Tag Archives: young families

Condo Investors: How a retail director turned a $75,000 wedding gift into a $1.4-million portfolio

Her first investment was a $289,000 pre-construction condo in CityPlace
The buyer

Sandy Silva, a 39-year-old sales director at Tulip Retail, a software platform for retail companies, with her seven-year-old son, Xavier.

The backstory

In 1999, Sandy started dating her soon-to-be husband, Ryan, in Waterloo. She studied economics at Wilfrid Laurier University while he took political science at the University of Waterloo. In 2002, they got engaged, and Sandy’s father gave them an early wedding gift of $75,000. Sandy and Ryan used that money for a down payment on a $289,000 pre-construction two-bedroom condo in CityPlace. In 2005, they got married and moved into the unit.

Within a few years, they were thinking about having children, and being near family became a priority. At the time, they both worked in Toronto: she was a buyer for Sporting Life and he was a supervisor at an automotive manufacturing company. They used their combined savings, along with equity from refinancing their condo, to buy a $470,000 detached house in Brampton, where Sandy’s parents lived. Meanwhile, to make some extra cash, they rented out their CityPlace condo for $2,150 a month.

The value of their properties increased enough, after four years, that they decided to leverage their equity to scoop up more real estate. They knew, from having lived in the Waterloo Region during their college years, that demand exceeded supply in the area. Ryan also had family in Waterloo, which meant someone could take care of their investment properties. So they bought two detached houses in Waterloo for a combined $462,000 and rented them to university students for a total of $4,675 a month. The rental income was enough to pay their mortgage and turn a profit. In 2013, Xavier was born.

Three years later, Sandy and Ryan separated. Ryan sold the two Waterloo homes for a total of $540,000 and split the $78,000 profit with Sandy. He also kept the place in Brampton. Sandy held on to the CityPlace condo and took $250,000 in equity from the Brampton property, which she used to invest in Rent Frock Repeat, a designer dress rental company.

The bottom line

Sandy recently joined Tulip Retail as a sales director. She lives part time at her CityPlace condo, which is now worth $850,000, otherwise she stays at her parents’ place in Brampton with Xavier. And Sandy’s not done investing. She recently bought a one-bedroom condo in Vaughan—which she plans to use as a rental property—for $525,000. Her portfolio is now worth $1.375 million. Before the end of 2020, Sandy would like to buy a place in Brampton.

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Mortgage qualification a barrier to homeownership — poll

A growing number of Canadians see mortgage qualification as the biggest barrier to homeownership, according to a recent study by Zillow and Ipsos.

Around 56% of Canadians see qualifying for a mortgage as a barrier to homeownership, a six-point increase from 2018. After mortgage qualification, the next top worry for buyers is whether they can afford the mortgage payment, with roughly 54% saying so.

Canadian borrowers have to qualify under the stricter mortgage requirements and stress test that took effect in January 2018. Under the new rules, borrowers should be able to prove that they can service a mortgage at a higher rate.

“The rule only applies to newly originated mortgages and is designed to prevent borrowers from taking on more debt than they can handle if interest rates go up,” the study said.

One in two Canadians said they are concerned that these new rules will prevent them from qualifying from a mortgage.

Younger borrowers bear the weight of the new rules the most, with 69% of those in the 18-34 age bracket feeling concerned about qualifying for a mortgage.

“These mortgage regulations could impact a substantial portion of potential buyers, as the survey results show a large share of Canadian homeowners get mortgages. This worry is also present for current renters who may be considering the purchase of their first home,” the study said.

A recent report by the Canadian Mortgage and Housing Corporation, however, indicated that most buyers felt there were benefits to the stress test. The CMHC survey found that 65% of buyers believe the mortgage qualification stress test will prevent more Canadians from taking on a mortgage they can’t afford in the future.

While the majority of homebuyers surveyed by CMHC were aware of the new rules, more than three-quarters said the changes had little or no impact on their decision to buy a home. This number is down slightly from 80% in 2018, but still represents a healthy majority of homebuyers.

