover your house and its contents. They also cover any detached structures on the property, additional living expenses you may incur if the house is uninhabitable, and personal liability exposures you may face.

For condos, policies also cover unit owner improvements and some assessments made against you by the condo corporation. Make sure that you have a thorough understanding of what it covers. Our overview of condo insurance (including quoting) will explain the details of condo insurance coverage.

7. MYTH: Home insurance covers the market value of my house.

FACT: Home insurance does not cover market value, only the rebuilding or replacement value of your house. If your house burns down, the purpose of home insurance is to cover the costs required to re-build the house as it was before the loss. Rebuilding value is typically lower than market value because it does not include the value of the land. Back to the example of your house burning down, the land is still there so your insurance does not need to “replace” the land. An insurance policy can often include costs to clean up the debris, such as after a fire.

8. MYTH: Home insurance covers earthquakes.

FACT: Your home insurance covers earthquake damage only is you purchased an “earthquake rider” on your policy. These are mostly meaningful in British Columbia and Quebec. Some providers, like Square One Insurance, automatically include earthquake protection in their policy.

9. MYTH: Insurance is cheaper for older, less expensive homes.

FACT: Insurance is usually more expensive for older houses since there is a higher chance that something will go wrong, and it will cost more for the insurer to fix it. Also, many older house elements, such as plumbing, are more likely to fail than plumbing in new homes that use upgraded pipes and materials.

10. MYTH: Insurance covers damages caused by termites and other insects.

FACT: Usually not. Make sure that you know how your insurance policy treats this kind of damage.

11. MYTH: Condominium corporations provide insurance that covers my condo.

FACT: Condominium corporation insurance will cover the overall building structure, its exterior finishes, roof, windows and common areas like elevators and hallways. It does not cover the contents of your condo, its upgrades and 3rd party liability should you cause damage to other condo units (i.e. via flooding).

12. MYTH: If I am a tenant, my landlord’s insurance covers everything—it is his/her responsibility.

FACT: No. Landlord’s insurance does not cover your liability (i.e. if you flood your neighbours) and your contents (if something is stolen from your unit). A landlord may require you to have a tenant insurance policy.

13. MYTH: Damage from natural disasters or Acts of God are excluded by home insurance.

FACT: No, there is no such thing as an Act of God exclusion in home insurance policies. In fact, most policies cover damage from hailstorms, lightning, wildfires, etc. Optional coverage is available for certain types of natural disasters, like earthquakes. Other types of natural disasters, like seawater flooding or landslides, are excluded.

14. MYTH: If I get in a fight with someone and they sue me, my home insurance will defend me and cover any costs.

FACT: No, the personal liability protection included in your policy only covers accidental and unintentional injury of others or damage to the property of others. So, if you intentionally injure someone, you’re on your own.

15. MYTH: If my dog bites and injures someone, my home insurance will not protect me. I need a special insurance policy.

FACT: As long as you properly answered any questions relating to your pets in the application and investigation process, then your policy will cover costs associated with your dog biting and injuring a third party.

home insurance

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What are the Best Mississauga Neighbourhoods to Invest in?

 

Source: Insauga.com – by Kim Kubath on October 29, 2017

With property values steadily escalating in Mississauga, it makes sense that investors (from all over) are interested in buying up valuable pieces of real estate. While the entire city is generally a good investment, each neighbourhood is different and some will suit different investor needs.

So, if you want to purchase an investment unit, which neighbourhoods are best and why?

Basically, Mississauga is a fantastic city to purchase an investment unit in. Amenities are growing, transit is abundant, and you can get more for your money compared to more expensive cities like Toronto.

Neighbourhoods close to transit (highways, GO Bus and Train,and MiWay) are great places to start and Meadowvale and Clarkson are examples of this. Investment units vary from mature detached houses to semis and towns. There are lots of amenities (such as shopping) in these areas and they are also family friendly, offering great schools and parks.

Churchill Meadows and Hurontario and East Credit (south of Derry in the Heartland area) also offer lots of amenities, parks and schools, with newer detached, semi, and town homes. These homes make good investment units as they tend to have more space for basement apartments (which are common in these neighbourhoods).

City Centre is another good area to invest in, especially if you are looking to purchase a condo. Whether it is one of the brand new buildings or an established one, City Centre offers a first time investor an opportunity to get into the market on a more modest budget (one bedroom or two bedroom units are significantly more affordable than a house). City Centre also attracts a greater variety of renters, including families, students and single professionals. Amenities and transit are also at the doorstep, making it an attractive location for a larger variety of renters.

Now, if you want to purchase a home or unit to live in, other considerations are important.