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These homes just sold for under $500,000 in Mississauga

If you’re hoping to purchase a home—especially as a first-time homebuyer—in 2020, you will face a challenging market defined by low inventory and high prices (which appear to be climbing higher).

But you’ll also enjoy low interest rates and, if you qualify, help from the federal government’s First-Time Home Buyer Incentive.

Penelope Graham, the managing editor of real estate brokerage and website Zoocasa, says that the current dearth in housing supply (just 335 homes hit the market in December 2019) has driven the average home price up to $799,593 in Mississauga.

While the supply and demand imbalance is tough, there are homes available for under $500,000 in the city.

Here’s a look at some affordable homes that hit the market in late 2019.

All info and images courtesy of Zoocasa


906 – 3145 Queen Frederica Drive

This one-bedroom, one-bathroom, 500+ square foot unit just sold for $285,000 after being listed for $275,000. The suite, which is good for investors or first-time buyers who don’t mind giving the place a little TLC, offers a large balcony and proximity to shopping and transit.


113 – 5100 Winston Churchill Boulevard

This approximately 499 square foot bachelor suite offers one bathroom and no parking space, but it’s a pretty rare find in the city. The unit just sold for $325,000 after being listed for $354,900, and it offers ensuite laundry, a back door exit to the patio, low condo fees and a pretty prime location.


13 – 605 Shoreline Drive

This 599 square foot condo boasts one bedroom, one bathroom and one parking spot. It sold for $364,000 after being listed for $361,000, and it features an open-concept living, dining and kitchen combo and additional cabinets in the kitchen.


407 – 2900 Battleford Road

This two-bedroom, one-bathroom unit boasts up to 799 square feet of space and two parking spaces (which is rare). The unit sold for $373,000 after being listed for $375,000, and the building features a gym, party room, tennis court, sauna, outdoor pool, children’s playground and visitor parking.


27 – 4620 Guildwood Way

This one-bedroom, one-bathroom unit spans about 599 square feet and offers one parking spot. It sold for $380,000 after being listed for $395,000. It offers laminate flooring, ensuite laundry, a modern kitchen and double sinks.

 

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Ontario’s rental vacancy rate is starting 2020 at a near record low

Mississauga Toronto condo prices<img class=”aligncenter size-full wp-image-196480″ src=”https://d3exkutavo4sli.cloudfront.net/wp-content/uploads/2019/10/Mississauga-Toronto-condo-prices.jpg” alt=”Mississauga Toronto condo prices” width=”1024″ height=”683″ />

Photo: James Bombales

New year, no vacancy. Renters in cities across Ontario will spend another year struggling to find rental housing as prices continue to rise in the face of tight market conditions.

In 2019, the vacancy rate was 1.6 percent and it will likely drop further through 2020 to a near record low of 1.5 percent, according to Central 1 Credit Union economist Edgard Navarrete. For context, the vacancy rate for Ontario’s rental market averaged 2.6 percent between 1991 and 2018.

In his 2019-2022 housing forecast published at the end of 2019, Navarrete noted that the province has seen a substantial uptick in completed new rental units over the last three years. Through the same 1991 to 2018 period, the average number of new rental units added to the market was 1,500. From 2017 to 2019, the average increased to 7,000 units.

The trouble is that increase still doesn’t satisfy the demand for rentals in some of the province’s most competitive markets, especially Toronto, which is said to have the worst rental supply deficit in Canada.

“Government investments in rental housing will continue to add to the rental universe but expect [the province’s] rental vacancy rate to remain stubbornly lower than the long-term average due to continued strong demand from immigrants settling in Ontario and existing renters opting to remain in rental longer until they have a sufficient down payment to qualify for a mortgage loan,” wrote Navarrete in the Central 1 Housing Forecast.