Mississauga is currently seeing record prices in all neighbourhoods. I often tell my clients that any neighbourhood in this city is worth purchasing in, but I think it is important to determine what must-haves suit you most.

If you are looking for great schools and parks, then Erin Mills, East Credit/Hurontario and Churchill Meadows are popular and family oriented. Streetsville and Lorne Park have also traditionally been great neighbourhoods to live in given their charm and consistently increasing market values.

If you want to invest in more expensive neighbourhoods, it’s good to look at Lorne Park, Mineola, Erindale (Mississauga Road), Port Credit and Streetsville. If you want to spend less, more affordable neighbourhoods include Malton, Cooksville, Sheridan, Meadowvale and Clarkson.

If you want to invest in a more affordable neighbourhood, you could be making a wise decision.

Malton, for example, offers close proximity to Toronto. As an investor looking to get into the rental market, these areas offer opportunities to purchase homes that are still more affordable than other neighbourhoods in the city. Some investors want to buy homes that need renovations and then sell them for profit, while other investors want to rent the property for several years.

Where do you invest if you want to rent your place out indefinitely?

Areas close to transit and amenities are key for having good tenant turnover. City Centre, East Credit, Cooksville, Meadowvale and Lisgar all provide these features. City Centre is walking distance to all major conveniences and at the moment, due to Sheridan College, has many interested students looking for rental units.

Investors may also want to stay tuned to developments with the incoming LRT. At the moment, there are many residents relying on transit in Cooksville and the LRT will provide another option for these commuters. It will be a benefit to property owners and potential landlords alike.

If you want to invest in Mississauga, there really are no bad neighbourhoods—you just have to choose the one that best suits your needs.

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Growing Trend: Buying Real Estate with Family and Friends

 

Source: Canadian Mortgage Trends – Alan Harder 

While it’s fairly common for those in tight rental markets to have a roommate to help split the rent, an emerging trend is buying real estate with a family member or friend.

Faced with high home prices in big cities and tougher mortgage rules, including a new stress test on uninsured mortgages, it’s becoming increasingly difficult for first-time homebuyers to get their foot in the door of the real estate market. As such, prospective buyers are finding more creative ways to be able to enter the real estate market, and buying with a family member or friend is one of them.

When considering co-ownership, it doesn’t have to be with a spouse or romantic partner. It can be your brother, sister, aunt, uncle, cousin, friend or even co-worker. When you’re buying with a partner, make sure it’s someone you can trust. You’ll both be on the title and responsible for paying the mortgage on time and in full. If either you or your partner run into financial difficulties and are unable to pay your respective share of the mortgage, it could adversely affect your credit score if the other party is unable to come up with the extra money.

For that reason, I recommend treating co-ownership like a business arrangement by having a lawyer draft up an agreement. Also, this living arrangement likely isn’t permanent. You’ll want this agreement in place when you or your partner wants to sell. The last thing you’d want is for the sale of your property to hurt your relationship.

Qualifying for a Mortgage is Easier with a Partner

Buying with a partner helps you in several ways. The first is mortgage qualification. Two of the factors that lenders consider when qualifying you for a mortgage is your down payment and income.

Saving a sizable down payment is tough, especially for those living in cities like Toronto or Vancouver with sky-high rents and home prices.

Not to mention it’s also more challenging to qualify for a mortgage on a single income. Even being able to afford to a starter home, such as a condo in Vancouver, on a single income can be tough. That’s where buying with a partner comes in handy.

When buying with a partner, both of your down payments and incomes are taken into account. This makes qualifying for a mortgage a lot easier. In many cases it means qualifying for a home you otherwise wouldn’t be able to afford on your own.

For example, instead of only being able to afford a cramped condo, you might be able to afford a more spacious townhouse or semi-detached house. In essence, buying with a partner helps you move up the property ladder faster.

If you don’t know anyone who’s in the financial position to purchase a property with you, you’re not necessarily out of luck. The sharing economy is throwing homebuyers a lifeline. There are real estate matchmaking services like C-Harmony that will pair you with fellow homebuyers.

Some lenders like Meridian Credit Union are making buying with family and friends easier than ever by offering mortgages specifically for this living arrangement. With the Family and Friends Mortgage, up to four people can obtain a mortgage at a low rate.

Ready to Buy with a Partner?

The first step is to find a reliable partner who would be willing to purchase a property with you. After that, you’ll want to get pre-approved for a mortgage. With your housing budget in mind, you can buy a property together that will be a good long-term investment for both of you.

Once you purchase a property, don’t forget to have an agreement drafted up by a lawyer so there aren’t any surprises when one partner eventually wants out of the deal.

This will make for a happy, and hopefully long-term, real estate partnership.

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