Unfortunately, the main takeaway here for Ontario renters is monthly rents will continue to climb above inflation as long as this sharp disparity exists between rental supply and persistent demand. Navarrete singles out Toronto, Ottawa-Gatineau, London, Kitchener-Cambridge-Waterloo and Hamilton as markets where rental prices will log especially steep increases and bidding wars will keep intensifying. These cities will feel the strain on their rental markets particularly acutely because they are set to absorb the most new residents to the province.

There is hope for a rental unit supply uptick in the next few years, but for those looking for a new rental this year, it’s unlikely to offer much relief. The provincial government under Premier Doug Ford rolled back the rent control measures introduced by the Wynne Liberal government just a couple years earlier. With more flexibility to price rental units in response to market demand, investors are more likely to see condos as a solid long-term moneymaker and purchase units to add to the rental market.

These investor-owned condos are known as the “secondary rental market” since they are not built for the sole purpose of being added to the rental pool. Purpose-built rental units are known as the primary rental market.

The caveat is that the positive market changes this policy shift from the Ford government intended to inspire won’t be felt for at least a few years.

“If we see a large number of investors entering the market today, with the average completion time of high-density housing such as condo apartments anywhere from two to three years from the time shovels hit the ground, it wouldn’t be until after 2022 when the increased rental market supply will alleviate some of the pressures from the primary rental market,” wrote Navarrete.

Source: Livabl.com –

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Canadian buyers increasingly worried about qualifying for mortgage

Canadian buyers increasingly worried about qualifying for mortgage 

Ninety-two percent of Canadians see at least one barrier to home ownership, and two of the top concerns are related to the mortgage process, according to a recent survey from Zillow and Ipsos.

Canadians report feeling pressured by stricter mortgage regulations that went into effect in 2018 and Zillow’s survey found that 56% of Canadians see qualifying for a mortgage as a barrier to home ownership—a six-point increase from 2018. This concern rises to 64% for consumers who recently purchased a home, likely linked to the impending mortgage regulation changes at the time of their home search.

New and stricter mortgage requirements took effect in January 2018 with the addition of a stress test, requiring borrowers to qualify under a higher rate. The rule only applies to newly originated mortgages and is designed to prevent borrowers from taking on more debt than they can handle if interest rates go up. Since its passing, buyers’ worries are growing according to the survey. Half of Canadians (51%) say they are specifically concerned that stricter rules will prevent them from qualifying for a mortgage, up five points since 2018.

Steve Garganis, lead mortgage planner with Mortgage Architects in Mississauga, said that the concerns have risen due to more information flowing to consumers.

“Canadians are surprised to learn that even a large down payment won’t guarantee you a mortgage approval. Got 30%, 40%, 50%, 60% down payment and great credit? Guess what?  You still may not qualify for a mortgage. This is ridiculous, in my opinion,” Garganis said. “Those of us with years of experience in risk mitigation and credit adjudication know that if you have a large down payment, the chances of default are slim and none. Chances of any loss to the lender is nil.”

Younger home shoppers also feel the weight of the law. Sixty-nine percent of younger home shoppers, those between 18-34 years old, are concerned about qualifying for a mortgage under the stricter guidelines. This worry is also present for current renters who may be considering the purchase of their first home: 66% express concerns about mortgage qualification under stricter guidelines.

This despite a recent CMHC survey that found homebuyers were overwhelmingly in favour of the stress test, agreeing that the measure would help prevent Canadians from shouldering mortgages that they couldn’t afford.

Garganis added that more Canadians are being forced back to the six big banks, as smaller lenders now have more costs in raising funds to lend. This results in Canadians paying more than they should.

Most people have heard the buzz word “stress test” but don’t really know what it means or know the specifics of what it did, said Jeff Evans, mortgage broker with Canada Innovative Financial in Richmond, B.C. He thinks that the higher qualifying standard is “quite unreasonable,” and that the government has “taken a hatchet to anything to do with helping the average Canadian to own a home.”

Evans says that Canadians have a right to be concerned, although there’s no sign of their concerns hampering their desire to purchase a home.

“Life has gone on. They qualify for less, the market has gone down primarily because of the changes the government has made, so it’s starting to get more affordable again and people are gradually coming into the market as it becomes more affordable, “Evans said.

Other perceived barriers to home ownership include coming up with a down payment (66%), debt (56%), lack of job security (47%), property taxes (46%), not being in a position to settle down (15%), or not being enough homes for sale (13%). Only 8% of Canadians claim not to see any barriers to owning a home.

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Young Homebuyers Are Vanishing From the U.S.

The median age of first-time home buyers has increased to 33, the oldest in records dating back to 1981, according to a National Association of Realtors report released Friday. The median age of all buyers also hit a fresh record, 47, increasing for a third straight year — and well above the median age of 31 in 1981.

Getting Older

The median age for all U.S. homebuyer profiles is creeping higher

Click link to see graph: https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2019-11-08/young-homebuyers-vanish-from-u-s-as-median-purchasing-age-jumps

Note: Survey conducted almost every other year prior to 2002. No data for 1983 and 1999.

While the median age of first-time home buyers only rose by one year, the increase reflects a variety of factors facing Americans searching for a home.

A nationwide shortage of affordable housing, coupled with lower mortgage rates, has stoked prices in cities from the coasts to the heartland. At the same time, student loans and other debts make it harder for Americans to save tens of thousands of dollars for a down payment, while tight lending standards can make getting a bank loan difficult for borrowers with less-than-stellar credit scores.

“Housing affordability is so difficult today, especially when coupled with rising rents and student loan debt, that they’re finding different ways to enter home ownership,” said Jessica Lautz, vice president of demographics and behavioral insights at the Realtors group in Washington.

The characteristics of home buyers have changed in recent years. The share of married couples has declined as unmarried couples and those purchasing as roommates has risen.

As buyers’ ages have increased, so have their incomes. The typical income of purchasers rose to $93,200 in 2018 as a lack of affordable options squeezed lower-income potential buyers out of the market.

Higher prices of homes have also changed how first-time buyers are entering the market. Nearly a third of first-time home buyers said they used a gift from a relative or friend to fund their down payment.

Builders have cited a shortage of affordable lots and labor as reasons to build fewer or bigger single-family homes, leaving America’s growing population to consider more of the existing housing stock. New homes as a proportion of all purchases fell to a low of 13% in records dating back to 1981.

The report reflects survey responses from 5,870 people who purchased a primary residence in the period between July 2018 and June 2019.

Source: Bloomberg.com – By 

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Here’s Where You Can Buy a Home if You Make Less Than $50,000 a Year

 

The conversation around homeownership in Mississauga and surrounding cities has been a challenging one, especially as prices remain high across all housing types in the city and surrounding municipalities (in fact, the average 905 condo is selling for over $400,000 and has been for sometime now).

But while it’s frustrating for experts—and non-experts who entered the market years ago—to tell prospective homebuyers that they’ll have to move to find an affordable housing, some people might be interested to know that there are indeed still places in Canada that offer affordable homes for single buyers with more modest salaries.

And a recent Zoocasa report reveals where solo homeowners-to-be on a budget might be able to purchase a home.

“While having a dual-income household can greatly improve purchasing power and the ability to qualify for a mortgage, that’s not to say homeownership isn’t in the cards for single-income earning buyers. In fact, according to recent calculations by Zoocasa in celebration of Single Awareness Day (February 15), there are a number of markets where it’s possible to buy a home on one income – and even have money left over,” says Penelope Graham, managing editor, Zoocasa. 

Graham says that, to determine which markets were affordable, the average and benchmark home prices were sourced from regional real estate boards. It was then assumed the buyer would make a 20 per cent down payment and take out financing with a 3.29 per cent interest rate amortized over 30 years, to determine the minimum income required to qualify for a mortgage on the average home.

Those findings were then compared to median income data of “persons living alone who earned employment income” as reported by Statistics Canada.Buying Single - Income Gap - Age 25-64

  • Buying a Home Single - Age 25 to 34
  • Buying a Home Single - Age 35 to 44

Buying a Home Single - Age 45 to 54

So, where can solo buyers most easily afford a home?

Overall, single home buyers will see the best bang for their buck in Eastern Canada and the Prairie provinces, with Regina taking top spot out of 20 cities for greatest affordability.

There, a single buyer earning the median income of $58,823 would enjoy an income surplus of $20,025 on the average priced home of $284,424.

That’s followed by Saint John, where someone earning the median of $42,888 would see a surplus of $18,038 on a $181,576 home, and Edmonton, where earning $64,036 would net a $17,826 surplus on the average home price of $338,760.

MLS listings in Calgary, Lethbridge, Winnipeg, and Halifax also fall within the realm of affordability for single-income purchasers.

So, where are single buyers less likely to purchase a home? As expected, Zoocasa says the Greater Golden Horseshoe (which includes Toronto and the GTA), is out of most people’s budgets.

Graham says a buyer earning the median of $50,721 would fall a whopping $88,361 short on the average $1,019,600 for MLS listings in Vancouver. Toronto real estate listings are the second-least affordable with an average home price of $748,328; a buyer earning $55,221 would face an income gap of $46,858.

Victoria is the third least affordable with an average home price of $633,386, still $39,359 above what the relatively high median income of $86,400 could afford.

Other markets not considered affordable for single buyers include Guelph, Kitchener-Waterloo, London, Montreal, and Ottawa.

Naturally, the housing market is more difficult for single millennials to navigate.

Zoocasa says the research also compared how earnings ranged by age group per location, and which demographic enjoyed the greatest affordability when purchasing a home. Across every market, Gen Xers (35 – 44 and 45 – 54 age brackets) enjoy the greatest earnings and purchasing power, with 11 markets considered within affordable reach (compared to 10 markets across all age groups).

Millennials (aged 25 – 34) had the least earning power in each city, behind Boomers (aged 55 – 64).

Overall, single home buyers aged 35 – 44 purchasing a home in Regina enjoyed the greatest affordability of all, with an income surplus of $24,215. A millennial purchasing in Vancouver had the least, facing a gap of $92,774.

Check out the infographics below to see which Canadian housing markets are most affordable for single buyers, courtesy of Zoocasa.

  • Buying a Home Single - Age 55 to 64

Top 5 Most Affordable Housing Markets for Single Home Buyers


1 – Regina

Average home price: $284,44

Income required: $38,798

Actual median income: $58,823

Income surplus: $20,025


2 – Saint John

Average home price: $181,576

Income required: 24,769

Actual median income: $42,888

Income surplus: $18,038


3 – Edmonton

Average home price: $338,760

Income required: $46,210

Actual median income: $64,036

Income surplus: $17,826


4 – Saskatoon

Average home price: $290,736

Income required: $39,659

Actual median income: $55,758

Income surplus: $16,099


5 – St. John’s

Average home price: $295,211

Income required: $40,270

Actual median income: $51,964

Income surplus: $11,694


5 Least Affordable Housing Markets for Single Buyers

1 – Vancouver

Average home price: $1,019,600

Income required: $139,082

Actual median income: $50,721

Income gap: $88,361


2 – Toronto

Average home price: $748,328

Income required: $102,079

Actual median income: $55,221

Income gap: $46,858


3 – Victoria

Average home price: $633,386

Income required: $86,400

Actual median income: $47,041

Income gap: $39,359


4 – Abbotsford

Average home price: $590,900

Income required: $80,604

Actual median income: $46,714

Income gap: $33,890


5 – Hamilton-Burlington

Average home price: $550,058

Income required: $75,033

Actual median income: $51,253

Income gap: $23,778

Source: Insauga.com – by Ashley Newport on November 1, 2019
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